Tag: Big Tech

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QotD: From Sharyl Attkisson on Censorship

 

Saw this and thought of many of us:

When you see news outlets, “fact checkers,” Internet companies, and others working hard to keep you from seeing or believing something; or controversializing a news outlet, reporter, or other person; use that as a cue to understand that the item/fact/study at issue may actually be true and worthy of further inquiry on your part. The attention giving to censor or controversialize typically signals that powerful interests are trying to hide something or attempting to further a narrative that may be false.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome the CDC loosening rules on who can get the coronavirus vaccines. They also wade into the big tech crackdown on President Trump, Parler, and others, and discuss what free speech is and is not. And they roll their eyes as the media are now on day three of Kamala Harris being upset with the photo used of her on the cover of Vogue.

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@drbastiat has written a characteristically interesting post entitled Ricochet Should Join the Conversation in which he laments the limited reach of conservative content in the internet at-large. Herewith I offer some adjacent thoughts regarding the need for an awakening of sorts – an epiphany whereby all users, especially conservatives, come to grips with the unhappy reality […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

I’d be interested to hear anyone’s thoughts about this. By virtue of their market dominance and the competitive advantages of large networks, the tech giants are able to manage the flow of news and information, censoring, throttling, and editorializing as they wish. They can do this transparently or invisibly, using increasingly sophisticated algorithms coupled with […]

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Ep. 263 – Matthew Tyrmand, Investigative Reporter, and the source on Hunter Biden’s Laptop Prove MASSIVE CORRUPTION with 26,000 emails from Bevan Cooney, Devon Archer, the Cover-Up by BigTech, Media and Censorship. And then Dave’s Election Predictions, Borat 2 review and what’s at stake on Nov. 3rd.

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The theory behind the liberalization of trade rules with China starting during the George W. Bush administration was that by “liberalizing” trade with China and presumably China’s economy the Chinese would liberalize their society and import democratic principles. It has proven to be 100% wrong. China, i.e. the Chinese Communist Party, took our money, stole […]

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This week on the UK’s Fastest Growing Podcast® James and Toby ruminate about the relationship between the English and the Scots and lament what the SNP has done to it – and that’s just the beginning of a very full show.

What does Donald Trump’s Covid diagnosis mean to the US election and what’s more of a threat – disease or Big Tech? (#DELETED: Big Tech’s Battle to Erase the Trump Movement and Steal the Election by Allum Bokhari)

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On Monday night, my iPhone turned off and wouldn’t turn back on. That’s just a minor personal inconvenience with a straightforward, if not pricy, solution—right? So the next morning, I scheduled an appointment at a repair shop for that afternoon and tried to log in for work. And that’s where the “minor personal inconvenience” snowballed. […]

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Anders Hagstrom returns to the show to discuss the Big Tech menace (?), the Tik Tok menace (!), and the pleasures of video games (?!?).

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As if the country did not have enough problems with Big Tech including Facebook, Twitter, and the like. Along comes Churchix. Churchix provides facial recognition software for churches. Now your local cult will know who attends and who does not attend those church services to bring their all-important money to the collection plate. Don’t believe […]

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Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) and host of the The Daily Wire’s podcast “The Michael Knowles Show” Michael Knowles joined Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss everything from censorship by big tech to Tik Tok and the Chinese Communist Party. Sen. Cruz and Knowles co-host the political podcast “Verdict With Ted Cruz” in which Cruz gives his take on the most important national news.

The senator argued that although media bias has been around forever, it’s immensely dangerous that a handful of monopolies now control every means of discourse. Similarly to China, the left, who controls all the major institutions in America, doesn’t want people to thoughtfully communicate their ideas because they don’t work. They must suppress free speech and silence the truth, Sen. Cruz said, because truth prevails if the discourse allows for it.

In the latest episode, the Young Americans get super nerdy, with the help of real-life tech policy researcher Caleb Watney of the R Street Institute. He and Jack discuss the virtues of free markets vs. Millennial skepticism thereof, question the emerging conventional wisdom on tech addiction and Silicon Valley, rebut the Unabomber (!), and go full nerd with semi-related digressions about Blade RunnerThe Matrix, and, of course, Dune.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. US Economy Might Be Growing Faster Than We Think

 

The economics team at Goldman Sachs has made another run at trying to determine whether official statistics are undermeasuring America’s rapidly evolving digital economy. The bank now believes even more strongly that “technological change is not fully reflected in the real output statistics.”

From a bottom-up perspective, there’s all that missing growth from free digital goods. From a top-down perspective, Goldman economists note that the “growth of domestically generated profits and incomes (GDI) is outpacing that of GDP, a departure from earlier decades” and that “US profits generated in tax havens totaled over $300bn in 2018, some of which represents unmeasured domestic production.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Facebook Censors Conservative Author Brad Thor

 

Someone at Facebook decided that paying to promote a post on your favorite internet destination is verboten. Carol Roth, host of The Roth Effect here at the Ricochet Audio Network, wanted to promote her latest episode, an interview with best-seller author Brad Thor, but was told she needed to get “authorized” to run ads about “social issues, elections or politics.” So what triggered the rejection? Was it her name, the name of her guest, Brad Thor, or was it the destination?

Here’s the ad she tried to buy:

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Don’t Ruin the Internet Over Flukey ‘Bias’ Incidents Like the One on Pinterest

 

What passes for “evidence” of Big Tech bias against the right tends to be of the anecdotal variety. A piece of content gets blocked or hidden. An account gets suspended or banned. And then conservative media goes crazy, charging that Silicon Valley is suppressing conservative thought and thinkers.

