Tag: California

Join Jim and Greg as they salute Capitol Police Officer Eugene Goodman for his quick thinking in leading the mob away from the U.S. Senate on Wednesday. They also discuss the growing support for a recall of California Gov. Gavin Newsom, as California fails some of the most basic functions of government. And they point out that for all the alleged urgency towards another impeachment, congressional leaders seem to be pretty patient.

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2020 was a bad year for California, and worse if you were a resident of the state. California initiated a lockdown due to Covid-19 on March 20, 2020. At the time, Field Marshall Gavin said “…We project that roughly 56% of our state’s population — 25.5 million people will be infected with the virus over […]

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Join Jim and Greg as they wrap up the week with three big stories. First, they recoil at the radical anti-Israel statement from Georgia Democrat Raphael Warnock. They also fire back at the Democrat in Texas who wants to limit when you can defend your life and property. And they react to a Los Angeles Times editor urging Sen. Dianne Feinstein to resign so Gov. Gavin Newsom can appoint both black and Latino senators.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Resisting Tyranny: California

 

A search on Pearl Harbor Day stories led to a surprising find at SFGATE, a sister-site to the San Francisco Chronicle.* Consider the trending stories late on December 7, 2020. Three of the top seven stories are skeptical, critical of the Democrats running the state and of so-called public health experts. This is a small hopeful sign from the heart of the radical left’s territory.

Soumya Karlamangla, of the Los Angeles Times wrote: “Many aren’t buying California’s ‘stay-at-home’ message. Experts say there’s a better way.” Public officials need to stop crying wolf and issuing unreasonable, unbearable demands in the name of risk avoidance. Instead, they need to promote harm reduction messages, communicating with people as they are, not as someone wishes them to be.

The percentage of Angelenos staying home except for essential activities has remained unchanged since mid-June — around 55% — despite pleas from health officials in recent weeks for people to cut down on their activities, according to a survey conducted by USC….

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud a new ad urging voters to keep the GOP in control of the Senate. They also hammer a New York Times writer for complaining that conservative outlets are giving too much attention to the multiple nights of vandalism, looting, and violence in Philadelphia. And they unload on California Gov. Gavin Newsom for his utterly insane COVID rules for Thanksgiving or any other gathering.

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California has problems. There are high state taxes that politicians there want to increase even more, including a proposal for a state wealth tax. There are huge numbers of regulations that burden businesses, stifle growth, and make life generally difficult. There are restrictions on housing construction that drive up the cost of housing, now about […]

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Wayne Winegarden, Ph.D., Senior Fellow of Business and Economics for the Pacific Research Institute joins Carol Roth to discuss a free market approach to energy. He talks about why electric car subsidies help the rich, why overregulation hurts the poor and how Californians could save more than $2,000 a year if lawmakers enacted free market policies. Wayne and Carol talk about California’s rolling blackout problems and why big government is to blame, the big problem with solar energy that nobody is talking about, nuclear power and more.

Plus, a Now You Know segment on the Canary Islands. 

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up three martinis, including one bad one they think could end up being good. They discuss unions planning walkouts from teachers, truckers, government employees and others to demand things like Medicare for all, free rent, and defunding the police – but see tremendous potential for this tactic to backfire spectacularly. They also unload on Kamala Harris for reversing her position on fracking and noting her blatant pandering to Pennsylvania voters in the process. And they vent in reaction to a California wildfire starting from a pyrotechnic explosion at a gender-reveal party.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The California Homeless Urban Brushfire Fire Season Begins

 
Vacant lot on residential street near Downtown Los Angeles set ablaze after homeless encampment catches fire on the night of August 19, 2020.

As the only member of my family living in California – specifically, Los Angeles – I have to deal with the common misconceptions of the state: No, one does not go up to celebrities and start talking to them, even just to say how much one likes their work. No, locals generally don’t go to Hollywood; it’s an overpriced, touristy hellscape of traffic with no parking. And no, even if one does go to the beach (many don’t – that hellscape of traffic with no parking thing again), people only swim on the hottest days because the ocean here is icy cold.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Congress Can’t Afford to Bail Out High-Spending States

 

Gov. Andrew Cuomo (NY-D) speaks to union group. (Lev Radin / Shutterstock.com)
Congressional Democrats are doubling down on their demand that, in response to the coronavirus pandemic, the federal government must bail out free-spending states. There are several terrible ideas out there just now (destroying minority-owned businesses in the service of racial equality comes to mind), but this is one of the worst.

The crisis in problem states is fueled mainly by unfunded pension liabilities. Public employee unions and the politicians they elect have for decades promised lavish pensions to union members, far exceeding those paid to wealth-creating private-sector employees. But adequate funding was never provided and the over-optimistic financial market returns didn’t materialize. The result is a growing total of $4.9 trillion in contractually enforceable liabilities to state retirees. There is no way the states can make these payments.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Urban Un-Renewal: After Coronavirus and Black Lives Matter, Has the Bubble Burst in Downtown L.A.?

 
The Frank Putnam Flint monument on the south lawn of Los Angeles City Hall, facing the Los Angeles Police Department Headquarters, covered in anti-police graffiti. – 6/21/20

Despite decades of flagrant political and fiscal mismanagement, the cities along California’s coast have flourished. Even with the looming threat of unpaid liabilities to civil servants’ unions, an unrelenting drought, and a wave of homelessness that has swept down upon San Francisco and Los Angeles like the zombie apocalypse, nothing seemed to stop the push to develop more and more. The jeremiads against gentrification have grown louder and more desperate every year as, in L.A., more formerly poor and minority-dominated neighborhoods saw craft beer shops and vegan bakeries open among the 99¢ stores and check-cashing outlets. Nowhere was more symbolic of the success that Downtown L.A. itself: At the start of the millennium, the city’s historic and financial core was a ghost town after 6 P.M. and on weekends, its streets becoming eerie canyon of shuttered storefronts devoid even of the homeless.

Michael Gibson joins Brian Anderson to discuss San Francisco’s ongoing struggle with public order and his decision to leave the Bay Area for Los Angeles—the subject of Gibson’s story, “America’s Havana,” in the Spring 2020 issue.

“Even before the current Covid-19 pandemic,” writes Gibson, “San Francisco was a deeply troubled city.” The city ranks first in the nation in a host of property crimes, and its high housing costs make it prohibitively expensive for low- and middle-income families. Even tech companies are now considering relocating their operations; any significant exodus of such businesses would be a serious blow to the city’s economy.

It’s the first-ever al fresco edition of the Three Martini Lunch! Join Jim and Greg as they welcome encouraging news on the search for the coronavirus and that experts believe the economy might start improving in June. They also roll their eyes as California Gov. Gavin Newsom says the federal government must bail out his state or else first responders will be the first ones laid off. And they fire back at a Washington Post opinion writer who claims Americans would do much better against the coronavirus if we weren’t so skeptical of government and protective of our liberties.

Hey, we made it to Friday! Join Jim and Greg as they applaud cities and states for gearing up for the worst of coronavirus before it hits. They also cringe as Washington, D.C., officials claim the COVID-19 peak may not come there until late June or early July. And they call for a common sense review as sheriff’s officials in southern California arrest a man for defying state orders by paddle boarding in the ocean by himself.

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Following Super Tuesday’s romp by Joe Biden, there seemed to be a bit of a cooling among Republicans about their prospects of retaking control of the House of Representatives. It wasn’t a lack of confidence in winning back seats, but there seemed to be too much emphasis placed on a Bernie Sanders nomination dragging down-ballot […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Hi everyone! I’m new here. I usually hang out on Twitter, but decided to check out Ricochet. I just wanted to share an article/video from Reason Magazine about California’s AB5 bill which restricts freelancers, including people like me. Writers can only write 35 articles a year per publication. It’s dystopian. California leads the way in […]

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