Tag: Censorship

Why I Left Facebook

 

Four years ago a cartoon contest was held in Garland, Texas. Organizers encouraged contestants to draw political cartoons in response to a terrorist attack by Islamic supremacists on the offices of Charlie Hebdo, a Parisian newspaper, in January of 2015, in which a dozen people, including the newspaper’s publishing director Stéphane Charbonnier, were murdered.

This is the winning cartoon, drawn by a fellow named Bosch Fawstin.

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The Battle over Free Speech: Are Trigger Warnings, Safe Spaces and No Platforming Harming Young Minds?Eleanor Penney warning – she participates in this youtube discussion. My favorite speaker in this panel is Jonathan Haidt, the author of “The Coddling of the American Mind.” Haidt mentions that we have a mental health crisis for both boys […]

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Outsourcing Curation of Access to a Platform Is More Efficient than Crude Censorship

 

In 1975 Indira Gandhi declared a state of national emergency in India due to “internal disturbances caused by a Foreign Hand.” (She meant the CIA.)

It is widely believed that she actually declared The Emergency (ever since capitalized in India, like The War) because she had just been found guilty by the Supreme Court of using state machinery for electioneering, and she didn’t know what the personal or political consequences of that would be. Anyway, declare it she did and a wide range of civil liberties were suspended. More than 100,000 people were incarcerated as political prisoners over the next two years and there was a very murky forcible sterilization program implemented in parts of North India. In 1977, Indira Gandhi ended The Emergency, released all political prisoners, and called a general election in which her party (the Indian National Congress) was trounced and she lost her own seat.

The Janata Party, the coalition that won the election, managed to maintain their Parliamentary majority till 1980 when internal differences overcame them. They were forced to call an election, Indira Gandhi and the Congress were voted back into power, and the country slipped back into a stupor for the next few years.

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As libertarian high school students at a public school, we decided to make our latest podcast episode a respectful challenge to the bureaucracy. This is our first time posting to Ricochet, so please comment and let us know what you think! https://anchor.fm/statesponsoredprogramming/episodes/Censorship–School-Choice-ft–Superintendent-Jodie-Hausmann–Ep–8-e2ne70 Preview Open

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I don’t really want to leave Twitter.  Quick thoughts have come to be my style, and fit well into the occasional gap that full-time employment allows in this day and age.  Longer, more detailed and better researched pieces that Ricochet seems to demand are less viable. But with the piece by Jon Gabriel in the […]

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@jamesmadison recent post on the company Google titled “Be Evil”, reminded me of the censorship and removal of talk show host Alex Jones. I’d never heard of Alex Jones until I stumbled on his Fox Network radio broadcast starting at 12:00 noon in my area during the 2016 presidential campaign. I am self-employed and drive around […]

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We like to think only the most illiberal believe in censorship–those leaders of mobs whose authoritarian impulses are often masked by their expressed concerns for shielding humanity from harm–but all sorts of people in our country have a long history of burning literature and discarding art if they find it too offensive for the public […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are happy to Republicans senators like Ted Cruz, Ben Sasse, and John Kennedy pin down Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg on critical issues like censorship, free speech, and user policies that actually benefit Facebook members.  They also react to House Speaker Paul Ryan announcing his retirement, looking both at his record and the increased likelihood that Democrats will take back the House this year.  And they have fun with London’s ridiculous new knife control push after 50 stabbing deaths in the city this year, including police confiscating scissors and pliers as deadly weapons.

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Twitter agrees with “calls for “civil war,” the destruction of the GOP, and the adoption of how California runs everything from sea to shining sea”. Facebook is being all facebooky with Black Trump supporters Diamond and Silk calling them, and it’s hard not to type this without laughing “unsafe for the community“. They’re provocative, verbose (at least Diamond […]

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Social Media Alternatives for Conservatives

 

So this may be a topic that is already addressed somewhere on Ricochet, but I am new here and still trying to find my way around. I found Ricochet while searching for social media platforms for conservatives. I’m shocked by the lack of alternatives given the hostile treatment we get on platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube.

Is it that difficult to collect resources and technological expertise for a platform to upload videos (serious question, not rhetorical)? If anyone is aware of good alternatives please list them in a comment. As I am aware:

  1.  Ricochet is a close match to a social media platform
  2. CRTV is doing a good job providing media content, but it does not allow general users to upload content
  3. Gab.ai is a Twitter alternative
  4. Others???

Given the current social media environment for conservative ideas, creating alternatives to the leftist giants should be a top priority for conservative/libertarian movers and shakers. If our voices cannot be heard then our ideas cannot be shared. If our ideas cannot be shared then we will lose the next generation of Americans and with them our liberties.

EPA Scientists Banned from Speaking at Climate Conference

 

The EPA administration is fighting back against the climate change ideologues. The agency has cancelled the speaking appearances of three scientists who were scheduled to speak at a non-EPA conference on subjects related to climate change.

These scientists contributed to a 400-plus-page report to be issued today on the status of the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program and its challenges, and there are fears that scientists are being silenced from speaking on this controversial subject. It’s widely known that the head of the EPA, Scott Pruitt, questions whether human activity is a major contributor to climate change.

John King, a professor of oceanography at the University of Rhode Island, chairs the science advisory committee of the Narragansett Bay Estuary Program (which is sponsoring the conference), and stated the following:

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Next on Thinking It Through: I had the pleasure of speaking with Ms. Pardes Seleh. We had a wonderful conversation on censorship, free speech and Richard Spencer, Trump’s condolences to a Gold Star family and Rep. Frederica Wilson’s reaction, and Trump’s interactions with Iran and North Korea. (We had a few interruptions on this episode, […]

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For those following the recent story of Dr. James Damore, who was recently fired by Alphabet, Inc. (Google) for his doubleplusungood thoughtcrime, this very recent article posted at Slate Star Codex [1] may be of interest. It’s long (it’s Slate Star Codex, after all), but worth more than a gander. A slice: Now [Silicon Valley has] degenerated […]

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The Closing of the American Mind: 30 Years Ago

 

Allan Bloom’s Closing of the American Mind is a very strange book. In part an extended reflection on pop culture and in part a critical history of philosophy, it is also in part a personal memoir. Thirty years ago – when, as a favor to Nobel-Prize winner Saul Bellow, Simon and Schuster published his friend’s book – no one, least of all Bloom himself, expected it to attract much attention. But that it did – and more. For it became a phenomenon. In fact, for nearly a year, it was the talk of the land, and it sold like hotcakes. Bloom, who had always lived beyond his means, soon found it almost impossible to do so.

I doubt that a high proportion of those who purchased Bloom’s bestseller managed to get through or even much into its second part. This section of Bloom’s tome – entitled “Nihilism – American Style” – is brilliant, and the writing is quite lively. But to even begin to understand the argument, one must be a Kulturmensch with at least a passing familiarity with writers such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Nietzsche, and Heidegger; and those who got bogged down in the early pages of part two are not likely to have gone on to part three: “The University.” It was the book’s first part, entitled “Students,” that electrified the American public.

Philosophy may have been too abstruse a subject for most of those who purchased the book. But nearly all of them had children or grandchildren; and, thanks to the proverbial “generation gap,” their offspring were for them a puzzle and a source of considerable anxiety. The chapters that Bloom devoted to the character of American college students before the late 1960s, to the role that an encounter with classic literary and philosophical works often then played in the intellectual and moral development of the ablest of these, to the impact that rock music came to have on the next generation of students, and to the larger significance of the sexual revolution – these were for older Americans a real eye-opener. For the first time, they had more than an inkling of what they had on their hands.