Tag: Business

Member Post

 

Movie theaters are going bankrupt around the country. Say what you will about tone-deaf Hollywood. This isn’t a result of clueless executives and film makers. The industry isn’t self-destructing. Politicians and journalists are killing it with pandemic precautions unbalanced with any other concerns. What will happen to all the closed theaters? They will remain unoccupied. […]

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How Washington Can Boost American Entrepreneurship

 

Entrepreneurs play a critical role in the American economy. The new businesses they launch provide new goods and services. They also provide existing goods and services more efficiently, forcing incumbents to do a better job through competition. And while most media attention seems devoted to potentially high-impact technology startups, regular “mom and pop” businesses can be important mechanisms for upward mobility. We want a dynamic economy where labor and capital can be employed as productively as possible. Entrepreneurship plays a big role in making that happen.

It remains to be seen how entrepreneurs navigate the post-pandemic economy. But before the coronavirus outbreak, there were several disturbing long-term trends about America’s startup superpower. Among them: New businesses have become a smaller share of all companies than they used to be, as well as their share of total employment. These trends are illustrated in “Federal Policies in Response to Declining Entrepreneurship,” a new Congressional Budget Office report on the subject:

Heather Zumarraga, President of Zuma Global and the author of The Man’s Guide to Corporate Culture joins Carol Roth to discuss the new reality for being a man (or a woman) in the workplace, and how to navigate it. From dating to other secret “rules”, Heather shares the ways that you can ensure to keep yourself out of trouble, avoid reputational damage and still be able to mentor colleagues. 

Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on fashion indicators in the stock market.

Carol Roth goes solo to cover her biggest post-election concerns, regardless on who wins, encompassing the size of government, spending, the Fed, the state of small business and more.

You can connect with Carol on Twitter @CarolJSRoth.

Host Joe Selvaggi talks with Pioneer Institute’s Andrew Mikula and Retailers Association of Massachusetts’ Jon Hurst about the state of small business in Massachusetts six months into the pandemic. They discuss the observations and recommendations of Pioneer’s new report, “The Long View: A Public Policy Roadmap for Saving Small Businesses During the COVID-19 Recovery Period.”

Interview Guest

Rob Long is in for Jim today. He and Greg appreciate the climate change crowd joining other far left activists in admitting what we’ve known for decades – that their real goal is to kill capitalism. Rob also tears into New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for his ongoing celebration of himself and for claiming people from other states are now flocking to New York to be safe from the virus. Rob also explains why countless New York businesses are on the brink of collapse because of Cuomo’s callousness. And they have fun with Berkeley, California’s decision to have unarmed civilian city workers make traffic stops instead of police.

Dan Granger, Founder and CEO of Oxford Road, a leading advertising agency specializing in audio and all things spoken media and audio-tech/media technology, joins Carol Roth to talk about marketing amidst the insanity that is 2020. Dan talks about what tactics should be thrown out the window, why “ease of use” trumps just about everything in today’s environment and the “if, then shaming fallacy” happening on social media and otherwise. Dan and Carol also talk about why Bill Burr’s genius podcast advertising live reads are so effective, and why some companies still want control.

Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on Independence Day.

Let’s Gas Up at the Gas-a-Teria!

 
Gilmore Gas-a-Teria at night 1948

In 1948, the first self-serve gas station was opened in the United States. The station was in Los Angeles, the car capital of the country, on Beverly Boulevard just past Fairfax Avenue and was operated by Gilmore Oil. Gilmore Oil was a large, local oil and gas company well known in southern California. Gilmore called these self-service stations “Gas-a-Teria’s”. The Gas-a-Teria was a massive station for the time featuring eight islands with three pumps per island. The self-serve gas saved the customer five cents per gallon and the attendants at the station were young women.

Exavier Pope is a tremendous success, but you may not have guessed that he went from foster care to living on the streets to eventually media personality, serial entrepreneur, attorney, business and legal analyst, Fortune 500 speaker, content creator, writer, tastemaker, licensed yoga instructor— and the best dressed man on TV. 

Exavier joins Carol Roth to talk about his stories, his struggles and his “4 P’s” for success. He shares how anyone can make a bigger difference and overcome even the worst situations and why thinking you are “special” can actually be an asset. Plus, he shares thoughts on mentoring and helping the youth who are in bad situations through no fault of their own.

