Tag: bridget phetasy

Eliza Bleu is a survivor advocate for those affected by human trafficking, she’s also a survivor of human trafficking. She and Bridget discuss the red flags both parents and youths should be aware of, grooming tactics and how insidious they can be – especially from someone you’re supposed to be able to trust, the fraught conversation around personal responsibility in the survivor space, and the role advancing technology and social media platforms play. They share personal stories of their own experiences, how the most innocuous things can be triggers, how trauma never fully heals, but it can be integrated, why you have to take care of yourself when you’re trying to serve others, trying not to let the darkness overwhelm you,  hanging onto hope, and why you should never ugly-cry on Rogan.

Mitchell Jackson stops by and talks about his beloved friend and surrogate mother, Sandie Crisp, aka The Goddess Bunny, a disabled trans icon. She died in January of Covid, after surviving polio and HIV.  Mitchell discusses the ups and downs of her life, stints of homelessness, having her picture hanging in the Louvre, why she’s huge in South America, her hatred of identity politics, the surrogate family she built for herself, and the tragedy of her passing in isolation (due to Covid restrictions) in an assisted living facility. He and Bridget discuss the massive flaws in our system regarding the health and care of the homeless, disabled, mentally ill, and people struggling with addiction. They cover the battle to hold a funeral that did Sandie proud, how she raged against the idea that anyone would ever perceive her as a victim, and why Mitchell is optimistic about the future.

Candice Thompson is a comedian, writer, actor and host of the podcast Nosy Neighbors which breaks down the  most absurd neighborhood app posts of the week. She and Bridget discuss how everybody wants to label you so they know what to think about you, why they don’t trust groups, their paths to stand-up comedy, their worst comedy bomb experiences, why hemp is the buffalo of plants, normalizing knife fights, and why people are so staunch in their defense a celebrity they’ve never met. Candice shares her experience being a light skinned black girl, and the complexities of being mixed race in a country obsessed with race, her exploration of nutrition and spirituality, and why she got kicked out of a wedding for a stand-up set. It’s a hilarious conversation that goes from lentils to racism to fat shaming, why our bodies are miracles, people who take pride in their victimhood, and the etiquette of throwing away dog poop.

Sarah Rose Siskind is a science comedy writer, psychedelic educator, comedian, and co-founder of Hello SciCom, a company that combines science communication and comedy to help scientists and tech companies revamp their content. She and Bridget discuss homelessness, how little we knew in our 20s, sobriety & pharmaceuticals, why D.A.R.E. is a terrible program, pandemic-induced anxiety, why mental health issues are like spousal abuse, and why people shouldn’t treat weed as a cure-all. They swap crazy Burning Man stories, discuss classism, agree that art is one of the things humans do right, commiserate over comedian-brain, and highlight the importance of knowing your audience in any given situation.

Julian Walker is a yoga instructor, writer, and co-host of the podcast Conspirituality. He and Bridget discuss the growing overlap between new age spirituality and conspiracy theory culture in the last few years, how QAnon-influenced ideas started to take hold in the yoga space, the growing trend of anti-intellectualism and shying away from science, the difference between freshman skepticism and healthy skepticism, and why he’s committed to the principle that politics should be boring. Julian talks about growing up in South Africa amid the dismantling of apartheid and the perspective it gave him about reality bubbles, authoritarianism, propaganda, and what a charismatic candidate that arouses a passionate response in their followers means in a society. They talk empathy, morality, purity, cults, gurus, political stability, and why we should give people the benefit of the doubt in conversation rather than going from zero to calling them a Nazi in two seconds.

Angel Eduardo is a writer, musician, photographer and artist. He and Bridget discuss the discipline of being a professional artist, the moral panic around art these days, self-censorship and the fear of being cancelled, victimhood culture, exercise & discipline, Bridget’s ideal super power, why mistakes are like wrapping paper, what to do when you’re lost, and the ground we’re losing in the equality movement. Angel explains his concept of “star-manning,” a way of engaging in discourse with each other that acknowledges a person’s point of view and their intentions in a conversation as a means of finding common ground, making them feel heard, and making them more likely to listen to you in return. He believes that most people mean well, and we often lose sight of that fact and depersonalize them in a disagreement, particularly over social media. Learn more about Angel on his website, angeleduardo.com.

Stand-up comic, Erica Rhodes, stops in to trade stories with Bridget about their various adventures that always seemed to start with “there was a boy…”. They discuss the winding roads that brought them to comedy, why spoken word poetry is a lot harder than you might think, acting as a gateway drug, the joys of creativity, the embarrassment of journals full of men, and their struggles with love and commitment. They also cover therapists who flirt with you, the nightmare of online dating, Bridget’s “one headshot per couple” rule, Erica’s tactic of playing dumb which allows her to see who people really are, losing people close to you, searching for validation, and why what you think you want in a relationship is very different from what you actually need in a relationship. Don’t miss Erica’s new comedy special La Vie En Rhodes.

Heather Heying is a scientist, educator and author. She and Bridget discuss the possibility of a vaccine passport and why they’re so unsettled by the idea. They reflect that nothing good comes from being told that in order to do something you have to show your papers, that once you give up a certain amount of liberty or power, it’s much more difficult to get it back, how being against the idea of a vaccine passport does not make you an anti-vaxxer, and the dangers of being called a conspiracy theorist when you dare to ask questions. They also cover the death of credibility, why you should spend time in nature moving fast, how it’s easy to radicalize people when they’re lost, why Joe Rogan is so awesome, and why we should all remember that on some level, we’re all self-righteous hypocrites. Be sure to check out Heather’s podcast with her husband Bret Weinstein, DarkHorse Podcast.

Nick Gillespie is the host of The Reason Interview podcast and editor-at-large at Reason Magazine. He and Bridget discuss the need to create meaning in our lives and why this has driven a lot of American culture insane, how he became a libertarian, Burning Man, his time working for a teen magazine, and why we need a government that does fewer things, but does them well. He shares how attending high school graduations and zoning board meetings radicalized him, the difference between liberals and progressives, how we can build a robust culture by having more arguments, and how he learned almost anything is possible. He and Bridget cover their hope for the future, why Walter Kronkite sucked, the consequences of growing up comfortable, and the truth behind our political parties’ ideologies.

Nancy Rommelman, journalist & author, sits down with Bridget for an in-depth conversation about her feature for Reason Magazine The Dream of The 90’s Dies in Portland, covering the Portland protests. They discuss what the endgame is for people whose skill set only involves destruction, how people are starting to behave in real life the way they do online, how people can become addicted to their “quest for justice,” the reality of what happens when you’ve been cancelled, and why your attitude after experiencing adversity is everything. They also cover the danger of a subscriber model when saying outrageous things and playing the victim gets you attention and an audience, the disconcerting current attitude of trying to pull everybody down rather than lifting them up, how when you weaponize terms you shut down the ability to have conversations, and their hope that the woke will go to sleep eventually. Subscribe to Nancy’s substack Make More Pie.

Cherie DeVille is an adult film star who offers Bridget an inside look at today’s porn industry. They cover how Cherie got into porn, how her parents reacted, why she loves it, the secret to her decade-long career, the perception versus the reality of the industry, the social stigma that comes with it, how it’s changed in the last 10 years, and how women have more power and control in the industry than ever before. They also discuss having an emotionally monogamous relationship, shame, boundaries, the struggle of kids today, how damaging porn addiction can be, the fact that conservatives and pornstars are on the same side when it comes to the arbitrary control and restrictions that financial institutions have over one’s ability to sell a product, and why we should all be terrified of what this means for the future.

Jeff Charles is a political commentator, podcast host, and freelance writer. He and Bridget discuss a variety of issues including why Republicans seem more interested in making it more difficult to vote than winning over hearts & minds, how even though most conservatives aren’t racist, they fall into a trap that lets the left paint them as racist, why the far left doesn’t really care about black people, and why you’re not that likely to be killed by a black person. They cover hot topics like Dr. Seuss and Gina Carano, along with more nuanced topics like why most black people don’t want to defund the police – they want the police to be held accountable, why Jeff believes conservatives will come around to the idea of black outreach, why Republicans should be advocating for reparations when Democrats will never do it, and wonder how many black farmers there actually are in America. Check out Jeff’s YouTube channel Breaking Conservatarian.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali is a research fellow, former member of the Dutch parliament, and author of the new book Prey: Immigration, Islam and the Erosion of Women’s Rights. She shares her story with Bridget and discusses fleeing an arranged marriage, seeking asylum in the Netherlands, the methods women in oppressive countries have developed to cope with or avoid being harassed, and the failure that occurs in our society when women don’t feel safe. She and Bridget have a fascinating conversation ranging from the homelessness problem in the US, to the effect the failure to assimilate the refugees in European countries is having on public safety – especially for women, and the fact that any conversation about these topics is considered taboo and likely to get you slapped with the label of classist, racist, or Islamophobic. They cover why critical race theory is a toxic ideology, how individuals are no longer being held responsible for their own actions, “white flight,” how men don’t have the same experience of feeling like prey, where feminists have gone wrong, and why America has done more things right than wrong.

Bridget and Jeren sit down to discuss their recent trip to South Africa. They discuss traveling during Covid, the importance of leaving the United States on a regular basis, what you learn when you travel internationally, their families’ attitudes towards traveling growing up, and their adventures in the wildlife parks they visited. They also get into the differences for traveling between men and women, an emotional helicopter ride, saving the rhinos, and trying to devise ways to protect themselves in the event of a lion attack.

Story Hour with Bridget Phetasy is a segment where Bridget reminisces with cousin Maggie and tells stories explaining who she is and how she got here.

Bridget’s globe trotting tales really kick off with the first leg of her months-long journey. Hear how a spontaneous opportunity to go to Burning Man, led to a weed farm in Oregon, to an ashram in Australia, and wwoofing on a horse farm in New Zealand. The many adventures and mishaps along the way include knowing her way around Sydney exclusively via boat, accidentally joining a sex cult in the Australian bush, crashing a party of entrepreneurs in New Zealand, and why a backpack full of mini-dresses and the gift of gab will get you far on your travels.

Yannis Pappas (stand-up comic) stops by to mock everyone and everything with Bridget, including: Bill Gates, white people presenting as POC, China, Tom Cruise, the two cults running this country, Scandinavians, and comedians being taken seriously as political pundits. He and Bridget also cover how things have changed since he became a dad, what Kurt Cobain would be like if he were still alive today, their ideas for reality shows, the ability of the Irish to repress their emotions, Joe Rogan’s stamina, why oxy is a man’s drug, and why everyone should drop out of college and start a podcast. Special guest appearance by Tim Dillon.

Sarah Tollemache, stand-up comic and podcast host, joins Bridget for a hilarious conversation about anything and everything, including what they miss about live stand up, defending their right to be hyperbolic, worrying about being caught in the background of a viral video that would get them cancelled, and their shared fascination of black market arms dealing and money laundering. They discuss their ability to create for themselves rather than the gatekeepers, why corporations that stand up to woke public pressure tend to be European, the stereotypes of traveling, why Bridget should go into PR to advised celebrities who are being cancelled, and swap restaurant industry horror stories. Check out Sarah’s podcast Vadge here.

Kmele Foster is a partner at Free Think, a media company that tells stories about the people and ideas that are changing the world, he’s also a co-host of The Fifth Column podcast. He and Bridget discuss the weirdness of signs like “Black People Welcome Here,” and how they give him a Get Out sort of feeling, what he would teach kids about media literacy right now, why he prefers lukewarm takes over hot takes, and the worrying trend that violence has become a clear attribute of our politics recently, that it isn’t going away, and isn’t only coming from one side. They cover using ridicule as an effective weapon, how easy it is to become what you hate, encouraging people to be brave, and wonder happens in a society when people don’t trust each other and are being trained to hate each other. Check out The Fifth Column podcast here.

Ryan Long, comedian and filmmaker, connects with Bridget from New York and they discuss his move from Canada five months before the pandemic hit, why NYC is a sadboy town, the challenges of being a self-starter and your own boss, the outrage economy, why good editors are so hard to find, and why Canada is dead to him. In the middle of their conversation Bridget receives breaking news of the lockdown at the Capitol on January 6th but that doesn’t derail the conversation. They delve into how Hollywood woke culture feels like a last ditch attempt  to maintain their status as gatekeepers, why Millennials are really just young Boomers in disguise, the difference between British comedy, American comedy, and Australian comedy, and how finding a way to turn something you might get mad about into something funny is a means of undermining your anger.

Adrienne Iapalucci is a stand-up comic, podcast host, and Bridget’s “spirit human.” She and Bridget discuss how their dysfunctional childhoods are probably what led them to stand-up in the first place and what keeps them grinding long after most normal people would quit. They talk addiction, the stand-up scene in NYC vs LA, their shared belief that things will always get worse, and why they both default to dark comedy the darker things get. Adrienne tells stories about working for a collections agency, Bridget shares how she learned the lesson you should never read someone else’s journal the hard way. They discuss how comedy has changed in today’s political climate and wonder if it’s better to achieve massive success with the wealth that comes with it only to watch it all slip away, or to live a moderately successful life being able to do what you love, but never “making it.” Stream or buy Adrienne’s latest album Baby Skeletons.