Tag: Campaign Finance

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This may be a story worth paying attention to after the elections. Maybe even now. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-SC, is not just the chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee but also on the ballot for reelection. His opponent, Jaime Harrison, has raised a whopping $57 million in campaign contributions, dwarfing Graham’s fundraising. The same is […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Do You Donate?

 

It has been a while since I really thought about this, but since I am home with nothing better to do at the moment, I started thinking. How many of us donate to our political choices? When I get really fired up about a candidate, I have been known to donate. Recently, though, I can’t say that I have felt any compelling reason to donate.

I came across this site: WinRed.

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US Rep. Matt Gaetz, Republican from Florida’s panhandle, darling of Fox News aficionados and star among conservatives active on social media today spoke to the annual Conservative Political Action Conference (C-PAC) that is led by my friend and fellow conservative, Matt Schlapp. During his speech to the assembled and enthusiastic throng, Rep. Gaetz briefly took […]

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On October 4, 2019, the Gray Center co-hosted “The Administration of Democracy⏤The George Mason Law Review’s Second Annual Symposium on Administrative Law.” For the second annual symposium, scholars wrote papers on such fundamental questions as: Is nonpartisan campaign-finance regulation possible? Who should draw electoral maps—and how? How can we best protect voting rights? How should the census be administered? How do we preserve the regulatory process’s democratic legitimacy? And, are members of Congress entitled to see the President’s tax returns? These papers are forthcoming in the George Mason Law Review. In addition, the event featured a Keynote Conversation with two former public servants with deep expertise in both governance and campaigns: Robert Bauer, former White House Counsel to President Obama, and Donald McGahn, former White House Counsel to President Trump.

The keynote conversation featured Bauer, now at NYU Law School, and McGahn, currently a Partner at Jones Day, discussing the current state of political campaigns and elections, and whether reforms are needed. This session was moderated by the Gray Center’s Executive Director, Adam White. The video is available at http://administrativestate.gmu.edu/events/the-administration-of-democracy-the-george-mason-law-reviews-second-annual-symposium-on-administrative-law/.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice for utterly rejecting the suggestion from NBC’s Savannah Guthrie that Russian meddling may have tipped the 2016 election to President Trump – and explaining what really did happen. They also welcome the U.S. Supreme Court siding with the Trump administration in requiring asylum seekers to apply for asylum in any country they enter on the way to the U.S. And they pop the popcorn as the Biden campaign takes a swing at Elizabeth Warren and Marianne Williamson complains that the Democrats are meaner to her than conservatives. Finally, they figure out ways to tolerate a three-hour Democratic presidential debate tonight.

Myron Magnet joins Brian Anderson to discuss his new book, Clarence Thomas and the Lost Constitution.

Magnet contends that Justice Thomas’s originalist jurisprudence offers a path forward for recovering our nation’s “lost Constitution” and restoring America as a free, self-governing nation made up of self-reliant citizens.

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Scott Adams on Trump, Lewandowski and Campaign Finances He makes interesting points about Trump’s latest campaign moves, so I think it’s worth a read. Preview Open

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Can Anyone Here Offer an Antidote to More of the Usual Bile?

 

Screen Shot 2015-10-10 at 12.40.14 PMWith this graphic now on the front page of the New York Times online at this hour, a question:

Is there anyone here at Ricochet who knows his way around campaign finances? Might he be able to compile a rough comparison of the amounts that go to Republicans and Democrats, not from private individuals, but from unions?

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Jeb Unveils Latest Innovation in the Campaign Arms Race

 

This is cheeky:

DES MOINES, IowaJeb Bush is preparing to embark on an experiment in presidential politics: delegating many of the nuts-and-bolts tasks of seeking the White House to a separate political organization that can raise unlimited amounts of campaign cash.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Brief Research Bleg, or, the New York Times Could Use a Hand

 

Continuing its usual theme that corporations are wicked, that the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision will undermine democracy, and, well, blah, blah, blah, today the New York Times presents a story on a company that makes all its corporate contributions to Republicans:

The political action committee of Flowers Foods, a Georgia company that produces the pillowy sandwich bread [Wonder Bread], Tastykakes and Nature’s Own baked goods, has given more than 99 percent of its political contributions since 1979 to Republicans. Only three Democratic congressional candidates have gotten money from its PAC since 1984, and not one in the past 20 years.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. SCOTUS Campaign Finance Ruling: Right Outcome, Wrong Reasoning

 

Yesterday, the Supreme Court occasioned much gnashing of liberal teeth by striking down one more piece of the federal campaign finance laws. At issue was the fact that, while the law limited an individual’s contributions to any candidate to $2,600 per election, it also sets a ceiling of $48,600 in cumulative giving to candidates.