Tag: Ben Domenech

Journalist and former academic Dr. Deborah Soh joined host Ben Domenech to discuss how she takes a scientific and research-based approach to debunking the most common misconceptions about gender identity. Soh compiled her research in her new book, “The End of Gender: Debunking the Myths about Sex and Identity in Our Society.”

Soh said she’s grateful to no longer be in the academic world, where everyone is required to accept so many scientific mistruths as facts. As a liberal herself, Soh said the evolution of gender identity has been used by the radical left to further a narrative that’s harmful to children and not based in science.

Rep. Ken Buck (R-Colo.) joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the danger of big tech censorship for the American public. Rep. Buck’s new book, “Capitol Freedom: Restoring American Greatness,” is out now.

Many Republicans argue all private companies ought to remain unfettered by government intervention, but Buck argues that big tech companies such as Google don’t use the extreme level of power they wield over free speech fairly. He debunked the idea that there’s no relationship between privacy and size, saying that if these companies didn’t have a monopoly on free speech, they couldn’t get away with their actions.

Civil rights activist Bob Woodson joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the racism behind the left’s recent “anti-racist” activism. Woodson is the Founder and President of the Woodson Center, where you can learn more about his work on the 1779 Project.

Woodson said the message of the New York Times’ 1619 project takes advantage of specifically low-income black communities and falsely attributes their problems, namely the violence and brokenness of cities, as being external. The ideas lead essayist Hannah Nikole-Jones and her colleagues at the New York Times presented are “ahistorical,” he said.

Scott Atlas joined Ben Domenech to discuss the data surrounding schools reopening and the dangers of not following the science. Atlas is a fellow in scientific philosophy and public policy at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, a member of Hoover’s Working Group on Health Care Policy, and the former head of neuroradiology at Stanford Medical School.

Atlas laid out multiple points of scientific evidence indicating the necessity of reopening schools. This included the documented facts that children are young people are at low risk of developing COVID-19 themselves and they’re at low risk of spreading it to others. Furthermore, he said, school closures are extremely harmful to children’s health in different ways, especially in that distance learning has proven to be a failure.

Avik Roy joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the debate over how and when to reopen schools amid government lockdowns. Roy serves as the president of the  Foundation for Research on Equal Opportunity and the opinion editor at Forbes.

While following realistic protocol to ensure students’ safety, Roy asserts that schools must open this fall for children to have the greatest chance for success. It would be detrimental for students to not reap the mental, emotional, and physical benefits that schooling provides, he said. It also produces a large disparity between lower class and upper class children.

Author and Uyghur human rights activist Jewher Illham joined host Ben Domenech to discuss her personal experience fighting to expose the Chinese government’s treatment of Uyghur people. Illham is creating a documentary to raise awareness of the Uyghur‘s condition by amplifying survivors’ voices.

Illham, whose father was imprisoned seven years ago following his attempt to create an unbiased social media platform, argues that very few people both inside and outside of China are aware of the human rights offenses taking place. Uyghur people are faced into different levels of camps, including some that are solely used for torture.

Karol Markowicz joined Ben Domenech to discuss her view of America, including her thoughts on patriotism and her experience as a New Yorker, after having immigrated to the US from the USSR. Markowicz is a columnist at the New York Post and a contributer at The Spectator and the Washington Examiner. 

Markowicz argued Americans should prioritize their country and its needs above political victories. True patriots will want the best outcome for the whole of the nation despite any favor it may bring to their opposing political party. In many countries, she said, leaders have ultimate authority. In the United States, however, the president only has so much power and the power of individuals shouldn’t be underestimated.

Author David Paul Kuhn joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the makeup of the Democratic coalition of the ’70s and how it compares to the Democratic party of today. Kuhn wrote about the subject in his most recent book “The Hardhat Riot: Nixon, New York City, and the Dawn of the White Working-Class Revolution.”

Democrats don’t have to win a majority of the white working class, but they have to win enough of them, Kuhn asserted. Joe Biden is potentially in a position to do so in November. Once Democrats lose the anti-Trump coalition, which is much larger than the typical Democrat coalition, they will have a harder time winning a majority of seats in both houses of Congress. Kuhn said the Democratic party ought to focus on gaining more white middle class votes.

Economist Donald J. Boudreaux joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the long-lasting economic impact of the government shutdown. Boudreaux is a Professor of Economics at George Washington University, and serves as a Senior Fellow at the Mercatus Center and The Fund for American Studies.

Boudreaux wrote an article earlier this week titled “Who is Making Decisions About Our Lives?” in which he outlined the limited knowledge American leaders have. The American people also don’t understand, he argued, the government’s decision to have the Federal Reserve print money doesn’t create actual wealth in the form of any goods and services.

Jeffrey Singer joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the ways in which to treat COVID-19 based on his own experience as a general surgeon and Senior Fellow at Cato Institute. Singer discusses how hospitals, schools, and American leaders are calculating risk in their response to the Wuhan virus.

