Tag: Charles C.W. Cooke

Where Is Kevin D. Williamson?

 

I followed the story in depth of Kevin’s hiring and firing at The Atlantic, so no, I’m not some yokel who’s asking a basic question that everyone else knows the answer to. And I’ve seen some pieces he’s written since then on NR, where he is credited simply as “a Texas-based writer” as opposed to his old handle as NR’s “roaming correspondent.” He currently exists among the living, I am quite sure.

So where are the new episodes of Mad Dogs & Englishmen? Perhaps if he had a contractual obligation while working at The Atlantic that he could no longer record podcasts with Ricochet, I might understand. But he seems to be a free agent at the moment, and while NR I’m sure would roll out the red carpet again for him to come back to work, he hasn’t taken them up on that just yet. Perhaps I should explain why I care.

Member Post

 

For those who use Twitter, Charles C.W. Cooke’s twitter feed has been a sight to behold today. NR’s resident 2nd Amendment expert has been rebutting progressives and defending the 2nd and 5th Amendments all day long. Gotta love a conservative pundit who ventures outside of right-wing media and engages with the unfiltered general public.  Preview […]

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Welcome to The Conservatarians, a brand spankin’ new podcast hosted by Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel and KTAR-FM‘s Jim Sharpe. For the premiere episode, Jon and Jim welcome the man who inspired the podcast name, Charles C. W. Cooke, author of The Conservatarian Manifesto and co-host of the popular “Mad Dogs & Englishmen” podcast.

Charles defines the term “conservatarian,” names a few politicos who fit the description, and defends Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band from Jon’s praise of Pet Sounds. Other topics include the Paris Climate Conference, the latest perfidy from the EPA, and Hollywood’s ridiculous plan to rewrite Ted Kennedy’s darkest hour.

Member Post

 

Of course you would.  How could anyone not want to spend time with the National Review writer,  author of The Conservatarian Manifesto, and a strong advocate for free speech and Second Amendment rights?The most attractive conservative alive? Women love him; men want to be him. Preview Open

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Member Post

 

There has clearly been a lot of excitement over on the Main Feed about this week’s podcast aka The Podcast From Hell.  Clearly the hosts experienced some anxiety over putting it together as evidenced by the exchange between Rob and Peter towards the end.  However, for a non-rehearsed conversation, between two people who adamantly disagree, […]

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Ricochet: Home of the Conservatarians?

 

41HW16e6UrLLast year, my good friend Will Patrick, here in Tallahassee, Florida, introduced me to the Ricochet podcasts. The first episode that caught my attention was one dedicated to President Reagan’s first meeting with Gorbachev at Reykjavik. It was fascinating.

For more than 10 years, I have been involved in the conservative/liberty movement through my current work at The James Madison Institute (JMI) in Florida, and previously with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI). Between what I read and the many speakers I get to meet and hear from in person and at conferences, I felt like I had a great grasp on all the top scholars and thinkers in the movement. However, the Ricochet podcast has served to introduce me to so many more, including people like Avik Roy and Charles C.W. Cooke. During my many travels visiting JMI’s supporters around the state of Florida, I listen to the podcast almost religiously and find it quite entertaining and thoughtful. [Editor’s Note: Want to become a member of Ricochet and get a free month on us? Join today and use the coupon code APRIL for your discount.]

After hearing Charlie Cooke on the Ricochet podcast several times, I migrated over to his Mad Dogs & Englishmen podcast. And I recently read his fascinating new book, The Conservatarian Manifesto (of which I will soon post a review).

What Keeps You Up At Night?

 

On a recent episode of the Mad Dogs & Englishmen podcast, starting around 25’45”, National Reviews Kevin Williamson and Charles C.W. Cooke asked each other about their political fears. Both agreed that the world is a much less scary place than it was a few decades ago. The chance of a civilization-ending nuclear exchange are greatly diminished; medicine continues to improve; violent crime is down significantly in the United States, etc.

Which is hardly to say everything’s perfect. Williamson pointed out that while the old Dr. Strangelove scenarios are far less likely, the chance of an odd nuclear weapon here or there is concerning, especially for someone who works at National Review’s address (or, for that matter, in Tel Aviv). Moreover, our increasing globalization gives contagious diseases an advantage and it’s possible that could get nasty again.

Matthew Yglesias: Not the Sharpest Tool in the Vox

 

Time ZonesLongtime readers are well aware that I do not take Matthew Yglesias seriously as a thinker.  Yglesias is one of the sources of inspiration — if not the source — for Yousefzadeh’s Law, which states that “[t]here is no meritocracy in the field of punditry.”  (Alternately, one may use the Peter Principle to explain Yglesias’s rise in the punditry world.)

Today, Yglesias gives us yet another reason to wonder whether his entire career in punditry has just been one long attempt to troll the planet.  He advocates — dear God, I really don’t believe this! — abolishing all time zones, and having all of us run on Greenwich Mean Time.

Why is this necessary? Yglesias voxsplains in the excerpt below: