Tag: California

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer Iowa becoming the latest state to pass sweeping school choice legislation which gives parents more options on where and how to educate their kids and creates more competition for our schools. They also groan as New York City Mayor Eric Adams complains about the burden placed on his city to deal with the flood of people who entered the nation illegally. The buses from red state governors are a drop in the bucket compared to the numbers of migrants being shuttled all over the nation by the federal government. They also react to Rep. Adam Schiff’s TikTok video complaining about his ouster from the House Intelligence Committee, which he immediately turned into a fundraising pitch just in time for his new campaign for the U.S. Senate.  And Jim reacts to the speculation that Aaron Rodgers could be headed to the New York Jets.

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This is something I overheard a California expat say about her new digs in the Lone Star State. Hailing as I do from the frozen north where look askance at anything spicier than sharp cheddar I figure I’m unqualified to judge. On this Taco Tuesday, the holiest of the holy days of the Taco Week, […]

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Federalist Radio Hour Host Emily Jashinsky is in for Jim today. Emily and Greg start by dissecting the left’s full meltdown over Twitter suspending several journalists on the left for violating the new doxxing rules. They also discuss the impact Twitter has in exposing media bias and whether Elon Musk’s actions break his pledge to champion free speech. They’re also furious as Philadelphia public schools plan to impose a mask mandate on students when they return in January just as the damage done to poor and minority students in California from being out of school becomes clearer. Finally, they wonder what exactly Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg does following reports he was vacationing in Portugal just a week before the nation was threatened with an economy-crippling railroad strike.

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Episode 5 – Buc-ee’s is the funniest yet. If you have any connections with Texas but haven’t caught Babylon Bee’s video series on the California couple moving to Texas, you ought to catch up. The episode released yesterday (November 21) is in my opinion the funniest yet. They discover Buc-ee’s.  Preview Open

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Reading a piece from PJ Media this morning meant to be criticism of media collusion with Democrats, I read that California had back to back years of budget surpluses up near $98 billion before reporting a deficit this year (thanks Joe Biden!) of $25 billion. Not sure what total outstanding debt is or whether those […]

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It’s official: Pretty much the entire country has succumbed to Californication. The Bitter Clingers have been driven into a corner on a small southern peninsula, but most of them will be killed off by the superhurricanes created by Climate Change®, and what few survivors remain will be eaten by the Everglades python horde. So embrace […]

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The sheer chutzpah of this scheme: Enforce an “eviction moratorium” to force landlords to keep deadbeat tenants in their properties because of a “housing emergency.” When landlords go bankrupt, state and local governments buy out the “distressed properties” using Federal bailout funds. The now government-owned properties are converted into housing for homeless. The Los Angeles […]

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‘California’: A Synonym for Dysfunction

 

My favorite part of this story is how the French company hired to help build California’s High-Speed Choo-Choo ultimately quit in frustration. Essentially, they said, “California, your government is too corrupt and dysfunctional, so we’re going to work with an African country instead.”

The even better part; the African high-speed train was completed in 2018. California’s project might get done near the end of this century, if it gets done at all.

California’s Fast-Food Fumble

 

On September 5, California Governor Gavin Newsom lent his hearty endorsement to California’s FAST Recovery Act (short for Fast Food Accountability and Standards Recovery Act), which has been widely praised—and chastised—for its intention to raise minimum wages for the industry from $15 to as much as $22 per hour, the highest in the nation, with further increases in the offing. The major discussion over this new law has been directed to the perennial question of whether the loss in employment from its adoption will more than offset the salary gains to the workers able to maintain their positions within the industry. That is not likely, in my view, given the huge jump in mandated wages, which will make for a difficult transition period.

In dealing with this peculiar calculus, moreover, the inevitable losses in industry profits are given little or no weight in the economic evaluation of the law, on the implicit assumption that while the wage increases may put a dent in firm earnings, they will not drive all fast-food providers into bankruptcy—high-end operations are likely to be better able to weather the storm. It is also assumed that any increase in prices passed on to consumers will be borne with good grace, though many customers of the fast-food industry have marginal wage and income profiles not all that different from the workers (or at least those who retain their jobs) inside the industry.

The common assumption is that the only recourse available to deal with this new threat to the industry is a referendum to overturn the law, which would require the collection and validation of 623,000 signatures by December 4, 2022, for the referendum to appear on the ballot. Such an effort would attempt to replicate the successful 2020 initiative Proposition 22, which was designed to exempt companies like Uber, Lyft, and DoorDash from a California law that reclassified their drivers as employees entitled to all sorts of protections not made available to independent contractors.