Singer’s hospital has delayed all elective procedures due to COVID-19, which includes any surgery for which the patient can choose the date. Singer argued that the system of power, in which the governor can dictate when the economy can reopen, has created imbalanced incentives. The person in charge will always be more cautious than they need to be to avoid criticism later on, which Singer said can hurt people.

Bestselling author, journalist, and environmental activist Michael Shellenberger joined host Ben Domenech to discuss climate alarmism and how the left wing media and activists have distorted the urgency of climate change. Shellenberger just published his most recent book, “Apocalypse Never: Why Environmental Alarmism Hurts Us All,” this month.

Shellenberger condemned the left’s journalists, climate activists, and malthusian scientists for promoting climate alarmism. The radical left has taken an immoral position by denying vast, inexpensive energy sources to all people, he said, which they consider to be the moral center of apocalyptic environmentalism.

Ilya Shapiro joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the meaning and impact of recent Supreme Court decisions. Shapiro serves as the Director of the Robert A. Levy Center for Constitutional Studies at the Cato Institute, and he recently wrote a new book, “Supreme Disorder: Judicial Nominations and the Politics of America’s Highest Court.

Shapiro observed that Chief Justice John Roberts is trying to push back against the idea that all Supreme Court justices must vote along their own party lines. Roberts thinks that by acting strategically, he is legitimizing the court in many people’s eyes. Shapiro argued, however, this tactic has garnered little respect for Roberts.

Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the recent demands for the destruction of Mount Rushmore National Memorial and his goals for ensuring all Americans can enjoy it and all other federal land.

Bernhardt said that the ability to visit national monuments is irreplaceable, and he believes that most Americans agree that they have beauty and purpose. Therefore, he said, he is always working to ensure that monuments are protected and accessible to everyone.

Eric Kaufmann joined host Ben Domenech to discuss his work within fields of research related to populism across the world and specifically in the United States. Kaufmann is a professor of politics at Birkbeck College at the University of London and is the author of “Whiteshift: Populism, Immigration, and the Future of White Majorities.”

Kaufmann argues that the new antiracism movement worldwide, but which is specifically dominant in American culture, is a form of secular religion. He refers to the modern American sentiment as the “third great awokening,” following the former waves in the late 60s and the 90s. It stems from the idea that tradition, both religious and national, ought to be eliminated to make room for the new religion of antiracism. It resembles many historical international movements, Kaufmann said.

Parler CEO John Matze joined host Ben Domenech to discuss the features of the social media app designed to promote free speech and allow for unbiased, uncensored discourse among users.

Matze said he created the app after seeing the biased algorithms by other platforms such as Instagram and Twitter, which failed to provide people honest content. Parler, he said, serves as a town square where everyone can share their ideas without fear of being removed for disagreeable content.

Fox News Senior Political Analyst Brit Hume joined host Ben Domenech to discuss race relations in America and how the issue has been politically manipulated by the left.

Hume argued that, since the nation reached an overwhelming consensus against racism, marked by the passage of the Civil Right Act, movements such as Black Lives Matter are capitalizing on that sentiment to usher in a new era with a different agenda. A movement that was once about tearing down barriers has switched to focus on tearing down statues.

Comedian Ryan Long joined host Ben Domenech to discuss cancel culture within the comedy industry and Long’s perspective on the recent protests. Long’s work can be found in his podcast “The Boyscast with Ryan Long” or on his YouTube channel.

Long argued the hypocrisy of woke white women demanding change for women and transgenders has moved the political conversation far away from the original discussion of police brutality and racial equality. The left, more generally, has taken an issue that began with a specific need for change and escalated it to involve many unrelated, larger issues.

The Federalist’s New York Correspondent David Marcus joined host Ben Domenech to discuss Marcus’ plans to protest the Museum of Natural History for its decision to remove its statue of Theodore Roosevelt from its steps.

The statue of Roosevelt on a horse next to an African man and a Native American man, Marcus said, represents Roosevelt’s progressive attitude. It shows the late president looking froward to an America in which everybody is treated equal. Modern progressives have gone too far in erasing history through its dangerous removal of statues.

Federal Communications Commission Commissioner Brendan Carr joined host Ben Domenech to discuss Google’s recent attempt to censor The Federalist and potential reform to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, under which big tech companies operate.

Carr favors Section 230 Reform after seeing the lack of accountability regarding recent events. Google’s actions, he argued, go beyond their right to free speech and demand public accountability to their public representation. While some think that big tech companies have a right to do what they want as a private company, Carr explains that Section 230 actually gives them advantages over other types of companies.

Lionel Shriver joins host Ben Domenech to discuss the popularity of fitness and how it cultivates an image-obsessed culture, and the left’s recent attempts to silence those who disagree with their ideas. Shriver is an author and journalist, and her most recent book is “The Motion of the Body Through Space.”

Shriver uses her new novel to explore the emerging religious aspect to fitness, and how one’s physique is now the ultimate measure of their success and ability. This newfound focus on health and fitness has become a competitive battle that no one can win since there is no end goal. Shiver compared this idea to the recent protests for racial equality, as neither cause has a desired achievement that would complete their efforts.