Tag: bari weiss

Ali and Weiss: Two More Podcasts Worth Trying

 

Ayaan Hirsi Ali is something rare and beautiful, a truly heroic figure who has faced life-threatening adversity without flinching, and without surrendering an ounce of dignity or resolve. I recently listened to her June 3 podcast with Megyn Kelly, hosted on Ricochet, about Sexual Harassment in the Workplace, and appreciated the common sense expressed both by Ms. Ali and Ms. Kelly. As one of the few conservatives who has never heard Megyn Kelly speak, I was impressed by her thoughtfulness and intelligence — and, in particular, by her willingness to bluntly reject the absurd claims of the gender identity movement. And Ms. Ali’s is a voice I hope is never silenced; I applaud Ricochet for providing her a platform and hope she does well.

I also listened to a June 16 Podcast by Bari Weiss and her guest Martin Gurri. This podcast appears not to be hosted on Ricochet, so I found it here: Revolt of the Public. What particularly struck me about this interview was Ms. Weiss’s professionalism: she asks intelligent questions, follows up when appropriate, and comes across as a serious woman and a serious interviewer. Mr. Gurri, an ex-CIA employee who left Cuba as a child and has, as he put it, witnessed both right-wing and left-wing totalitarianism, speaks sensibly and optimistically (albeit with some caution) about America. His views on the Internet — that it is transformative and destructive — in many ways comport with my own. I found his rejection of the popular notion that America is a racist country refreshing. I’ll probably read his book, The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium.

In this episode, the guys keep it simple, discussing Bari Weiss’s departure from the New York Times. She quit and wrote a scathing open letter, detailing the reasons for her resignation. Also discussed is Andrew Sullivan’s departure from New York Magazine, with both stemming from what looks like intolerance from not only readers but staff members who increasingly are hostile to points of view that do not align with their own.

It has implications for those publications but the business of journalism overall. Will the guardians of these institutions stand up and say, “That’s enough!” or will they allow a bunch of Jacobins to control the editorial content?

Join Jim and Greg as they applaud former New York Times opinion writer Bari Weiss for resigning and blasting the Times for becoming a forum only for the far left. They also chronicle Joe Biden’s ongoing embrace of the Bernie Sanders agenda, which is curious since he was nominated for not being Bernie Sanders. And they dissect the ego and delusion required for New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to create a poster to explain what a terrific job he did handling the COVID outbreak in his state.

Attacks on Jews, and a Leftist’s Attempt to Speak a Bit of Inconvenient Truth

 

I read Bari Weiss’s new book, How to Fight Anti-Semitism out of curiosity. I wondered if she would really speak truth to power and slap the hand that pays her salary, the New York Times. She did not. She is a woman of the left and a talented columnist, both of which come across in this small, easily read volume. I do not envy her the task she set for herself. I do not know if anyone could write an approachable appeal, that would both address the prominent sources of anti-Semitism and keep the ear of even one major faction on either side of the great political divide.

This is a lengthy and critical review, arranged with the following section headers: “A few administrative details,” “Book outline,” “Too far right?” “Not far enough left?” “Naming radical Islam,” “Review of reviews,” and finally some closing thoughts under “Civility?” Fair warning: this ended up being a very critical review. For balance, you should go read Cathy Young’s review, and Melissa Langsam Braunstein at the Federalist, both of which I link and excerpt in the “Review of reviews” section.

A few administrative details: