Tag: Bipartisanship

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The news and social media is full of breaking stories. Something that happened last week is old news. As all of us, whether we support the president or not, know, the media loathes and despises him and freak out in predictable lemming fashion when they find something to scream about. I recall the press conference the […]

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(NOTE: The Josiah Bartlett Center for Public Policy, New Hampshire’s original free-market think tank, publishes a weekly email newsletter. This week’s newsletter is a little rumination on partisanship. It’s posted below, in full, for your consideration. If you enjoyed this essay, you can sign up for the free Friday newsletter here.)   Preview Open

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There is a lot of moaning that the Republicans have confirmed Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch by suspending the filibuster of Supreme Court nominees. Time (a red-bordered pamphlet found in doctor’s offices) laments that this was “the last vestige of bipartisanship on presidential nominees in an increasingly polarized Senate.” (Something they did not lament when […]

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I’m accustomed to being isolated politically. When I lived in San Francisco, for example, I was not only president of the Bay Area Republicans Club but I was also the member. Other places I’ve lived – Wheaton, Illinois, Boulder and Denver, Colorado, Herne, Germany and Long Beach, California have only reinforced to me the truth […]

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Moderation Isn’t Compromise

 

Responding to a Vox article by Ezra Klein, Mark Steyn explains how the common understanding of “moderate” voters is mistaken:

Because the first position is “left” and the second position is “right,” the pollsters split the difference and label such a person a “moderate.” But he isn’t actually a moderate, so much as bipartisanly extreme. In practice, most “moderates” boil down to that: They hold some leftie and some rightie positions. The most familiar type of “moderate” in American politics are the so-called “fiscally conservative, socially liberal” red governors of blue states. […] As Trump’s detractors see it, he’s just a reality-show buffoon with a portfolio of incoherent attitudes that display no coherent worldview. But very few people go around with a philosophically consistent attitude to life: Your approach to, say, health insurance is determined less by abstract principles than by whether you can afford it. Likewise, your attitude to the DREAMers may owe more to whether your local school district is collapsing under the weight of all this heartwarming diversity.