Tag: Census

Join Jim and Greg as they cautiously welcome the new shifting of congressional seats based upon the 2020 U.S. Census and the opportunity for Republicans to win a House majority. They also roll their eyes as John Kerry denies telling Iran’s foreign minister about covert Israeli operations in Syria while former Obama official Ben Rhodes comes up with a completely contradictory defense of Kerry’s actions.  And they sigh as Rep. Liz Cheney says she hasn’t decided one way or another on a 2024 presidential bid.

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Like every other state, Illinois is in the process of drawing new legislative boundaries as is required every 10 years after the taking of the census. This year is unique because (like everything else) COVID interrupted the process. The Illinois Constitution provides that the legislature has until June 30th to draw a new legislative map. […]

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This year’s census (available for completion online) is surprisingly quick and painless. There are no questions about medical insurance, vaccinations, or other health issues. There’s not even a question about household income. The census includes only three sections: place of residence (Do you own, lease, or rent?), household relationships (married, unmarried, etc), and ethnicity.  I […]

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Concerning the news the Census questionnaire will be published WITHOUT the citizenship question (boggles the mind, doesn’t it?), I had this thought.  When you receive your form, or have a census taker come to your door, do this. Write in bold letters at the top of the first page; yes, I am a citizen of […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America relish watching Beto O’Rourke get exposed yet again as an empty suit who only knows platitudes and pandering. They also cover the Supreme Court’s decision that will likely keep the citizenship question off the 2020 census. And they discuss Tim Ryan and Tulsi Gabbard clashing on the Afghan War while summing up the rest of the candidates in the first Democratic debate.

This week on Banter, Michael Strain and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach joined the show to discuss the importance of the 2020 census and the challenges to its implementation, including a lack of funding and a controversial proposal to include a question on US citizenship. Dr. Strain is the John G. Searle Scholar and director of economic policy studies at the American Enterprise Institute. Previously, he worked in the Center for Economic Studies at the US Census Bureau. Dr. Schanzenbach serves as director of the Institute for Policy Research and is a faculty fellow and the Margaret Walker Alexander Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. Drs. Strain and Schanzenbach contributed to a 2017 report, “In Order That They May Rest Their Argument on Facts: the Vital Role of Government-Collected Data,” and participated in a public event at AEI this week on the significance of the 2020 Census. You can watch the full event video and read the report at the links below.

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The Department of Commerce issued a press release on the reinstatement of a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. On December 12, 2017, DOJ requested that the Census Bureau reinstate a citizenship question on the decennial census to provide census block level citizenship voting age population (CVAP) data that is not currently available from government […]

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This week on Banter, Dr. Michael Strain discussed a variety of hot topics, including immigration, minimum wage laws, and the significance of the U.S. Census. Dr. Strain is the director of economic policy studies at AEI. His research focuses on labor economics, public finance, and social policies. Several of his papers have been published in peer-reviewed academic and policy journals, and he also writes frequently for popular audiences.

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud President Trump for aggressively rolling back burdensome federal regulations.  They also wince at new Census Bureau data showing more Americans aged 18-34 live with their parents than with a spouse, a major shift from 40 years ago.  And they brace themselves for Barack Obama’s first public appearance since Inauguration Day and discuss how active Obama is likely to be in policy debates.

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Major Premise:  Race relations have gotten worse over the past eight years because of the culture’s relentless focus on race.  This has been pushed forward by Obama himself, who in 2009 called for a “national dialogue” on race, as if nobody had talked about it for the past century.  This dialogue was not intended to be an […]

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It’s census week in Canada and social media is buzzing. You see, the last census was taken in 2011, during the dark ages of the Harper government who didn’t Love Science. They made the “long form census” voluntary (everyone still had to fill out basic information about who was living in each household, but a more […]

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The US Middle Class Hasn’t Stagnated for Decades — And Democrats Should Stop Saying it Has

 

Money_Flickr_8_5_2015-e1438792499478In my new The Week column, I explore “What Democrats Get Wrong About the Middle Class.” Here is a bit:

The problem is that Census data paints an incomplete picture. A University of Chicago poll of top economists earlier this year found that 70 percent agreed that the Census conclusion “substantially understates how much better off people in the median American household are now economically, compared with 35 years ago.” How far off are those numbers? Maybe quite a bit. Feldstein argues that they fail to take into account shrinking household size, the rise in government benefit transfers, and changes in tax policy. They also measure inflation in a way some experts thinks overstates the true rise in living costs. He notes that when the Congressional Budget Office took all those factors into account, it found median household income had risen by 53 percent since 1980, five times as much as the narrower Census figures.

And it could be even higher. A lot higher. A growing number of economists are questioning whether our existing measures of economic growth and inflation are suited to the digital economy. A recent Goldman Sachs analysis suggests we may be understating annual economic growth by nearly a third due to our inability to accurately measure how vastly improved software and hardware are boosting productivity. Likewise, government data ignores the consumer value of free internet services like Facebook, Google, and Twitter. Put it all together, and Feldstein thinks real median household income may have risen by 2.5 percent a year over the past 30 years, not 0.3 percent. That would suggest a doubling of living standards over the past generation. And even those figures ignore welfare gains from rising life expectancy, which economists Charles Jones and Peter Klenow think could equal a full percentage point a year.