Join Jim and Greg as they cheer a very strong ad from Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis that uses Floridians from all walks of life mentioning how his policies have made their lives better. They also are intrigued to see the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette call our John Fetterman for being unable to take part in debates and the New York Times start to lay expectations for the defeat of Stacey Abrams in Georgia. Finally, they shake their heads at the left looking to California as the leaders in progressive energy policy…only to see California suffering rolling blackouts and and energy restrictions as a heat wave rolls in.

Meanwhile, in the People’s Republic of California

 

The Governor of the one-party state of California has designs on running for president in 2024. Newsom claims to be a big proponent of ‘freedom.’  And touts his state’s efforts to protect the freedom to kill unborn babies up until the minute of birth.  But his California is also a place where one has the freedom to loot a local business without consequences. Californians have the freedom to defecate in the street of any major city.   Thanks to the ruling party’s reforms, people with HIV have the freedom to spread the virus to others. California, it seems, is just bursting with freedom.

Oh, but you won’t have the freedom to buy a gasoline-powered car. That will be illegal as of 2035. Oh, and if you own a hotel, the city of Los Angeles may soon force you to put up vagrants in any vacant room.

Join Jim and Greg as they serve up two bad martinis and a crazy one. First, they groan as the Biden administration foolishly pursues a new Iran nuclear deal that in several ways would be even worse than the original. They also fume as California lays out plans to ban the sale of gasoline-powered cars by 2035, explain how electric vehicles are a thoroughly unacceptable option for millions of Americans, and how government has no business forcing options on us that we don’t want. And they have a LOT to say about the Biden administration’s rollout of its plan to force Americans who didn’t take out student loans or have paid them off to cover those costs for others.

What Do Electric Vehicles and Eating Insects Have in Common?

 

Channeling his inner Marie Antoinette and demonstrating an example of the Biden Administration’s unparalleled tone-deafness a few weeks ago, US Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg has simple advice for combatting higher gasoline prices: Buy an electric car.

At least he hasn’t advised us to eat more insects yet. But it may be only a matter of time. The same interests and climate cultists pushing EVs also encourage you to eat bugs. Behind all this is a punitive and bizarre economic and cultural agenda. More sustainable for the planet, they claim, as they move us towards a “net zero emissions economy” by 2050. If not sooner. More about that later.

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I’m putting out an all call for people with experience here. I’m out of FMLA.  I’m on Medical leave now for a work-based injury.  Like most nurses, I messed up my back.  Unlike most nurses, I did it in a static way, so there’s no structural damage on my imaging.  It’s just causing migraines 3 […]

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California’s Reparations Report

 

A while back, there was a news alert on my phone that the Committee finally decided to release its preliminary report.  As expected, reparations are to be extraordinarily broad and far-reaching, impacting multiple industries rather than just the personal items of descendants of slaves.

No one should be surprised by this.

What I was surprised by is how quickly this alert and topic dropped off of my phone with nary a trace.  I had to do an internet search to find further information (including recent news articles about it) and to see what the actual recommendations are.

California’s Reparations Overreach

 

With Assembly Bill 3121, passed in 2020, the California state legislature created a task force whose purpose is to “study and develop reparation programs for African-Americans.” On June 1, 2022, that task force issued its lengthy interim report, with an executive summary, which together will divide rather than inform the highly fraught public at large. What is desperately needed today are programs of market liberalization that will raise the welfare of all groups, without seeking to play one off against the other.

But the task force has no such general recommendations. Instead, it chooses to examine complex historical events that took place from the onset of slavery in the United States until the present day. That untidy inquiry should mix together developments of both cruelty and heroism. Had the task force proceeded in a more responsible manner, it would have started with the proposition that many groups—racial and otherwise—have been mistreated and can make, and have made, claims for reparations. And it also should have explicitly acknowledged that at no point in our nation’s history have any such expansive reparations programs been enacted.

Misunderstanding Korematsu

Jim Geraghty is back! Join Jim and Greg as they welcome news of Asian voters souring on President Biden in big numbers. They also react to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers differing forecasts on whether we are headed for a recession. And they shake their heads as California gets set to hike gas taxes with prices already at record highs.

California State of Dysfunction

 

I’ve lived in California since 1964 except for a two-year tour of duty in 1990. I had started Kindergarten in Lansing, MI (where I wept every morning to the growing frustration of the teacher), but within ten weeks of having arrived to live with my grandparents and my dad to begin his job with the Lansing Parks Department, we were once again packing up the homemade trailer and heading for Sacramento.

Brown-the-father was the governor, the State of California’s government footprint was tiny, and the population was some fraction of what it is today.

Although I was born in Kittery, ME (or Portsmouth, NH, depending upon which records you have), I discovered during my two-year tour of duty on my beloved east coast … that I am by nature a California girl. That means I love the climate, the beauty of the mountains, the cold winds of the northern coast, and the spirit of the artists that barely remain in Mendocino. As for the politics, I wasn’t paying attention much until I retired. My bad.