Tag: Bill de Blasio

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Must Be The Guns

 

shutterstock_129482747Early Monday morning, Carey Gabay, an aide to New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, was shot in the head, apparently by a stray bullet; he is not expected to survive. As member kelsurprise notes on the Member Feed, both Cuomo and New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio are already calling for additional gun control measures, despite New York already having some of the least gun-friendly laws in the country:

Seeing as Cuomo’s previous foray into more stringent gun laws bordered on delusional, I’m curious to know what additional measures he thinks will manage to address the criminal element responsible for the majority of gun violence here, while still “protecting the Second Amendment and legitimate gun owners.”

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Left vs. the Sharing Economy: Where Are the Atari Democrats of Today?

 

Atari-2600-Wikimedia-commons-500x293Vox’s Timothy Lee looks at how Republicans and Democrats view the emerging sharing economy. Republicans — at least nationally — seem almost uniformly positive. They see Uber, for instance, as a feisty, innovative startup vs. regulators and the cronyist taxicab cartel. But Democrats are sort of split. Lee:

Some liberals dislike Uber on ideological grounds, but others — especially in the media, politics, and technology centers of New York, Washington, and San Francisco — are regular Uber customers. On one side of this debate are old-school liberals with strong ties to the labor movement and urban political machines. For them, Uber is a conventional story about worker and consumer rights. Labor unions believe Uber is flouting the law by classifying workers as independent contractors rather than employees. And they would love to unionize Uber’s fast-growing workforce.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. New York’s Loser Mayor

 

Mayor-Elect De Blasio Makes AnnouncementBill de Blasio has a big mouth, which is good, because he eats a lot of words.

For all his bluster, the 6’5” mayor of New York City loses a lot of political battles. And he loses them in public.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Libertarian Podcast, with Richard Epstein: Uber and Innovation

 

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio — brace yourself for this one — is trying to make it harder for Uber to do business in the Big Apple. This comes on the heels, of course, of California trying to upend the company’s classification of its drivers as independent contractors and protests from French cabbies who are upset about the competition.

Can innovative companies like Uber overcome the political power of the incumbent companies they’re disrupting? Is it inevitable that even the most dynamic startups will have to eventually assimilate to the culture of lobbyists and rent-seeking? Those are some of the topics I take up with Professor Epstein in this week’s installment of The Libertarian. Listen in below or subscribe to the show via iTunes or your favorite podcast app.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. A Revolution of Sorts in the State of New York

 

Every once in a while, a set of political arrangements that seemed set in stone simply collapses. The wall dividing Berlin suddenly came down. The Soviet Union fell apart. Syria succumbed to civil war. And today Sheldon Silver, who has been Speaker of the Assembly in New York for twenty years, was arrested on corruption charges.

For as along as I can remember, the state of New York has been run by a condominium. The assembly belonged to the Democrats, and the only assemblyman who mattered was the Speaker. Everyone else was a time-server. He made all of the decisions. The senate belonged to the Republicans, and the only figure who mattered was the Majority Leader. He made all of the decisions.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. I’m From the Government, and I’m Here to Help — Suzanne Temple

 

I was recently struck by all those photos of hundreds (if not thousands) of kids in New York wearing bright yellow T-shirts, holding signs that read “save our schools.” As you probably know, Mayor Bill de Blasio has been attempting to render three successful charter schools homeless. Why? It’s for the kids, of course. As his office tweeted out, they want to make “sure that all our kids get a great education.” I wonder what those kids in their yellow T-shirts are learning from all this. I wonder if it’s anything like what I learned as a kid.
I was eight years old the first summer that my family went to pick fruit in Washington state. It was the ’80s. It could’ve been around the time when President Reagan was quipping about the nine most terrifying words in the English language: “I’m from the government, and I’m here to help.” I’d never heard those words, but in the coming years I would learn what he meant.
I suppose sociologists would’ve called us migrant farm laborers, but to us and everyone in the Tri-cities and Yakima valley we were simply cherry pickers. Our first summer, a family we knew helped us find work at the orchards they’d picked in years past. Their youngest daughter was my age and we became fast friends. Being little, I don’t remember much about that first summer. But I do remember I had my sights set on a purple bicycle with pink tassels on the handlebars that I’d seen at Toys “R” Us. I needed to pick $80 worth of cherries to buy it. And I did. Best bike I’ve ever owned.
We went back several summers thereafter. My parents required that my brothers and I pay for our own clothes and school supplies for the year, but all money we earned beyond that was ours. Though I liked making money, it was the after-work hours I enjoyed the most. At one orchard, my brothers and I would spend our late afternoons playing wiffle ball with a family from Oklahoma whose kids had such thick southern accents that I doubted they were speaking English at all. I recall another family we hung out with in several orchards. They had it tough. The mom was from Mexico and didn’t speak a word of English. Her husband had run off and left her with their two sons, who were close to my age. Along with her uncle, she and her sons picked cherries like their lives depended on it. In a way, I guess they did.
And then the government came to help.
I was probably around 14 years old when we were picking in an orchard where the foreman told us to leave. State law had changed, and my brothers and I were now not old enough to work. I suppose lawmakers didn’t like the idea of “child labor”—and wasn’t it awful that we were around tractors, ladders, and other things that grade-school kids think are cool? Fortunately, we had gotten to know a few growers who were willing to make an exception for us. But we agreed to always keep an eye out for anyone who came strolling into the orchard looking like they might be from some government agency.
In the summers that followed, we were the only family. The crews became uniformly single men or men away from their families. I wondered whatever happened to the family from Oklahoma, the Mexican mom with her sons, and the family who showed us the ropes that first year. I remember thinking that it was all so stupid. Families needed to earn a living. Why wouldn’t the government let them? Did politicians really have nothing better to do than try to save kids from earning money for pink-tasseled bicycles?
Apparently, not much has changed. Bureaucrats are now trying to save children from attending the charter schools they love. Politicians are here to help you, kids. They want to make sure you get a good education by closing down the schools where you’re getting a good education. Thanks for the help, government.

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