Tag: Books

Quote of the Day: Beer and Books

 

“Beer is to dumb guys what books are to smart ones — Just having a lot of them makes you feel a whole lot smarter.” — Stephen Pastis

There is a lot of truth in both ends of that quote.  Drink enough beer and you do feel smarter.  You may not be smarter and you may not act smarter, but sure enough you feel a whole lot smarter.  It doesn’t matter if you are a dumb guy or a smart guy, either – at least not in my experience.

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After a Christmas and New Year’s hiatus, we return to the halls of the Ricochet Grand Library. Chapter 59 saw Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubrey bring home the golden laurels (and hearty fruitcake, don’t forget) for the best crossover that never was for Seawriter, who asks: What was the best fictional story with aviation as […]

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Looking at the lists of books in Mr. Scrubb’s post I’ve got a challenge for y’all: At any meetup you see me at this year ask me how many books I’ve read, year-to-date. If you’ve read more than me I’ll buy you a drink. If you got there without padding the list with seven hundred […]

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The Christmas trees are twinkling with fairy lights (and real live fairies) and looking very spruce fir all that,[1] the halls are decked, the stockings hung, and the fireplaces glowing. Overhead, you might fancy, sleigh bells ring (are you listening?) as snowflakes whisper down outside. Welcome once again to the Ricochet Grand Library Christmas lounge. […]

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Books I Should Be Reading

 

Last year I posted a list of books I was hoping to read over the coming year, and invited y’all to chip in with suggestions. Thank you for your help. I figured I should report back as to what I actually read this year. Okay, that’s part of it, but mostly I’ve been tarrying overlong in giving my Mom a Christmas list. If you have suggestions, I’m sure she’d appreciate them. Right, let’s start with books from that post that I’ve actually read.

Books I Read Last Year

The Horatio Hornblower series, by C.M. Forrester. I’ve read the first three of these so far, will pick up the others as time allows. I enjoyed them quite a bit, first because they’re solid adventure stories, and second because some of the devices are genuinely  new to me. If you recall the rice from Mr. Midshipman Hornblower you’ll know what I mean. I’m reserving the rest of the series as fun reads, and will read them as needed. From there, I’ll move on to the Aubrey Martin and the Sharpe series (thanks @Clavius and @KevinKrisher for the suggestions)

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Last week’s chapter saw The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe bring home the golden laurels for Hank Rhody,[1] who asks: What’s the best story an author promised but never told? What adventure hooks left dangling, previous exploits mentioned but never described, or far-off lands mentioned but never visited would you like to see in […]

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Chapter 52 saw Carry On, Jeeves carry on home with the golden laurels, hearty fruitcake, and well-deserved cup of tea for B. W. Wooster,[1] who asks: What’s the best children’s picture book? One that includes artwork and can be read in 15 minutes or less to sleepy-headed children.  Ideally this is a book that despite […]

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Found Books

 

You know the feeling. You’re visiting a family or staying at a hotel, and you spot books. They draw you, and you pull out the most appealingly packaged volumes, start thumbing through, and read random interesting passages with no thought of discipline. Sometimes, you actually commit yourself to one. You sit down with it and read long sections, so absorbed that you stay up way past your bedtime. Case studies and examples are irresistible. Or you borrow the book, take it home, and read it from cover to cover. Can your found books and how you read them tell a story about your life?

My story away from home started with . . . well, no, actually, it goes farther back than that.  After I discovered reading, taught by my mom in our village home in Northeast Thailand, I always picked up books at friends’ houses. What else are you going to do when there’s no TV? One of my earliest memories was of a family visit with German friends in the mountains. In the kids’ room, I saw the row of colorful picture books and hesitated, remembering that this family spoke German. But I took a look anyway, and although the letters looked English, I realized I couldn’t decipher the text. My mom caused some momentary confusion when she said, “Did you see the books?!” And when I picked one up hopefully with the same indecipherable result, she laughed and said they were in German.

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Last week’s chapter ended in a tie, with Have Space Suit – Will Travel just drifting past Animal Farm on the tie-breaker.[1] So, this week we ask: What is one of your favourite light-hearted stories, and why? (Please try to explain what you like about it and why other people might want to read it […]

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Charlotte and Frodo were neck and neck, but A Tale of Two Cities brought the golden laurels home for DMak in last week’s chapter,[1] winning her the chance to ask: Excluding religious texts, what is the one book that a young man (high school and college age) should read? * * * Preview Open

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Starship Troopers captured the flag and golden laurels for Hartmann von Aue in Chapter 47, and he asks: What is the best depiction of self-sacrifice you have read in a work of fiction? Note that this can include works of historical fiction based on real events.  * * * Preview Open

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At the back of a marvellous magical wardrobe, a new world awaits – or a new-old world – where they have golden laurels and hearty fruitcakes. Or at least that’s what the Deputy Librarian seemed to think DrewInWisconsin meant when he emerged, shaking off snow and saying something about sequels to The Chronicles of Narnia.[1] […]

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