Tag: blues

This week on “The Learning Curve,” Gerard and Cara talk with Professor Arnold Rampersad, the Sara Hart Kimball Professor Emeritus in Humanities at Stanford University and recipient of the National Humanities Medal for his books including The Life of Langston Hughes and Ralph Ellison: A Biography. They discuss what teachers and students today should know about Langston Hughes’s celebrated literary life and poetry, including his influence on African-American literati during the Harlem Renaissance, and how his works, such as “Harlem (A Dream Deferred)” and “Mississippi –1955,” impacted the Civil Rights Movement. They then turn to Ralph Ellison, whose 1952 novel, Invisible Man, is among the greatest works of 20th-century American fiction. Professor Rampersad shares the major formative experiences and intellectual influences on Ellison’s life and writing, including his Oklahoma upbringing, Tuskegee Institute education, and interest in literary figures such as Dostoevsky, Hardy, Melville, Twain, and Faulkner. He also offers insights on the connection between the writings of Hughes and Ellison, and blues and jazz music, with its complexity and exploration of suffering. Professor Rampersad concludes the interview with a reading from his biography of Ralph Ellison.

Stories of the Week: In an effort to stem COVID-related learning loss, more than 230 public schools in Hawaii will offer summer school on campus for free, using federal relief funds. In Baltimore, high school students started a mentorship program to help younger peers on topics such as financial assistance, standardized testing, and course selection.

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The age of the middle class is not the age of the blues. The middle-class character of a community precludes the kinds of experiences whence the blues emerges, as well as the craft required for singing it. If music is supposed to correspond to or to raise to imagination & judgment the deep longings of the […]

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This is a Hoagy Carmichael song from 1939. It’s the first time the singer addresses directly the cause of the suffering. Again, we see the way the lover acknowledges his enslavement to his absent beloved without losing his mind is humor. This time, it is clear to what extent the humor is a form of […]

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This is the first of three Rodgers & Hart numbers on In the wee small hours. It is the only song you could call funny–the title announces a love of paradox, to speak in the old manner, & that implies a sophistication not usually suspected in American songbook lyrics–a strategy. The first two songs on […]

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After the newly-commissioned In the wee small hours of the morning, Sinatra went with a classic. He had a strange gift for bringing back old songs on his adult album–for example, this song was written by Duke Ellington back in 1930 & it turned out to be popular enough a melody to earn a lyric. […]

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