Les McKeown is the Founder and CEO of Predictable Success and a trusted advisor to fast-growth SMEs and thriving not-for-profits as well as Fortune 500 companies and some of the largest government agencies in the world. Having been involved in the launch of more than 40 companies before he was 35, he joins Carol Roth to talk about why the COVID-19 crisis is different than any other he has seen for businesses and what they should do. Les and Carol also discuss the impact of coronavirus and government action (and inaction) on the economy.

Plus, a “Now You Know” segment on St. Patrick’s Day.

In this episode, Host Joe Selvaggi is joined by Pioneer Research Analyst Rebecca Paxton to get reactions to Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker’s phased reopening, from the leaders of two statewide business organizations, NFIB and Retailers Association of Massachusetts. The guests share their concerns and disappointment with Gov. Baker’s plan, contending that good policy requires us to trust business leaders to protect the needs and safety of their clientele.

Guests:

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome more help from Congress to help small businesses stay afloat. They also shudder at a new poll showing 75 percent of seniors don’t even want non-essential workers to be allowed outside. And they discuss the significance of learning coronavirus was here and killing people earlier than we thought.

A true Renaissance man and one of the original “Mad Men,” Hank Wasiak is a communications industry leader with five decades of experience that took him to and through the corporate boardrooms of the marketing world’s global businesses elite, including as Vice Chairman of McCann Erickson WorldGroup. He is a founding partner at The Concept Farm, Ad Age’s Small Agency of the Year Winner, bestselling author, keynote speaker and three-time Emmy award winning television host. He has taught at six universities and been in the classroom with successive next generations of marketers for almost fifty years. For the past ten years Hank has been an adjunct professor at the University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business.

Hank joins Carol Roth to talk about why companies shouldn’t go “woke,” what he wrote to the CEO of Gillette, navigating social media, rage mobs and cancel culture, Bernie Bros and the current state of students, among other topics. He also talks about leveraging asset-based thinking. Plus, a “Now You Know” piece with a toilet paper test for you!

Have you thought about changing your profession, but don’t know where to start? Have you created revenue streams apart from your day job to diversify your income? Dorie Clark, Author, Keynote Speaker and CEO of Clark Strategic Communications joins Carol to give practical strategies and tactics for your professional future, from her bestselling books Reinventing You and Entrepreneurial You. Plus, a “Now You Know” piece on the real story behind the “Howard Dean Scream”.

Dorie Clark also teaches for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business and Columbia Business School. She knows a lot about reinvention– a former presidential campaign spokeswoman, Clark has been described by the New York Times as an “expert at self-reinvention and helping others make changes in their lives.” She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, and consults and speaks for clients such as Google, Yale University, and the World Bank. She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School, a producer of a multiple Grammy-winning jazz album, and a Broadway investor.

You asked the questions and Carol Roth answered them! From investing and business to politics to personal, Carol answered your serious—and not so serious—questions. Plus, “Now You Know” trivia from ancient Rome.

Member Post

 

What novels, memoirs, and films with a business setting do you like? Most fiction seems to be about people who are lawyers, policemen, criminals, soldiers, spies, students, politicians, and noble but struggling writers. But there are indeed some works of fiction, and some vivid personal memoirs, in which business plays a central role without being […]

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Serial entrepreneur Paul Shrater returns to moderate a discussion with Carol Roth on the future of entrepreneurship. Paul and Carol talk about the shifts in entrepreneurship and marketing, future growth industries and address the issues with Universal Basic Income (UBI) as a platform.

Paul’s businesses include Minimus.biz, Minimus fulfillment and Minimus brands, and his clients range from major celebrities to NASA. He even manages the fulfillment for Carol’s Future File® legacy planning system.

Stian Westlake joins City Journal editor Brian Anderson to discuss the future of productivity and how institutions and policymakers can adapt to the new “intangible” economy.

Throughout history, as documented in the book Capitalism Without Capital by Westlake and coauthor Jonathan Haskel, firms have invested in physical goods like machines and computers. As society has grown richer, companies have invested increasingly in “intangible” assets: research and development, branding, organizational development, and software. Today’s challenge is to build the institutions and enact the policies that will maximize the new economy’s potential.