Tag: California

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Joel Kotkin joins Brian Anderson to discuss California’s economic performance since the Great Recession, the state’s worsening housing crunch, and the impending departure of Governor Jerry Brown, who will leave office in January. After serving four terms (nonconsecutively) since the late 1970s, Brown is one of the longest-serving governors in American history. While California has seen tremendous growth during Brown’s tenure, the state has big problems: people are […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Supreme Court Rules Vegan Restaurants in California Are Not Required to Give Diners Menus to Neighborhood Steak Restaurants

 

Well, not really, but that was the analogy I made in this post last November on the National Institute of Family and Life Advocates v. Becerra case where the state of California obliges pro-life pregnancy counseling centers seeking to encourage women not to have abortions to post the following notice:

California has public programs that provide immediate free or low-cost access to comprehensive family planning services (including all FDA-approved methods of contraception), prenatal care, and abortion for eligible women. To determine whether you qualify, contact the county social services office at [phone number of the local office].

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Engineering Failures: St. Francis Dam

 
St. Francis Dam nearly full.

I’ve been fascinated by the St. Francis Dam failure since I first found out about it. For those who are unaware of or who’ve forgotten about it, the St Francis Dam failure, which occurred in 1928, was the greatest civil engineering failure in the United States in the 20th century (the Johnstown Flood killed many more people, but it took place in 1889), and except for the San Francisco Earthquake, caused more deaths than any other event in California history. Until recently, however, it was relatively hard to find much information on the topic. There was a book about the disaster by a local retired rancher, Charles Outland, who had been a high school senior in Santa Paula at the time the St Francis flood waters raged through town, which was published in the early 1960’s, but that was about it. Since then a couple more books have been published and an engineering professor who has extensively studied the failure and developed a detailed analysis thereof has written and given talks on the subject so that it’s now possible to flesh out the subject in great detail (I’ll provide links to the books at the end of this article; all other links will be in the text). The most interesting aspect of the story to me, however, is the way in which this event touches on and impacts so many other stories.

Los Angeles Aqueduct

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America return with three crazy martinis. First, they shake their heads as President Trump tweets that those who died for our country would be really proud of his economic record. They also roll their eyes as liberal politicians and media figures express outrage over images […]

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In basketball parlance, the fourth and decisive quarter of this year’s election doesn’t commence until after Labor Day. But that doesn’t mean important trends haven’t developed. Hoover senior fellow and renowned pollster Doug Rivers explains what current survey data suggests about the political fortunes of President Trump, Republicans and Democrats. More

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The likelihood is that a Republican won’t even be on the ballot for governor of California come November. The state uses a primary system that only advances the top two vote-getters to the final round. It was signed off on by the state’s final Republican governor, Arnold Schwarzeneggar, as a way to defang the “Republican […]

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As I reported last week, the California gubernatorial race has two Republicans vying to get into second place in the upcoming June primary to face off against Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom in November. Well, now President Trump has weighed in with a tweet officially endorsing John Cox for Governor. This important endorsement could seal the […]

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. . . turns out you can always leave. This California employer is relocating to Idaho and taking many of his employees with him.  More

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Time constraints prevented me from posting this sooner but I still wanted to provide an update on what may be an interesting election year in California. More

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http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-43945522 It, or some vestage of it, has reached the border. I can’t find now where I was reading average-American comments over the weekend – I think somewhere on Facebook – but I was amazed at the anger and resentment towards this event. Comments centered around how most of the “asylum seekers” were men, not […]

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Victor Davis Hanson describes the philosophical conceits employed by defenders of illegal immigration — and explains how they’re undermining American society. More

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Sure, every statewide office in California is held by a Democrat. Sure, the Democrats have “reformed” the state’s election laws to make sure those offices remain Democrat in perpetuity. Sure, the up-and-coming California Democrats (Kamala Harris, Gavin Newsom, Kevin de Leon) are so far left they make Jerry Brown look like Jeb Bush. Sure, California […]

