Tag: Children

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Subconsciously, we know that no one knows everything. Despite this knowledge, we tend to expect this of the people we look up to most, whether it’s our parents, teachers, or the other adults in our lives. We create this idea that they are flawless superheroes, as though they never grapple with much of anything, except […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Some Monsters Are Real

 

In Full Metal Jacket, the doorgunner, responding to the question of how someone could kill a child, says that it’s easy. “You just don’t lead them as much.” Perhaps black comedy is emblematic of the debacle that was Vietnam, but the line for me has always shown such a callous disregard for the life of children that it’s a movie I will never watch again. Once was more than enough. Killing children should never be the point of any joke.

After I got out of the Army, I became a respiratory therapist. In that role, I got to meet the Grim Reaper on a daily basis. When I heard “Code Blue,” I ran to wherever that loss of cardiopulmonary activity was reported and did my best to wrest back that life from the great beyond. We were successful about 30% of the time. When God calls, no one gets to put Him on hold.

Scott Atlas joined Ben Domenech to discuss the data surrounding schools reopening and the dangers of not following the science. Atlas is a fellow in scientific philosophy and public policy at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a member of Hoover’s Working Group on Health Care Policy, and the former head of neuroradiology at Stanford Medical School.

Atlas laid out multiple points of scientific evidence indicating the necessity of reopening schools. This included the documented facts that children are young people are at low risk of developing COVID-19 themselves and they’re at low risk of spreading it to others. Furthermore, he said, school closures are extremely harmful to children’s health in different ways, especially in that distance learning has proven to be a failure.

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I went for my usual walk on the Chicago lakefront today. Our mayor, Lori Lightfoot, has not yet opened the beaches (the actual ones with sand) on the lakefront, nor has she allowed the public pools in the city parks to be opened. As a result, in the Loop area where I live, families from […]

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Check out the video on my Youtube Channel!

Join me as I make a mask at home out of one of my t-shirts!

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Mother’s Day: No Laughing Matter

 

I realized something for the first time when my kids were of an age for sleepovers and birthday parties: dads are funnier than moms.

I might have noticed it in my own house if it wasn’t right under my nose. My husband was the one to get on the floor and wrestle, start sock fights, and make jokes when it was time to get serious. That’s not to say I could never be found on the floor with kids crawling all over me, but there’s something different about mommy wrestling as opposed daddy wrestling–a certain lack of abandon and goofiness. My daughter would come home from a party or church event with stories about how Cheri’s dad had made them laugh while driving them to the skating rink, or how Leslie’s dad had played a stupid trick that backfired. It was never the moms. Mothers could certainly be fun (I’d like to think I was. Maybe. Sometimes.), but seldom funny.

Several years ago Jerry Lewis made a controversial statement when asked who his favorite female comedians were. His answer: None, because women aren’t funny. That raised a stink among women, many of whom seriously protested that they were funny—which kind of proved his point, in a way. I would say that women aren’t funny in the same way. They can be witty (as my mother was), clever, sharp, catty, artless, or charming, but there’s a reason male standup comics far outnumber females, and it doesn’t have much if anything to do with discrimination. Of those few successful female comics, most of them are known for the mordant kind of humor: the biting, even bitter kind. It’s because women, more than men, have a tragic view of life. And that’s because of one thing: women have babies.

Rafael Mangual joins Kay Hymowitz to discuss evidence suggesting that children are often better off when criminal parents are imprisoned—the subject of Mangual’s story, “Fathers, Families, and Incarceration,” from the Winter 2020 Issue of City Journal.

A common criticism of incarceration in the United States, notes Mangual, is that it harms children by taking parents or siblings out of their homes. But recent studies show that children living with a parent who engages in high levels of antisocial behavior may be worse off than kids with incarcerated parents.

Karol Markowicz joins Kay Hymowitz to discuss raising young children in New York City.

“Raising a family in the city is just too hard,” concluded The Atlantic’s Derek Thompson last summer. But in Park Slope, one of New York’s most desirable neighborhoods, thousands of families thrive. Still, parents must navigate a host of challenges unique to urban life, including pricey housing, complex schooling options, and sometimes-unfriendly public spaces.

