Tag: Army

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. 2016 Documentary, Citizen Soldier, Freshly Relevant with News

 

45th Infantry Patch ThunderbirdCitizen Soldier is an excellent documentary, from soldiers’ perspectives, made freshly relevant by the infuriating revelations that top Department of Defense officials were blatantly violating their oaths of office and actively lying to the civilian elected leadership, President Trump and the Congress, about troops these excrement heaps in suits were keeping in harm’s way. President Eisenhower was entirely right to warn of the deeply corrupting congruence of profit and career in the name of our national security. To understand on whom the Department of Defense are really imposing costs, watch Citizen Soldier.

I finally viewed Citizen Soldier this past Friday with a group of friends who are not veterans. We were all a little skeptical when we popped the DVD in the player, worried that it would be amateurish and not the subject matter that lends itself to being so bad it is good. Everyone gave the movie a thumbs up. We had briefly talked about the forsworn, lawless leadership at the Department of Defense. This movie captured deployment at the height of the Obama Afghanistan surge. The comments after the lights came up were not entirely printable about the top Pentagon leadership then and now.

Citizen Soldier feels like a multiplayer first-person shooter, always from the perspective of one of the soldiers. The view over gun barrels will look very familiar if you ever played or saw a bit of a game being played on a computer screen. This is because the footage comes from small, light video cameras, like GoPro, mounted on the soldiers’ helmets. So, this was an intentional project, from before their deployment, to tell the story of a company company of “citizen soldiers,” the Oklahoma Army National Guard’s 45th Infantry Brigade Combat Team, known since World War II as the “Thunderbirds.” A thunderbird is on their diamond-shaped unit patch.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. My Husband, the Veteran

 

It is Veteran’s Day and, as usual, we’re going about our daily lives. We spare a thought for those who died and those who served. I have a particular fondness for a certain veteran, but I think about all of them. I think of the ways they have sacrificed for our country as well as other countries and I feel a sense of borrowed pride.

I have no claim to the pride myself; I never chose to enter the service. My life would be vastly different if I had. I suspect that I would have had much more opportunity, been promoted more quickly, learned new and exciting things that are not regularly taught in nursing school, and at least have my school loans paid off. I might even have a house of my own with one of those fancy VA loans.

Join Jim and Greg as they welcome NPR’s admission that it failed listeners in its favorable interview of a radical author who thinks property ownership is a form of white supremacy, although they wonder why such a person was ever invited onto NPR in the first place. They also roll their eyes as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo warns President Trump he would need an army to return safely to New York City. And they try to figure out why Nancy Pelosi decided to launch a conspiracy theory about her flouting of the San Francisco COVID restrictions instead of just letting the story die.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QotD: McVey on Reporters

 

Take it from me, America was a better place when its reporters were moody drunks with a high school education who learned to type in the Army.—Gary McVey

What could I say to improve on this? Gary nailed it. Reporters, uh, excuse me, journalists, or perhaps that should be spelled journalistes, with master’s degrees from high-end journalism schools have done the country no favors. Let’s go back to more guys (and gals) with practical real-world experience and shoe-leather reporting. James Lileks, Byron York, Salena Zito: these are some of the few good, old-style reporters we have today. Far better if we had ten of these for every Chris Cuomo.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Army Rolling in Homeland Defense

 

This is how we are not Italy. This is part of why we were ranked #1 in the world for pandemic preparedness. As Navy hospital ships prepare to leave their docks, Army field hospital units have been given deployment orders. Ride to the sound of the sirens?

Join us for three Iran-related martinis for you today. First, Jim and Greg are glad to see the likes of Russia and China offering nothing but word salad as no nation commits arms or manpower to Iran in the wake of the Soleimani strike. They also cringe as the Pentagon has to walk back a letter stating the U.S. Army would leave Iraq, only to have Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Mark Milley explain the letter was just a poorly worded draft that doesn’t accurately express our policy and was never intended to go public. And they unload on California Rep. Ro Khanna for suggesting that Pres. Trump retaliating against Iran could warrant another article of impeachment, with Jim wondering if the Democrats are starting an impeachment of the month club.

Member Post

 

There’s a story out of Seattle about Dick Clarke, an 85-year-old man who for the last 18 years rang a bell for the Salvation Army during every holiday season, collecting money for the homeless outside of Nordstrom’s downtown store. During those years he raised more than $100,000 for the cause. He also gained a whole […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Doodads and Army Duds [Updated with a fun puzzle!]

 

I had long thought the doodads festooning veteran organizational caps to be a bit silly and something of the past. This Veterans Day, I took another look and came to a different conclusion. Looking at veterans’ uniforms in a parade and watching the pudgy weasel almost popping out of his blue Army Service Uniform in Congress, I discovered two things.

