Tag: Children

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Mother’s Day: No Laughing Matter

 

I realized something for the first time when my kids were of an age for sleepovers and birthday parties: dads are funnier than moms.

I might have noticed it in my own house if it wasn’t right under my nose. My husband was the one to get on the floor and wrestle, start sock fights, and make jokes when it was time to get serious. That’s not to say I could never be found on the floor with kids crawling all over me, but there’s something different about mommy wrestling as opposed daddy wrestling–a certain lack of abandon and goofiness. My daughter would come home from a party or church event with stories about how Cheri’s dad had made them laugh while driving them to the skating rink, or how Leslie’s dad had played a stupid trick that backfired. It was never the moms. Mothers could certainly be fun (I’d like to think I was. Maybe. Sometimes.), but seldom funny.

Several years ago Jerry Lewis made a controversial statement when asked who his favorite female comedians were.  His answer: None, because women aren’t funny. That raised a stink among women, many of whom seriously protested that they were funny—which kind of proved his point, in a way.  I would say that women aren’t funny in the same way.  They can be witty (as my mother was), clever, sharp, catty, artless, or charming, but there’s a reason male standup comics far outnumber females, and it doesn’t have much if anything to do with discrimination.  Of those few successful female comics, most of them are known for the mordant kind of humor: the biting, even bitter kind.  It’s because women, more than men, have a tragic view of life.  And that’s because of one thing: women have babies.

Rafael Mangual joins Kay Hymowitz to discuss evidence suggesting that children are often better off when criminal parents are imprisoned—the subject of Mangual’s story, “Fathers, Families, and Incarceration,” from the Winter 2020 Issue of City Journal.

A common criticism of incarceration in the United States, notes Mangual, is that it harms children by taking parents or siblings out of their homes. But recent studies show that children living with a parent who engages in high levels of antisocial behavior may be worse off than kids with incarcerated parents.

Karol Markowicz joins Kay Hymowitz to discuss raising young children in New York City.

“Raising a family in the city is just too hard,” concluded The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson last summer. But in Park Slope, one of New York’s most desirable neighborhoods, thousands of families thrive. Still, parents must navigate a host of challenges unique to urban life, including pricey housing, complex schooling options, and sometimes-unfriendly public spaces.

Naomi Schaefer Riley joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the state of the American child-welfare services, and describes and what some nonprofits are doing to improve foster care across the country.

Nationally, Riley notes in City Journal, about 444,000 children are in foster-care. And in many states, “officials report a severe shortage of families to take in these children.” On top of that, disturbing incidents like the death of Zymere Perkins in New York highlight the failure of local child-welfare services to intervene in the face of clear evidence of abuse.

Enviro-Fascism for Toddlers

 

My kindergartner (ok, not a toddler, per se) is watching some Nickelodeon show called “Rainbow Rangers.” I only paid attention to the background noise until I heard something infuriating.  Their happy little home was experiencing earthquakes; very odd, since they’re not on a fault line. What could possibly be causing this destruction to their home?

Why, fracking, of course. “Scientists say that it’s bad for the environment.” The fracking manager lays booby traps and is, of course, as evil as possible. Undeterred, the Rainbow Rangers show him a better way to generate energy: windmills! Never mentioned, of course, is that wind energy is incredibly inefficient and saves no money long term, to say nothing of the impact (pardon the pun) on fowl-life.

It’s a bleak search for good news on the Three Martini Lunch.  Today, Jim and Greg cringe as reports show the federal government has been flailing unsuccessfully for a sound policy in Afghanistan, lying to the public about what’s been achieved, and wasting an obscene amount of taxpayer dollars.  They also react to the mass shooting committed by a Saudi military officer at Pensacola Naval Air Station Friday, in what increasingly appears to be an act of Islamic terrorism.  And they roll their eyes hard as the Democratic counsel for the House Judiciary Committee claims his young son asked him a deep and probing question about the character of the president.

