Tag: career

The Right Place at the Right Time

 

Saturday evening, my wife and I were in our usual position – rocking chairs on the porch overlooking our neighbor’s hayfield and watching the lengthening shadows. Although we are nominally reading, we mostly look out at the waves across the hay. I happened to look up and saw a large bird high up in the air. It wasn’t flying like a vulture (which is a pretty common occurrence here). Then, I saw the white head and tail feathers – it was a bald eagle. We stood up and watched as it soared higher and higher until it flew west over Short Hill Mountain. It was only visible for about 30 seconds and if I hadn’t seen it in the 15 seconds it was visible from our chairs on the porch, we would have missed it.

We were in the right place at the right time.

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In Banter’s fifth installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, AEI Visiting Scholar Mark Schneider joined the show to discuss alternatives to the traditional bachelor’s degree, such as associate and certificate programs, and the differing earnings outcomes of these programs. This research was featured in the new report “Degrees of Opportunity: Lessons Learned from […]

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In Banter’s fourth installment of the “Bridging the Dignity Divide” series, John Bailey and Andy Smarick joined the show to share insights from their podcast, the New Skills Marketplace. In addition to discussing the skills gap, CTE programming, and charter schools, they discussed Smarick’s latest report, The Evolving High School CTE: New Jersey’s Distinctive Approach […]

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In Evelyn Waugh’s Scott-King’s Modern Europe, the title character, a classics teacher at a private school, is informed that not many students will be taking his class in the next term. “Parents are not interested in producing the ‘complete man’ any more,” the headmaster said. “They want to qualify their boys for jobs in the […]

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Seeking Arrested Development

 

I met one of those eager young things some time ago. We were on a train to Cambridge (England), and across from us was a pretty, very professional-looking young lady in her late 20s. I struck up a conversation, since I rarely resist the opportunity to harass a perfect stranger, and I love pretending that I am entirely unaware of social niceties and boundaries.

It turned out that she was American (of Asian descent) which explains why she did not know that in England, one does not simply talk to strangers on a train except to complain about something. And so we talked.

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Coffee Klatch and Gender Mortality

 

I walked into a coffee shop a few days ago for a ham and cheese croissant and a cup of drip coffee, black. Ahead of me stood a partially good-looking, partially unattractive, woman. I quickly figured out what it was that I found so unattractive. Her mouth was open. It wasn’t that her mouth was open per se. Like an open window that allows the neighbors to see inside a messy house, her mouth allowed for a disturbingly unfiltered view into the brain, due mostly to the words emerging therefrom.

She spoke with a man who wore a pair of those flat-front slacks; the sort of pants that a man wears when he wants to reassure anyone who is worried that he might have testicles. They tapered down smoothly to a pair of semi-casual, semi-dress (black with a hint of bright, faux-rebellious modernity) sneakers. Wrapped with meticulous sloppiness above his shoulders was a scarf that looked rather more like a leash around the neck of a Ken doll. He wore his head cocked passively to the side as his hands warmed gently on the nonfat half-shot-sugar-free vanilla soy latte, and on his face was a pair of scrunched-up eyes, contoured in an attempt to broadcast only the most sincere empathy, as bolstered by a periodic understanding nod.

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As some of you may know, though I don’t post often enough, I’m a school teacher. Being a conservative in education consists of a day to day struggle between biting your lip and losing the friendship/acquaintanceship of your co-workers. Furthermore, the job is incredibly restrictive in regards to upward mobility. If you like to be […]

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