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A quarter of a century since the nation’s first charter school opened in Minnesota, a new administration in Washington speaks of “school choice.” Eric Hanushek, the Hoover Institution’s Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow, and Macke Raymond, a Hoover distinguished research fellow and director of the Stanford-based Center for Research on Education Outcomes (CREDO), discuss […]

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have fun with three different headlines, starting with the news that Florida GOP Gov. Rick Scott will run for U.S. Senate this year, possibly giving Republicans their best chance of winning that race. They also scratch their heads as Twitter CEO and supposed free […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Let’s Just Put Targets on Their Backs

 

Just when I think that California can’t propose anything more harmful and dangerous to law enforcement and its citizens, the lawmakers have come up with something even more outrageous:

Several lawmakers and the family of a 22-year-old unarmed black man who was fatally shot by police proposed Tuesday that California become the first state to significantly restrict when officers can open fire. The legislation would change the standard from using ‘reasonable force’ to ‘necessary force.’ That means officers would be allowed to shoot only if ‘there were no other reasonable alternatives to the use of deadly force’ to prevent imminent serious injury or death, said Lizzie Buchen, legislative advocate for the American Civil Liberties Union, which is among the groups behind the measure.

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The Department of Commerce issued a press release on the reinstatement of a citizenship question on the 2020 Census. On December 12, 2017, DOJ requested that the Census Bureau reinstate a citizenship question on the decennial census to provide census block level citizenship voting age population (CVAP) data that is not currently available from government […]

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Richard Epstein explains how public pensions came to be a ticking time bomb for states and cities throughout the U.S., what the financial ramifications are, and why the road to reform is so perilous. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Pension Abuse in California

 
Mark Janus, the plaintiff in Janus v. AFSCME.

One of the main themes in the blockbuster case of Janus v. AFSCME—currently before the United States Supreme Court—is the risk of having unions sit on both sides of the table in public-sector contract negotiations. Nowhere is that risk more pronounced than in California, where the perverse and pervasive effects of union political influence are on display in Cal Fire Local 2881 v. California Public Employees’ Retirement System, now before the California Supreme Court. Between 2009 and 2013, California law allowed state and local employees with over five years of service to purchase with their own funds up to five years of “fictional years of retirement service credits”—commonly called “airtime”—that they could then add to their years of actual service in order to increase the value of their pensions at retirement.

This novel airtime benefit was supposed to be cost-neutral to public employers, but it never was: each unit of airtime represented a huge windfall to the lucky state employees and a drain on the public treasury. The Public Employees’ Pension Reform Act of 2013 (PEPRA) sought to end the practice moving forward, without taking away airtime rights that had already been purchased by public employees. The union’s position is that the right to purchase future airtime rights was vested in all current employees on passage of the statute, so that PEPRA violates the state constitution’s contracts clause by preventing employees hired before 2013 from making purchases after 2013. The California Court of Appeal rebuffed that union effort by holding that the union did not meet its “elevated” burden of showing that the legislature had indeed intended to create these vested rights going forward. The California Supreme Court should follow suit.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Is The West Coast Lost? Not According to a Californian Named Ginny

 

I met Ginny in January, amidst a raucous gaggle of conservatives partying in LA one night last fall. A successful retired screenwriter, Ginny is a peppy, enthusiastic supporter of the idea that California, and the country, can be saved if conservatives will share resources and work together. Using her own savings, she founded Connect The Dots, a 501(c)4 devoted to getting conservatives to learn how to cooperate and communicate the ideas of conservatism more efficiently. A longtime California resident, she’s witnessed the rapid demise of freedom in California and is actually putting her money where her mouth is to try to fix it.

This Saturday, March 17, at the Burbank Airport Marriott, she’s sponsoring an ambitious event called Saving California, and it’s meant to shine a spotlight on the story of what conservatism looks like for the future, and how we can build a successful coalition, even on the Left Coast. David Horowitz, Bill Whittle, Evan Sayet, Internet sensation Alfonzo Rachel, and Turning Point’s Charlie Kirk will headline, and our own intrepid Whiskey Politics’ podcaster @Dave Sussman will be there to get the story and interview speakers and moderate panels. In addition, the controversial but wonderful L.A. street artist, SABO will have something special planned.

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