Tag: Black Lives Matter

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Cara Candal and Gerard Robinson talk with Robert Woodson, Sr., founder and president of the Woodson Center that supports neighborhood-based initiatives to revitalize low-income communities, as well as author and editor of the May 2021 book, Red, White, and Black. Woodson shares his background in civil rights advocacy, serving low-income neighborhoods fighting crime, educational inequity, and racial discord, including his involvement with the Urban League in the 1970s during Boston’s busing crisis. He offers thoughts on race relations in America after the murder of George Floyd, the call for defunding the police, and the ongoing struggles to reform the country’s larger urban school districts.

They then turn to the 1776 Unites project, which he launched to counter the 1619 Project, to take a balanced approach to K-12 American history instruction. He describes the main arguments from his new book, and reactions since its publication, as well as the challenges of being a right-leaning public intellectual, and the importance of having open discussions about race and policy that are informed by differing points of view.

Ayaan talks with Megyn Kelly about sexual harassment in the workplace, critical race theory being taught in schools, and media biases.

Megyn Kelly is the founder of Devil May Care Media and currently hosts the podcast The Megyn Kelly Show.

How Close Are Conservatives to Civil Disobedience?

 

How close are we to experiencing real civil disobedience? Not from the left, since we’ve always had that. Violent protests, including placing bombs in the US Capitol, have long been a feature of the left and almost ubiquitous since the Vietnam War. We saw it last summer during the George Floyd-inspired riots – over 500 violent incidents in more than 200 cities across the United States. The days of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s exhortations to “non-violence” now look quaint. But this time, from conservatives? What might disobedience from conservative Americans look like?

This is not an academic question. It may be closer to reality than you realize. And it will look nothing like the violent Antifa and BLM protests that have maimed dozens of police officers and destroyed thousands of businesses and a few federal buildings.

The Best Articles I Read in 2020

 

Here at the end of 2020, I’m trying to close up a number of tabs I have open on my browser. Many of them are articles, and of that number I’m certain several were suggested or linked to by fellow Ricochet members, mentioned in podcasts, or discovered through searches prompted by Ricochet discussions. I was originally going to say “The 10 Best Articles…”, but the list is more than ten articles and I’m sure I’m forgetting some additional ones that I read months ago…it’s been a long year.

For this post I loosely define “the best” articles as those that challenged my thinking on an issue, were educational, were unexpected or deservedly scandalous, courageously broke with prevailing current narratives, or discussed an important topic otherwise ignored or forgotten. I’m not going to say which characteristic applies to which article as I’m trying to keep this post relatively brief, and each article could form the foundation of a post and become fertile ground for discussion. Some of the articles were written in years prior to 2020, but I just got around to reading them this year and they were either prophetic or remain pertinent to current events. Grouped with some of the articles I have read, I’m also listing what I’m going to read next in regard to that topic. These will have “to be read” in parentheses next to them.

Cydnee Black uploaded her first makeup tutorial to YouTube in 2013, at that time, she was one of the few African Americans doing makeup tutorials. She now has over 1 million subscribers and is considered an “influencer” even though she despises that term. She has since transitioned into researching moments in history that interest her and creating informational videos about topics such as the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearings, JFK’s affairs, and the life of Coco Chanel, while still doing makeup applications. She talks to Bridget being a black girl with blue eyes, how she was bullied for “speaking white,” and how she and her sister were the only black kids at their school. They cover why you should never idolize anyone on the internet, why women hate their bodies so much, keeping themselves small to make others feel more comfortable, BLM, cancel culture, psychics, colorism, and being your own brand.

Howard Husock talks with Shelby and Eli Steele about their new documentary, What Killed Michael Brown?, and Amazon’s refusal to make the film available on its Prime Video streaming platform.

The documentary is written and narrated by Shelby Steele, a scholar at the Hoover Institution, and directed by his filmmaker son, Eli Steele. It is available through their website, whatkilledmichaelbrown.com.

