Tag: Censorship

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From what little I can gather (or guess), the Powers That Be decided to handle Covid with a policy of Lockdowns, Vaccines, Masks, and Nothing Else.  I propose a new word for LOckdowns, VAccines, MAsks, and NOthing Else: lovamanoe, pronounced “lo-va-ma-no.” That the Powers managed to institute lovamanoe without the cooperation of the President of […]

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The Mob and the Banjo Player

 

The banjo player is, of course, Winston Marshall, recently of the hit band Mumford & Sons. The mob is the usual band of angry twits, the censorious harpies of Twitter and Antifa who can’t stand the thought that someone, somewhere, isn’t prostrating himself before the pile of dung that is their hateful and dishonest political ideology.

I don’t care for banjo music, and I’m at best lukewarm about Mumford & Sons. They have a few songs I like, but they’re too folksy for my tastes and so rarely come up in my playlists. Since I’m not particularly interested in music I didn’t realize that the band had become big: I stumbled across them a decade ago, thought they were a little boutique group with a few hits, and never had reason to revise my view until friends, big fans of the group, assured me that they’d achieved mega-band status. Who knew?

Giving the JPod Its Due (or, Horton Gaslights a Who)

 

Despite occasional comments of mine that might suggest otherwise, I’ve always thought John Podhoretz a decent and good-hearted man, obviously bright and articulate (if prone to outrageous and sometimes comic hyperbole).

John made a point in the March 9 Commentary podcast that I thought was perspicacious and worth repeating. I give him full credit for the observation, and nothing I say here adds anything of substance to what he said in the podcast. I’m repeating it mostly for the benefit of those who won’t hear the podcast, and also because I want to reaffirm his observations with my own experience.

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Neither conformity nor non-conformity are value propositions in and of themselves outside the context of the object or the impetus of the subject. To do as others do simply because others do is no more informative than not to do as others do simply because they do. The problem with conformity today as it reaches […]

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No matter how loud the chorus of deceit, nor cavernous the echo chamber of lies, nor thunderous the stampede of conformity, there is no sound loud enough, nor conspiracy of fools vast enough, to negate reality or silence the truth, so long as their remains even a single, solitary voice that dare speak it. Preview […]

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I was reading Bari Weiss’ announcement of a new organization called Fair that is going to try and fight back against cancel culture and she linked to a fascinating article by Abagaik Shrier entitled Book Banning in an Age of Amazon She had a wonderful quote that I think is amazing and you should all […]

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On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” President of the Ethics and Public Policy Center Ryan T. Anderson joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss Amazon’s recent attempt to deplatform his book “When Harry Became Sally: Responding to the Transgender Moment.”

Censorship & “Beyond Their Reach”

 

The older I become, the more I find that I squirm with embarrassment whenever I read the Ten Commandments. It’s not that I’m embarrassed by prohibitions or injunctions but, rather, I’m embarrassed that God found it necessary to give these particular ones. We generally give instructions to others based on our perception of their weaknesses and proclivities. And I can only conclude that God’s instructions reflect His understanding of the kind of people we are.

The prohibition against “graven images” suggests that mankind has a tendency to elevate and admire the works of his own hands over the God who made those hands to begin with. Centuries later, the apostle Paul made this explicit in his letter to the Romans when he described man as having “worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator”. So mankind apparently has an unhealthy tendency to overestimate the value of its own innovations. Peachy.

The Freedom Seed Vault

 

By Subiet – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=92970583

On the cold and inhospitable little Norwegian island of Spitsbergen is an oddly photogenic structure, the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. This austere yet visually striking underground storage facility is intended to secure the world’s agricultural future in the event that some barely imaginable catastrophe threatens it.

I don’t worry much about mass extinctions, v I certainly don’t worry about climate change. And I live way up north, in one of those growth zones where only fence posts, cows, and a few lichens really thrive, so I’m accustomed to plants that scoff at adversity and power on through.

On this episode of “The Federalist Radio Hour,” Senior Editor Christopher Bedford interviews Rachel Bovard of the Conservative Partnership Institute about the right’s uphill battle against Big Tech, censorship, shadowbanning, and de-platforming.

On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, PragerU’s Chief Marketing Officer Craig Strazzeri joins Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to outline how the organization is navigating and battling the censorship challenges presented by big tech companies such as YouTube and Facebook in their efforts to promote educational, conservative digital content.

QotD: From Sharyl Attkisson on Censorship

 

Saw this and thought of many of us:

When you see news outlets, “fact checkers,” Internet companies, and others working hard to keep you from seeing or believing something; or controversializing a news outlet, reporter, or other person; use that as a cue to understand that the item/fact/study at issue may actually be true and worthy of further inquiry on your part. The attention giving to censor or controversialize typically signals that powerful interests are trying to hide something or attempting to further a narrative that may be false.

Altered Images: Colorization

 

About thirty-five years ago the top bosses of my then-employer, the American Film Institute, got us into a real jam with our funders. Taking a stiff-necked, self-righteous pose, AFI impulsively issued strong statements and held an urgent press conference in support of a new artists’ rights movement headed by longtime board members and all-around AFI pals Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Saying yes to them must have seemed like a no-brainer. What, after all, could be controversial in 1980’s Hollywood about backing Steven and George? And they had allies; the film directors’ guild, as well as groups of film critics and other intellectuals, were coming out in force against a new media technology that they sternly called a mortal threat to America’s film heritage.

The new technique, supposedly so dangerous to preserving American culture on screen, was called colorization, using video technology to allow hand-coloring of black-and-white films and TV shows. In retrospect, it was one of the most overblown film controversies of the mid-Eighties. But the way it worked out set business precedents that still guide media law to this day, and shape the battleground over censorship and online cancel culture. Withdrawing Song of the South from general circulation, or turning police guns into walkie-talkies in E.T., cutting a Donald Trump cameo appearance out of Home Alone 2 or removing Kevin Spacey from All the Money in the World, —they were all affected by what happened in courtrooms and offices in the nearly-forgotten Colorization War of now-distant 1986.

Parler, Web Hosts, and Masterpiece Cakes

 

Parler lost its rented server space with Amazon Web Services.  Parler also found its phone apps booted off the Apple and Google app stores.  This is not the “destruction” of Parler – not unless Parler was on such shaky ground that it cannot be rebuilt.  This is certainly hamstringing it, but if this is a “death sentence”, then it is one that is easily overcome with cold hard cash (would that the Reaper were so easily fended off on more fleshly concerns).  We need perspective here, and an honest reckoning of what happened, how, and why.  We also need to yet again yank the plank from our own eye, for it was just a short while ago that we were adamantly defending another business for refusing paying clientele: I speak of none other than Masterpiece Cakes.

First, let’s get the technical stuff out of the way – understanding how Parler was built, and how it planned to make money for its creators (let’s not fool ourselves into thinking it was all charity work) is key to understanding its demise.  Web sites have to be located on computers.  You can make a website on your laptop and share it with the rest of the internet if you want.  Users just would need to know the numerical address in either IPV4 or IPV6 to find it.  If you want to make it easier to find then you would have to register a domain name, and then map that domain name to your server address.  Now suppose your little website got really popular because its topic was fun and lovable – let’s say, for the sake of argument, that your website was all about your pet bird.  If you had just a residential internet connection, after a point your neighbors would start to complain that traffic to your laptop was killing their own connections.  Plus, your laptop has limited processing power to keep serving page views out – and your addition of a little bird forum doubled traffic to the point where your laptop’s cooling fan failed from overuse.  How do you fix these issues?

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So after Twitter bans President Trump, Parler suddenly becomes the most-downloaded mobile phone application — prompting Apple, Google, and Amazon to conspire* to shut down Parler. I’ve never thought of myself as a populist, but, by golly, I’m there. We’re witnessing the rise of the machines. Figuratively speaking. Preview Open

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I dropped FB and switched to Parler but didn’t see this coming,… He added, “Apparently they believe Parler is responsible for ALL user generated content on Parler. Therefor by the same logic, Apple must be responsible for ALL actions taken by their phones. Every car bomb, every illegal cell phone conversation, every illegal crime committed […]

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Speak Out in 2021

 

As the train wreck of 2020 steams full speed into what we have every reason to expect will be the train wreck of 2021, I’ve been thinking about how I want to apply my limited time and energy in the new year. There are certainly plenty of issues that warrant attention. After all, no problems that dogged us last year have been solved; none has even grown smaller, and a brand new set of problems is scheduled to take office in just a couple of weeks, promising a tsunami of bad judgment and its inevitable consequences.

I’ve resolved to do my best to focus most of my attention on one issue, something I consider to be of paramount importance; more important even than our foolish panic over COVID, or the frankly idiotic trans movement, or the viciousness of Antifa and hateful dishonesty of BLM, or the barely concealed self-loathing of climate catastrophism.

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I’m one of those keep browser tabs open forever people, believing that I’ll eventually read that article, watch that video, or look up that band or song. The tab for this interview has been open (restoring my previous tabs whenever I restart my laptop) since April, and I finally watched this video today. This interview, […]

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Ep. 270 – Jeff Brain, CEO & Founder at CloutHub discusses how social media Tech Titans Facebook and Twitter used censorship to impact the Presidential Election. What is the future for the platforms, will Trump achieve changes for Section 230, and what does the future for Social Media look like with new platforms like CloutHub coming on strong.