Tag: Blue Wave

Rafael Mangual joins Seth Barron to discuss the disturbing leftward trend among urban prosecutors in major cities and the consequences of undoing the crime-fighting revolution of the 1990s.

In recent years, cities like Philadelphia and Chicago have elected district attorneys dedicated to the principles of social-justice and the goal of “dismantling mass incarceration.” The shift away from proactive law enforcement has opened a rift between police and local prosecutors and points to more trouble ahead for many cities.

Welcome lil’ chil’ren to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for November 7, 2018, the day after the day (election day, that is)! We are bringing you episode number One-Nine-Nine of this venerable podcast. Who are we, you ask? We are East Coast radio guy Todd Feinburg and West Coast AI guy Mike Stopa. We are here every week and we hope you are too!

This week it is wall-to-wall elections! The Blue Wave! Was it transcendental? Was it a mere ripple of its promised self? Was it mitigated or enhanced by Le Grande Orange? We will discuss.

City Journal’s Brian Anderson and Seth Barron discuss New York’s upcoming elections and the prospect of a state government run entirely by Democrats.

New York’s local politics have long been driven by a partisan split in the state legislature. With the help of moderate Democrats, Republicans have held a narrow majority in the state senate since 2010. This year, however, many of those moderates were beaten in the primaries by more progressive candidates. As a result, Democrats are poised to take over state government in Albany next year.

Arizona Rally: The MAGA Main Event

 

This report follows an earlier report on the “opening acts” at the 19 October 2018, Mesa, Arizona, MAGA rally. The event started after a significant number of people were in the hanger, but while people were still being admitted both into the hanger and then into the overflow viewing area. The organization and execution of the event reflected great professionalism and experience. This set the stage for a successful appearance by the President and Senate candidate Martha McSally, both of whose performances are worth noting. We do not have a Texas-size population, but Arizona punches way above its weight.

Staging: Yuge congratulations to the City of Mesa, the Donald J. Trump MAGA event coordinators, and especially the Mesa Police Department! This event was at least double the size of the 2017 Phoenix rally and had none of the leftist mob drama. To be fair, the choice of terrain favored law enforcement, and discouraged significant trouble, before or after the event. Instead of urban canyons, through which small groups could maneuver and strike, the venue was at the edge of a former Air Force airfield, with open desert on its border.

Arizona Rally: The Opening Act, Oh My!

 

The Arizona MAGA Rally was another great success, no thanks to the new Arizona Republican Party Chairman. The structure of these rallies is set and well known by now. President Trump is the headliner, and he will bring up a person who he wants to highlight during his speech. Before that, there are a series of opening acts, following the consistent opening ceremony, comprised of: the Pledge of Allegiance, public prayer invocation, and the National Anthem. Stunningly, the new guy in Arizona, Jonathan Lines, managed to mangle both the National Anthem and the opening acts.

Setting the Scene:

Jim  Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America look at generic congressional ballot polls showing the Democratic blue wave might not threaten Republicans as much as was previously thought. They also think Laura Ingraham took the wrong tone during an immigration rant on Wednesday night, and they suggest the immigration discussion focus on policies and beliefs rather than demographics. And they continue to knock Republicans and Democrats for prioritizing celebrities in politics above genuine discussion of ideas, with actor Richard Gere’s name being tossed into the ring for New York’s 18th Congressional District and lawyer Michael Avenatti heading to Iowa to explore a presidential bid.

Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.Will we see a big “blue wave” this November that puts Democrats back in control of the US House of Representatives or a more modest action the hurts Republicans but doesn’t end their majority status? David Brady, the Hoover Institution’s Davies Senior Fellow and a Stanford political scientist, assesses the current state of the electorate – and what the recent vote in California says about the odds of the House flipping for a third time in a little over a decade.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America shake their heads as Democrats win another high-profile special election.  By itself, it may not mean much, but Democrats have won a string of races where Republicans were expected to be competitive or heavily favored.  Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is openly concerned about a “Blue Wave” in 2018 and Jim and Greg discuss why he’s right to sound the alarm.  They also sigh as the Trump administration and China swap tariffs, leading to stock market drops and higher prices.  And they shake their heads as the media go wall-to-wall with coverage of the shootings at You Tube headquarters, only to drop the story when the shooter does not fit the media stereotype of a mass shooter.