Member Post

 

Just over forty five years ago, on September 18th, 1975, many of the remaining members of the Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA), Bill Harris (a.k.a. Teko), Emily Harris (a.k.a. Yolanda), Steven Soliah, Wendy Yoshimura, and Patty Hearst (a.k.a. Tania), were arrested in San Francisco and Oakland, California. The kidnapping and radicalization of Patty Hearst by the […]

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Member Post

 

My problem with the Black Lives Matter (BLM) movement—other than that it has disgraced and discredited itself with arson, looting, assault, and murder—is that the literal interpretation is a truism that no one disagrees with. BLM uses that unanimity to demand allegiance to myriad other ideas that are, to be generous, debatable. When anyone disagrees […]

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Felecia Killings is the founder and visionary of the Conscious Conservative Movement which wants to empower people who are looking to expand the authentic conservative space, and to go back to the principles of conservatism and spiritual understanding. She and Bridget delve into the complex topic of Black Conservatism, what it looks like today, why Felecia was primarily getting attacked by black conservative influencers, the fact that the black community is not a monolith, and that a lot of people in that community are politically homeless at the moment. They discuss the history of the Republican Party and black voters, where Felecia thinks opportunities are being missed to reach black communities, why fellowship, knowing history, and asking questions that leave aside the talking points is a better way to do things than the current strategies, and why people on the fringes of both parties are the ones that get the attention and the platforms. Learn more about the movement and Felecia’s body of work at feleciakillings.org.

All Lives Matter

 

People who think that phrase is racist are confused and are falling for the same fictions that are tearing the country apart.

America is not a racist country any more than America is an arsonist country, or a child-abuser country, or a wife-beater country, or a serial-killer country. America isn’t defined by any of those things, though all of those things are present, to a small degree, in America.

The Anti-American Violence Plaguing the US and How to Solve It

 

The United States of America is increasingly under assault from an anti-American mob that has gained mainstream prominence across the country. This mob has ravaged major US cities for weeks on end, torn down historical monuments, and murdered innocent citizens.

At a recent Oakland “Black Lives Matter” event, “protestors” chanted “death to America” — an anti-American death threat used by Iranian government officials. These same “protestors” hurled projectiles at police officers, set trucks on fire, and vandalized buildings.

Member Post

 

  I received a video recording of a mama and three bears at a neighbor’s, located across the street from a beach house that I manage. The mama bear was huge, straddling the back fence, with her snout facing a delicious bird feeder. The family who spotted her grabbed the camera. The audio says “there’s […]

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Ready for the Second Wave of Covid? The one that may never come?

After our weekly update from the Lockdown-Sceptic-in-Chief, James and Toby ridicule the idea that Extinction Rebellion and Black Lives Matter protestors are street-fighting, working class rebels. In fact, they’re white, privileged, privately-educated members of the ruling class, which is why the police stand idly by and watch them smash windows and block roads or fall to their knees in obeisance. The real rebels are the anti-lockdown protestors, which is why they’re being arrested and fined £10,000.

My Testimony, 9/11 and Now

 

On a beautiful fall morning barely two weeks after my 21st birthday, a commercial airliner was flown into one of my favorite buildings in the world. Seventeen minutes later, a second plane was flown into another of my favorite buildings and the country knew we were under attack.

In the early morning hours of my 40th birthday, the shooting started in what may become America’s second civil war.

In this episode, Dave Carter turns the tables on Whiskey Politics’ proprietor and frequent Real Side Radio host Dave Sussman by interviewing the guy who is usually asking questions of others. Along the way we learn that the current mass exit of people from the progressive utopia of California means that, A) U-Haul trucks are impossible to reserve, and B) too many of California’s evacuees bring their political beliefs with them and end up voting for the same policies that wrecked the place they left. The two Daves also discuss voter trends in the African American community and the prospects for the Biden Campaign, before moving on to speculate on the best way to deal with rioters and protestors who block public roads.

Dave also welcomes Ricochet Charter Member Brian Watt to discuss his recent articles addressing the similarities of the 2020 presidential election with the elections of 1968 and 1972, before explaining how the election could be derailed or even hijacked by mail-in ballot mischief.  We believe you’ll find the discussion, and the entire podcast for that matter, fascinating and entertaining.

Back to the regularly scheduled broadcast!

On this show, Seth, Park, Grant, and Jay discuss Joe Biden’s speech addressing protest violence, how the media narrative shifted to cover the protests, and whether or not Biden’s speech is more effective for quelling violence or for his campaign.

Join Jim and Greg as they’re glad to see Kellyanne and George Conway end their ugly public debates, leave their jobs, and focus on their family. They also unload on Virginia’s public health director for announcing the COVID vaccine will mandatory for residents there. And they hammer Kamala Harris for her political tap dance in trying to explain why she called for more cops a decade ago but now promises to carry the banner for Black Lives Matter.