Tag: baseball

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Everything I know about baseball I learned from Vin Scully. In 1981 I kept hearing about this Fernando guy, tuned in to a game and I was hooked. Living in SoCal I spent a lot of time driving and I spent hours listening to Vin call the Dodger games. I fell in love with the […]

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I have come to the conclusion that the maximum age for coaching Little League Baseball is 55. I can say that with great certainty because I am 56. For the past 12 years, through three boys, I have always been an assistant coach. This year, with just two days before tryouts, the league asked me […]

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4/5 of the way there. Thanks to all of you who have contributed so generously to our fund to get Titus here this summer. Here’s the link to the site. Once we get to $5,000 we will purchase a flight ticket for Titus that has an open return date. He will choose a start date […]

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So he’s off to Cooperstown. I think, this is the fourth year he’s been on the ballot? I’m not sure I have anything to say about the reason it’s taken so long or about the ugly years of steroids scandals & suspicions. Instead, can I invite you to a baseball discussion? Anyone want to talk about […]

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The Boys of the November Late, Late Show

 

shutterstock_93556003In case you missed it, the Kansas City Royals are the Champions of Baseball. It was easy to miss because the Series ended at 12:37 ET this morning, when most fans — especially the kids — were all asleep in their beds. Fox executives will be crowing in public because the presence of a New York team boosted ratings, but privately have to be wondering why they and TBS are shelling out $1.55 billion for a sport that barely gets the ratings of NCIS.

Series ratings have been in a decline for decades and so is youth participation in the sport as a whole. Baseball knows that there’s a correlation between being an adult fan and having played the game as a child, but seems to dismiss any notion that playing the sport’s premier event in the dead of night has an adverse effect on attracting interest in young people.

If you were 12 years old when baseball last played a World Series day game then you just celebrated your 40th birthday this year. And even then the game was played indoors at the Metrodome in Minneapolis. The sun has not shone on a World Series game since 1984.

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There may be a team that goes by that name but not all baseball players are angels. From the Black Sox to Charlie Hustle the game has had its less than reputable characters and taken more than one black eye. Today on Colin Cowherd’s talker (Fox Sports Radio/FS1) former major leaguer Lenny “Nails” Dykstra claimed […]

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Behind the Mask of the Laughing Buddha

 

Cool_buddhaI have no talent. Neither do you. No one does. Or at least so few of us as makes no difference. Down in the scorched dust of a Dominican sandlot somewhere someone does. Some farm boy somewhere, some Greek god of hayseeds, he does. But those aren’t mortal men. Those bastard sons of Zeus were born to greatness. We, the vast and faceless throngs, meek and ordinary, whose mothers lacked the good fortune to lie with gods or the foresight to dip us like Achilles in the River Styx, were at best born to watch.

The difference between we, the cursed, and they, the blessed, is not that the immortals dared to dream and we did not. Life just isn’t that fair. We all dreamt together, but cruel fate dictated that for we, the humble, there would come a day on which the dream would die, on which we would discover an awful truth about ourselves that we would have to learn to live with, a stain that we would carry with us throughout what remained of our now emptier lives. For some, the day comes mercifully early; for others, it comes late and hard. But however it comes, whenever it comes, it comes. No mere man escapes that day. No man escapes the day it finally dawns on him after years of passionate self-deception that he truly, truly, deep down, at the very core of his being, at the fundament of his essential self … just sucks out loud at baseball.

The reaper came for my baseball career when I was 14. At 11, I was an all-star. There is a trophy in a box somewhere in the attic of the house where I grew up that establishes beyond all doubt that I was great once. Oh, yes, my friends; I was great once. Your faithful correspondent was a mighty slugger, a hitter of prodigious home runs. Those were days of wine, women, and song. Of course, I was 11: my parents wouldn’t let me have the wine and I wasn’t all that interested in the women yet. But, damn it all, if those weren’t days of song.

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It’s official: I’ve turned into a crotchety curmudgeon. With no shortage of justification for geo-political and economic outrage, sometimes it’s the most inane things that gets to me. By 2015 it was hoped  the infuriating trend of seeing princesses and pajamaboys incessant self absorption would have vanished into the ether along with tattoo sleeves and skinny jeans. Unfortunately, […]

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RIP, Yogi Berra

 

66653Yogi Berra — one of the greatest catchers in Major League Baseball history, and one of its wittiest sages — has died at 90, exactly 69 years to the day after his major league debut with the Yankees. Since then, he became a 15-time All Star, three-time American League MVP, and led teams from both leagues to the World Series as a manager. In all, he either played or managed 21 World Series, thirteen times for the winning team.

Berra was a beloved figure for the sayings he offered which came to be known as Yogi-isms, “It ain’t over ’til it’s over” probably being the most famous.  He once gave directions to his house as “When you come to the fork in the road, take it.”

One of the iconic images of his career is him hugging Don Larsen after Larsen threw a perfect game in the 1956 World Series. Not as widely known, is that Berra called the perfect game; Larsen didn’t shake him off once.

Still Celebrating the Worst Record in the History of Sport

 

2131Let’s dispense with the banalities. Forget Woody Allen. Success in life is about more than just showing up.

Twenty years ago Cal Ripken, Jr. broke Lou Gehrig’s record for consecutive games played. And the Orioles and Major League Baseball are still celebrating it. The contrarian in me cringes and yells, “What the…”

First the background: Gehrig’s streak was romanticized because of the way that it ended. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that can take the healthiest and most athletic person and quickly confine them to a wheelchair and then to death within five years.

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A Major League Baseball season has a lot in common with a presidential campaign. At some point you look at the numbers and you have to make a decision to either “ship or get off the spot,” so to speak. Friday at 4 ET the MLB trading deadline came and went. Those on the upside […]

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Save or Kill – Ricochet Edition

 

save or killThis past weekend, I did a pop-culture post based on a game Collider uses on its website called “Save or Kill.” The premise is that you are presented with two icons, both threatened with being wiped from existence forever, and must choose which of the two to save; you cannot save both. The game works best when you really love both icons, so it becomes a real Sophie’s Choice.

That first post didn’t get as many responses as I’d hoped — though my thanks to those who did participate, and there’s still time to jump in! — so I’m tailoring the game in this post with options better-suited to the interests of the Ricochetti.

So, read the list of the choices below and — in the comments — post which of the two icons you’d save for each of the ten choices. There’s no obligation to explain your reasoning, but I think it’ll be more fun with it. The criteria you use for judging is entirely up to you: you can do this based exclusively on personal preference, or on which option you feel is more important to society. Also, if you’re not familiar with both options in a scenario, feel free to abstain from that particular scenario.

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Note: This is a modified post from “Jackie Robinson Day,” first pubished in 2012. Something else interesting happened in April of 1912. Five days after RMS Titanic sunk, the Boston Red Sox opened Fenway Park. Needless to say, the “Pawk” has lasted a lot longer than the ship. Preview Open

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