Naomi Schaefer Riley joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the state of the American child-welfare services, and describes and what some nonprofits are doing to improve foster care across the country.

Nationally, Riley notes in City Journal, about 444,000 children are in foster-care. And in many states, “officials report a severe shortage of families to take in these children.” On top of that, disturbing incidents like the death of Zymere Perkins in New York highlight the failure of local child-welfare services to intervene in the face of clear evidence of abuse.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Enviro-Fascism for Toddlers

 

My kindergartner (ok, not a toddler, per se) is watching some Nickelodeon show called “Rainbow Rangers.” I only paid attention to the background noise until I heard something infuriating. Their happy little home was experiencing earthquakes; very odd, since they’re not on a fault line. What could possibly be causing this destruction to their home?

Why, fracking, of course. “Scientists say that it’s bad for the environment.” The fracking manager lays booby traps and is, of course, as evil as possible. Undeterred, the Rainbow Rangers show him a better way to generate energy: windmills! Never mentioned, of course, is that wind energy is incredibly inefficient and saves no money long term, to say nothing of the impact (pardon the pun) on fowl-life.

It’s a bleak search for good news on the Three Martini Lunch. Today, Jim and Greg cringe as reports show the federal government has been flailing unsuccessfully for a sound policy in Afghanistan, lying to the public about what’s been achieved, and wasting an obscene amount of taxpayer dollars. They also react to the mass shooting committed by a Saudi military officer at Pensacola Naval Air Station Friday, in what increasingly appears to be an act of Islamic terrorism. And they roll their eyes hard as the Democratic counsel for the House Judiciary Committee claims his young son asked him a deep and probing question about the character of the president.

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Summer is trying to turn to Fall here in Northwest Florida without much luck. It’s Hot, Dry – no rain for 35 days. I watch the birds, bees, and butterflies take turns sipping from the bird bath and fluttering through the cold water spray from natural springs below ground when I turn on the sprinkler. […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Using Children as Political Pawns

 

Most people would laugh if you suggested that in spite of the perception that child sacrifice has ended, it hasn’t. A person need only look at the way the immigrant children are being used to know that figuratively, child sacrifice for the political Left is alive and well.

You might think I’m using hyperbole, but there is a history of the Left using and manipulating children for politics, and these practices are getting worse. Does anyone remember which Democratic National Convention planted children at the podium who despaired about the effects of climate change? They were being used to call out the potential end of the world if we didn’t all take action. Or what about the children who were taught songs about President Obama?

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https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/04/climate/climate-lawsuit-juliana.html This is just one of many articles and the case isn’t new, but it represents more than “kids suing government to protect their future health losses from climate change.”  Preview Open

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

In an interview with Reuters (as reported by The Hill), Bob Iger, the CEO and Chairman of the Board of the Walt Disney Company, has proclaimed that “It will be very difficult for Disney to film in Georgia if the ‘heartbeat’ bill takes effect.” (Emphasis below mine). Walt Disney CEO Bob Iger warned that it […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Parenting Thoughts: The Virtue of “No”

 

I think I did alright in the child-raising department. There are a lot of things I don’t do well, and a few I do very badly, but I think I’ve been a good parent, particularly in the last decade or so. There’s quite a bit of on-the-job training involved in parenting — hardly any other kind, in fact — and I think I was better at it when I finished than when I started. I’m sure my older children would second that, perhaps with more vigor than I’d like.

If I could pass on a bit of advice, it would be on the important topic of saying “no” to your children.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Every Other Sunday

 

Have you ever loved something but hated it at the same time? I do. It’s a song by Zac Brown Band called Highway 20 Ride.

Music has a way of transporting a person to a point in time like few other mediums. Many songs do this to me, but Highway 20 Ride is noteworthy, and if you’ve ever been affected by divorce, it might be for you as well.

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Having mentioned several days ago that I was an eligibility worker for Los Angeles County, AFDC for a time in the 1960s. I came upon a Dear Abby article, cannot remember the news paper or the year, but was so impressed with it I printed it out and made hundreds of copies to hand out […]

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