The first realization was of a linkage between military and veteran customs. Look at any military member’s uniform and you will see a shorthand career biography. If you take the time to look up the various ribbons, badges, insignia, patches, crests and whatnot, you get a glimpse into where they served and some tokens of what they did.*

It should be no surprise that veterans would carry over the military habit of visible tokens on their uniform. On closer examination, those “funny” caps have been serving the same function as a uniform jacket. Since the cap is the whole of a veterans organization uniform, that is where various tokens of a veteran’s service are displayed. 

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Memory and Forgetfulness:Part 2

 

Seventy-five years ago, Operation Overlord was launched, opening a third land front in the strategic counteroffensive against Nazi Germany. The Germans were already reeling back from their high-water mark in the east (Stalingrad), and had squandered the cream of their veteran force in the Battle of Kursk during the summer of 1943. Predominantly American forces were slowly slugging their way up the length of Italy, where terrain favored competent defenders. It was finally time to open a western front with the sort of maneuver room found on the eastern front. We ought to pay tribute now, while there are still veterans of that great crusade with us.

The note here, dated July 5, was written by General Eisenhower, in case the D-Day landings failed. He praised “the troops, the air, and the navy,” and took total responsibility for the failure: “If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt, it is mine alone.” His message was ready for transmission to the Allied nations. Mercifully, it never needed to be sent.

Calling out the deeds and identities of World War II heroes, both lost and living, is especially fitting on this, “The Last Longest Day.”

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Starting on 10 May 1969, American soldiers, light infantry, fought for ten days to seize a hill in Vietnam. The fighting was so brutal that it quickly was named Hamburger Hill, as it was like advancing into a meat grinder. VFW Magazine has an article commemorating the battle, and the Washington Post actually has a […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Several years ago I had a small gathering of family and friends, and part of our reasons for coming together was to have a brief discussion on why we loved this country. My husband and I were the hosts, and my brother-in-law, sister-in-law, another couple who were friends of ours, and my aunt and uncle attended. […]

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Member Post

 

TOCradio Site Link: http://tocradio.libsyn.com/ or direct Episode 5 Link Matt Schoenfeldt and Wyatt Harper are joined by LTC Mike Barnett, who is the 8th Army Knowledge Manager. We discuss how the Army goes through the whole process from acquisition, capture, organization, storage, sharing, and application of knowledge. Mike takes us through the Human Dimensions and […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Celebrating the Flag and the Army on June 14th

 

June 14th is officially designated both Flag Day and the Army Birthday in the United States. These two are intertwined, as the need for a flag, and the need of an army, arose from our bid for independence. The Army traces its birthday to an act of the Continental Congress in 1775, more than a year before the Declaration of Independence. The flag’s birthday is traced to another act of the Continental Congress, one year after the Declaration of Independence. The Army has marched under the flag, in its many configurations, and sometimes come home draped in the flag.

Happy 243rd Birthday, Army!

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America breathe a sigh of relief as the U.S. Army announces it will scrap a rule that would allow waivers for people dealing with depression, bipolar disorder or self-mutilation to apply to serve. They also slam Minnesota Sen. Al Franken after one of his colleagues on a 2006 USO tour accuses Franken of a forced kiss and provides a photo of him groping her while she is asleep. And they respond bluntly to a New York Times op-ed from a Christianity Today writer who thinks the Mike Pence policy of a man never being along with a woman other than his wife is a damaging to women’s careers and is actually a “sanctified cousin” to “Weinstein-ian behavior.

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Dateline: Somewhere in the Desert Private Kenny Schnozzola is one happy soldier. In an interview with this reporter, he says, “Joining the army was the best thing that’s ever happened to me. I was born with my dad’s big nose. I mean it was a real honker. But all my life, I’d identified as Rob […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Heavy Hangs the Head

 
Sgt. Elor ‎Azaria.

Some issues are harder to write about than others. Some touches of the keyboard are ‎preceded by doubt and confliction, juggling the impulses of the heart alongside the ‎knowledge of the mind. Nothing sums up this battle more than the sorrowful saga of the Israeli soldier Sgt. Elor ‎Azaria, and as I follow the news of the verdict in his case, I gather that little resolution or ‎healing will come of it. Azaria has come to be a symbol of whatever either side of this ‎argument thinks is right, and that is a form of emotional argumentation that is perhaps ‎understandable but potentially harmful to the fabric of the Israeli nation. ‎

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. What’s Still Great About Sports

 

PHILADELPHIA - DECEMBER 8: The offensive line of the Army Black Knights gets set to snap the ball during a game against the Army Black Knights on December 8, 2012 at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The Navy won 17-13. (Photo by Hunter Martin/Getty Images)

A contemporary sports fan with a brain surveys the pro and college sports landscapes and is forced to consider, “is this really worth my time, money, and energy?”

Astronomical salaries, lunatic agents, endless analysis, coaches who think they’re Patton, and fans who feel every blown call is a grounds for an appeal to the Supreme Court — it all takes its toll.