Member Post

 

Summer is trying to turn to Fall here in Northwest Florida without much luck. It’s Hot, Dry – no rain for 35 days. I watch the birds, bees, and butterflies take turns sipping from the bird bath and fluttering through the cold water spray from natural springs below ground when I turn on the sprinkler.  […]

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Using Children as Political Pawns

 

Most people would laugh if you suggested that in spite of the perception that child sacrifice has ended, it hasn’t. A person need only look at the way the immigrant children are being used to know that figuratively, child sacrifice for the political Left is alive and well.

You might think I’m using hyperbole, but there is a history of the Left using and manipulating children for politics, and these practices are getting worse. Does anyone remember which Democratic National Convention planted children at the podium who despaired about the effects of climate change? They were being used to call out the potential end of the world if we didn’t all take action. Or what about the children who were taught songs about President Obama?

Parenting Thoughts: The Virtue of “No”

 

I think I did alright in the child-raising department. There are a lot of things I don’t do well, and a few I do very badly, but I think I’ve been a good parent, particularly in the last decade or so. There’s quite a bit of on-the-job training involved in parenting — hardly any other kind, in fact — and I think I was better at it when I finished than when I started. I’m sure my older children would second that, perhaps with more vigor than I’d like.

If I could pass on a bit of advice, it would be on the important topic of saying “no” to your children.

Every Other Sunday

 

Have you ever loved something but hated it at the same time? I do. It’s a song by Zac Brown Band called Highway 20 Ride.

Music has a way of transporting a person to a point in time like few other mediums. Many songs do this to me, but Highway 20 Ride is noteworthy, and if you’ve ever been affected by divorce, it might be for you as well.

Member Post

 

Having mentioned several days ago that I was an eligibility worker for Los Angeles County, AFDC for a time in the 1960s. I came upon a Dear Abby article, cannot remember the news paper or the year, but was so impressed with it I printed it out and made hundreds of copies to hand out […]

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Transgender Curriculum for Kindergarten

 

Our schools have been corrupted in many ways that are difficult to fathom: U.S. History has been distorted, English composition has been bastardized, standards continue to be lowered to accommodate the worst students. And now we are brainwashing students as early as kindergarten, saying that transgender students are normal. How did we arrive at this place?

We often point to the Leftist agenda for these changes in education. Just to give you an idea of how sophisticated these efforts are, we can look at Washington State, where the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI) has established new requirements. This summary gives you the highlights, from K-12. In the case of the OSPI, parents were not notified of these changes.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America fume after a federal judge decides the debate over whether women should have to register for the draft has gone on long enough and rules the all-male draft is unconstitutional.  They also defend California Sen. Dianne Feinstein after supporters of the Green New Deal send small children to beg Feinstein to join their cause.  Then Jim unleashes a powerful response as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez questions whether the planet is in such peril that young people should no longer have children.  And they have their favorite catch phrase ready as former Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid bashes Pres. Trump and says he misses President George W. Bush, whom Reid derided as a loser and a liar a decade ago.

Member Post

 

It should be. My 83 year old mother-in-law whipped up a batch and presented it on Saturday in a decorative glittery holiday container. Today it is half gone. What is it about little rice, wheat and corn squares, mini pretzels, nuts, those little cheese it fish, butter, a dash of Worcestershire, and a secret seasoning […]

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Member Post

 

A 9-year-old boy lobbied successfully to get his town’s ban on snowball fights overturned. Reminded me of some comments by Goethe, circa 1828.  He observed  that when Englishmen came to town, they were invariably a hit with the local women. Indeed, when one of them came to visit, Goethe found it necessary to brace himself […]

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Dear Daughter, This is Why I Won’t Tell You Who I’m Voting for…

 

Dear Daughter,

Yesterday was your 11th birthday. You came out of your room took one look at me in my striped grey sweater, turned on your heels and returned wearing your own sweater that was almost identical. You said, “Mom, now we match!” Even though we were spending the day with your middle school friends, you weren’t embarrassed. You hugged me, and I knew this could be a last.