Tag: assimilation

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: One Nation, One Flag, No Hyphens

 

“The immigrant who comes here in good faith, becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the man’s becoming in very fact an American, and nothing but an American. If he tries to keep segregated with men of his own origin and separated from the rest of America, then he isn’t doing his part as an American. There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn’t an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag… We intend to see that the crucible turns our people out as Americans, of American nationality… We have room for but one soul loyalty, and that is loyalty to the American people.”
Theodore Roosevelt, address to the Knights of Columbus at Carnegie Hall in New York (12 October 1915)

We’ve heard conflicting arguments over what America is and who should be welcomed. I think Teddy Roosevelt’s statement makes a compelling case. America is a land of awesome wonders that millions have died for. It is not founded on a single ethnic or religious group, but a founding set of documents. If you swear to be an American, and to uphold the constitution, you are welcome here, no matter where you are from.

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Victor Davis Hanson describes the philosophical conceits employed by defenders of illegal immigration — and explains how they’re undermining American society. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Assimilation Is Stigmatized: Let’s Write a New Narrative

 

The United States has always taken pride in its ability to assimilate its new immigrants, creating an exciting and diverse fabric for the American ethos. Lately, though, there has been much discussion about the unwillingness of immigrants, legal or not, to assimilate into this country. I began to think about the meaning of assimilating, what it used to define and what has changed. It became clear to me that this is an issue that must be addressed and that may be even more serious than immigration problems themselves.

What does it mean to be absorbed or integrated into the culture?

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Richard Epstein responds to the controversy over an Obama-era policy allowing children brought to the U.S. Illegally to stay in the country and explains why America should embrace a more liberal immigration policy but reject open borders. More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Thoughts on Assimilation

 

shutterstock_363779384As I have mentioned before (e.g., here and here), I am an immigrant and so is my wife. Actually, if you want to get real technical, I am a refugee, admitted to this country under a special 1970s policy that favored Soviet Jews. Unlike me, my wife is a real immigrant who actually benefited directly from the 1965 Immigration Act. So at least in that one respect I suppose I should be grateful to Ted Kennedy. My family came to the United States during the second half of the Carter presidency, at or near Peak Disco and deep into the post-Vietnam civilizational funk. But glimmers of the good old America were still plentiful back then.

After a very brief stay in Houston, we settled in Allentown, Pennsylvania, a tidy, deeply working class town of 110,000 populated predominantly by the descendants of German religious dissidents who arrived in the 18th century and used Eastern Pennsylvania as a staging area for the settlement of much of the Ohio Valley and the Great Plains beyond. The big industrial employer in town was the venerable Mack Truck, whose bulldog mascot was emblazoned ubiquitously on t-shirts and mesh-and-foam caps. Down the road in Bethlehem, the steel mills were slowly sputtering to a halt, but their death rattle was still a few years away. The Lehigh Valley Mall off US 22 was freshly built, but Hamilton Street downtown was still where you went for your haberdashery, five-and-dime, and personal grooming needs. Hess’ was the big department store there, still family owned. The only skyscraper in town was a 24-story Rockefeller Center-in-miniature owned by the Pennsylvania Power and Light Company. The stately but dubiously named Hotel Traylor down the street unselfconsciously imitated The Plaza in New York. Down on the other end of Hamilton Street stood the Zion’s Reformed Church, under whose floorboards the Liberty Bell was hidden from British troops during the Revolutionary War – a source of much civic pride. My parents could not have found a more paradigmatic specimen of post-WWII Middle America. Had we arrived in the late 40s or late 50s, I doubt the place would have looked or felt much different.

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The bombing in Brussels has once again brought up the idea of assimilation and integration of immigrants and minority communities within western culture. The basic question is who is responsible for integrating new immigrants? It would seem that the new country and the immigrant groups have equal responsibilities; the host country should be welcoming and […]

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Continuously pretending that a group is somehow eventually going to become like the rest of us is perhaps the deepest form of disrespect. So says Trevor Phillips, the former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission, who says Muslims “see the world differently from the rest of us”. Who is Phillips? Is this a […]

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Over nine years, I witnessed the neighborhood become increasingly intolerant. Alcohol became unavailable in most shops and supermarkets; I heard stories of fanatics at the Comte des Flandres metro station who pressured women to wear the veil; Islamic bookshops proliferated, and it became impossible to buy a decent newspaper. With an unemployment rate of 30 […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Does Giving Immigrants Citizenship Improve Assimilation and Civic Participation?

 

shutterstock_155168414_SwissPassportYou wouldn’t know it by listening to Donald Trump, but rounding up and deporting — humanely, according to Trump — some 11 million undocumented/unauthorized/illegal immigrants would be pretty pricey. Lots of different estimates, but maybe anywhere from $100 billion to $600 billion, if preventing future illegal entry is also included.

Legal status for many or most undocumented immigrants already in the US seems more likely. One potential compromise is legalization without citizenship. Immigration expert Peter Skerry has outlined a plan for “permanent non-citizen resident” status. These immigrants would be prohibited from ever becoming eligible for naturalization — unlike green card holders — but they would have full access to the labor market. And that may be enough for most of the undocumented. Skerry notes that a quarter century after the 1980s amnesty, only 41 percent of the nearly 2.7 million individuals who became legal permanent residents had gone on to exercise the option to naturalize. In other words, when offered the chance to become citizens, the overwhelming majority of the undocumented have settled for less.

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A propos of nothing in particular…. Why did the Borg cross the road? More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Niqabs, Hijabs, and Habits: How Do We React?

 
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http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Sadah-Black-Ramadan-Eid-Abaya-AY306-Muslim-Clothing-Dress-Jilbab-Hijab-/251288183292

The presence of many women wearing head coverings is rather new to America. Under presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama many US cities have received large groups of designated refugees* from Muslim nations, and this has meant also receiving large groups of women who wear a variety of Muslim coverings ranging from headscarves, head and neck coverings, and full on coverings that leave only the face exposed (I have even observed the wearing of gloves). What are we to make of this recent phenomenon?

Columbus, Ohio was the butt of Ohio jokes for decades when compared with booming cultural and industrial centers like Cleveland, Cincinnati, and Toledo. It was known as a cow town and a farming clearing house, whose only notable industries were small regional insurance offices, regional banks, and some Westinghouse and AC Delco plants. Sure, we had a Bell Labs campus and the famed Battelle research institute, but we were still a small player compared to the other cities. That was the town I grew-up in. It’s not the Columbus that exists today.

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