The latest controversy involves a Pinterest employee sending a series of internal documents to the right-wing political website Project Veritas. The documents supposedly prove flagrant discrimination against pro-life groups and religious conservatives. This whistleblower claims the documents show that Liveaction.org — a pro-life informational website with more than 3 million followers on social media — was unfairly added to a domain blacklist reserved for porn domains, which are prevented from being pinned by Pinterest.

As is typical of these things, the more you look at them, the less substance that appears. Pinterest responded that Live Action site had been “actioned,” Fortune magazine reports, “for “misinformation related to conspiracies and anti-vaccination advice,” and not porn. Indeed, Pinterest was the first platform to clamp down on anti-vaccination content under health and public safety considerations. After the Project Veritas report came out, Pinterest responded by removing Liveaction.org from its porn domain list and said the list name was a legacy from an anti-porn effort years ago. Indeed, there are other URLs on the list, which have nothing to do with porn, such as ZeroHedge.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Washington’s War on Big Tech: Must There Be a Google?

 

If Washington’s War on Google has begun, when will it end? The Justice Department is apparently gearing up an investigation of the internet giant. And for what reason exactly? That’s unclear. But one 2012 Federal Trade Commission analysis might give us a hint. It described Google as “engaging in tactics that resulted in harm to many vertical competitors, and likely helped to entrench Google’s monopoly power over search and search advertising.”

Overseas, the European Commission has thrice fined Google for business practices deemed uncompetitive. The most recent came last March when regulators hit the company with a nearly $2 billion fine for past “abusive practices.” The EC said Google “abused its market dominance by imposing a number of restrictive clauses in contracts with third-party websites which prevented Google’s rivals from placing their search adverts on these websites.”

But hefty fines and, say, better ad placement for Yelp and TripAdvisor, may hardly be punitive or radical enough given the dramatic complaints of some activists and policymakers. Alphabet-Google, tweeted Sen. Elizabeth Warren, “has too much power, and they’re using that power to hurt small businesses, stifle innovation, and tilt the playing field against everyone else.” (At minimum, she would “unwind” past Google acquisitions of DoubleClick, Nest, and Waze. Others would split off YouTube. On the right, nationalist populist leader Steve Bannon sees nationalization, at least partial, as a possible answer. Other activists would go further.)

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The era of free lunches is over, at least in the tech industry. For decades Big Tech has relied on exponential growth in computing power to compensate for deficiencies in everything from management practices to programmer training. But no longer. The end of Moore’s law (the observation that transistor density tended to double every two […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Why America’s Social Media Firms Aren’t ‘Parasites’

 

It’s hard to be a big tech company these days without somebody rooting for your demise. But some cases are a bit more understandable than others. Like this one: “Bannon says killing Huawei more important than trade deal with China.” I mean, I get it. Former Trump White House adviser and nationalist Steve Bannon wants America to launch and win a Tech Cold War against China. Taking an ax to what might be its most important tech company, a key player in the global 5G rollout, might be a big step forward in such a plan.

But it’s not Americans wanting to shut down just Chinese tech companies. Sometimes it’s Americans going after American firms. “Maybe we’d be better off if Facebook disappeared,” writes Sen. Josh Hawley, a Missouri Republican, in an op-ed for USA Today. And his problem isn’t just with the social media giant run by Mark Zuckerberg. According to Hawley, Twitter and Instagram, though oddly not YouTube, are also “best understood as a parasite on productive investment, on meaningful relationships, on a healthy society,” He claims they’ve created an “addiction economy” based on extracting and selling data gleaned from uninformed users. The first sentence of the piece: “Social media consumers are getting wise to the joke that when the product is free, they’re the ones being sold.”

To be sure, Hawley is not using “disappear” in what’s been called the “post-Argentina transitive use of an intransitive verb,” as in “disappearing” a political opponent. Although, some of the more intensive anti-tech critics might want to disappear these companies. But even calls for heavy regulation or anti-trust action — banning business models or breaking up big firms — requires serious argument and evidence, as well as proof of harm from elected officials. This also means grappling with research contrary to your thesis and understanding trade-offs. Does Facebook have value? As I wrote recently:

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Should We Tax Facebook and Google So They Change Their Business Models?

 

Paul Romer.
Is Big Tech today as dangerous as Big Money a decade ago? Economist and Nobel laureate Paul Romer seems to think there are disturbing similarities. In a New York Times op-ed, Romer advocates taxing revenue from the sales of targeted digital ads to check the size and power of “dominate digital platforms,” specifically Facebook and Google. “Our digital platforms may not be too big to fail,” he writes. “But they are too big to trust.” Romer’s policy goal is to nudge these companies away from the original sin of advertising-driven business models, and Romer sees a Pigovian tax as a more efficient way to reduce their size and influence than antitrust or regulation. He doesn’t like targeted ads, nor the financial power they generate.

Romer’s approach toward Big Tech might sound familiar to anyone who followed the post-Financial Crisis debate about Wall Street and “too big to fail.” Among the policy options for taming the megabanks and de-risking their business models were regulation, antitrust, or higher capital requirements. That last one, advocates argued, was the most efficient and market-friendly way of making failure less likely, potentially serving as a de facto tax on bigness, or even spurring a self-initiated breakup.

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One of the biggest debates ongoing within the right involves the regulation of Big Tech companies, namely Twitter, FaceBook, and Google. Briefly, the populists are on one side. They believe that American tech companies should follow free speech principles despite being private companies. Opposing them are the free marketeers, who also disagree with what these […]

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