Tag: Awards

Jim and Greg conclude the Three Martini Lunch Award season by announcing their choices for person of the year and turncoat of the year. They also make their fearless predictions for 2020.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America announce three more prestigious year-end awards. Today they look at the stories the mainstream media covered far too much, the ones they conveniently ignored because they didn’t fit their narrative, and what they saw as the best stories of 2018.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America begin handing out the prestigious year-end Three Martini Lunch Awards. In this first installment, they offer their individual selections for Most Underrated Political Figure, Most Overrated Political Figure, and Most Honest Political Figure. Yeah, we know there aren’t too many nominees for that last one.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America reveal their choices for the biggest Three Martini Lunch award categories. They explain their choices for Person of the Year, as Jim names someone he once dismissed as unserious and Greg selects a large group of people. They also hold nothing back in detailing which people most egregiously turned their backs on conservative principles in 2017. And they ditch their traditional New Year’s resolutions to offer fearless predictions for 2018. Happy New Year to all of our wonderful listeners. We will return on January 2, 2018.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America focus squarely on the media in this episode of the Three Martini Lunch awards. They begin by discussing two massive stories that media either ignore or are severely downplaying – one overseas and one here in the U.S. Then they switch gears to reveal which stories received far too much coverage in 2017. Finally, they choose what they see as the best stories of the past year.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have now passed the midpoint in the six-podcast series of Three Martini Lunch Awards. In this installment, they begin with the best idea of 2017. Jim chooses a journalistic decision while Greg selects a policy choice. They also unveil the worst ideas of the year, with Jim focusing on politics and Greg going with a legal decision. And they reveal the boldest tactic of the past 12 months. They actually agree on this one, but still discuss two major developments worthy of the award.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are back from celebrating Christmas and are ready to bestow more of their prestigious Three Martini Lunch Awards. Today, they discuss their choices for the worst political scandals of the year, with both having nomination having connections to the 2016 campaign. They also discuss their limited options for best political theater of the year and try to figure out what the worst political theater was in a year full of cringeworthy moments.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America unveil their choices in three more categories for Three Martini Lunch awards for 2017. They begin on a somber note by honoring figures they were sorry to see pass away in 2017. Jim chooses a peacemaker on the international stage and Greg highlights a joyful and faithful conservative in Washington. They also reveal their choices for rising political star, with both selections coming from the U.S. Senate. And they discuss the political characters who exited the political stage and are likely to soon be forgotten.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America have their tuxes on and are ready to begin handing out their crystal martini glass trophies as their six-part series on year-end political awards begins today. In this installment, Jim and Greg reveal their selections for most underrated political figure, with Jim reluctantly coming to what he sees as an obvious choice. They also name the most overrated figures and the people they see as the most honest in the arena of politics.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Oscar Reflections

 

Miss me, Ricochet? I’ve been busy trying to place my reflections on American-prestige-at-the-movies in various venues, trying to tell conservative America: Pay attention, at least a little attention, at least during awards season! The ugly truth is, it’s really hard to get people to care, but very easy to get them angry and contemptuous at Hollywood out-of-touch-elitism, so I’m busy trying to avoid all the dark passions. But while people still make lovely movies worth the praise, I will try to show you what they’re about and how to navigate through the sophisticated concerns that give poetry its great dignity.

So here’s my list of Awards movies conservatives should support, nay cherish. They’re all but one featured at the Oscars. I picked three all-American stories, two of which are true stories such that the movies actually understate the miracles they depict. They’ve all been remarkably successful at European art-movie festivals, even at the highest level. They’ve not been too successful in America, but they’re doing ok mostly, and getting another chance at prestige in awards season. This is the sort of stuff conservatives should support, both because it is poetry worth supporting and because it supports the conservative case for American goodness and greatness.

  1. Hacksaw Ridge. The best show of Christian America at war I can think of — so naturally, the conservative press ignores it altogether. A war picture, a remarkable technical achievement, independently financed and produced with great savvy — and then it gets lots of Oscar nominations, including the first for Mr. Mel Gibson in perhaps 20 years. Shock after shock. I think we should be bipartisan about this and do at least as much as Hollywood liberals have done, so I’m doing my part!
  2. Kubo and the Two Strings. This is the most beautiful surprise of 2016. A film almost entirely free of the sordid, which tells a broken-family story Americans should love, while at the same time doing the sophisticate poetic work of analyzing grief in terms of the grief song, threnody, and trying to show where poetry stands in-between the city and the moon.
  3. Hell or High Water. This was the anguished manliness movie of the year. I’ve written about it at length on my website, but those are notes for a very limited audience. I’ve also produced a popular essay, but I’ve not found someone willing to publish it yet…
  4. Loving. This is the most surprising sort of civil rights picture you’re going to see. It’s a respectful and very American portrayal of the moral virtues that make private life a joy, a shelter, and a benefit to the country as a whole at the same time. It’s one those true stories that makes so many of us wonder at the ways in which Americans are blessed and innocent.

Then there are movies really worth the attention of conservatives who care about the culture, but they are not really lovable and I cannot recommend them. I suppose I don’t need to, either, as they’ve been plenty successful:

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleased to see the Democrats’ strategy against Jeff Sessions accomplish nothing – and they point out why the strategy was so stupid. They also groan as the Obama administration’s self-congratulations tour continues with Obama giving Joe Biden the Presidential Medal of Freedom. And they react to Sen. Kamala Harris grilling CIA director nominee Mike Pompeo about climate change, while Jim explains the “sure, whatever” strategy he would employ at a confirmation hearing.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America begin their annual year-end awards presentations. Today they hand out their individual choices for most underrated, overrated, and honest political figures.

Member Post

 

I wanted to take a moment to show the sample artwork for an award certificate to be conferred upon filmmakers by members of the Ricochet Film Society. The award is named for Ricochet co-founders, Peter Robinson and Rob Long (which was the suggestion of @jamielockett). The certificate artwork has been sized at 9 x 12 […]

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Member Post

 

Must we as a nation go through yet another round of indignation and accusations of racism by yet another sector of the African-American population? Yes, we must, because that’s what we continue to do, well into the 21st century, fifty years after the wildly successful civil rights movement and nearing the end of the second […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. About Those Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Nominations

 

shutterstock_281750147If this morning’s nominations for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Class of 2016 are any indication, rock isn’t quite dead. Not yet, anyway. But it does appear to be resting.

We could — and probably will — argue about whether the existence of such an institution is in itself a nullification of the spirit of rock’n’roll. I await your comments.

In the meantime, here — though precisely no one asked for it — is my take on each of the nominees.