Tag: Armistice Day

In Flanders Fields

 

In Flanders Fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders Fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:

Remembrance Day Weather: Rain in France

 

mediaThe official observances in France, were under rain. Indeed, the rains were heavy enough to repeatedly interfere with the satellite TV transmission signal back to C-SPAN. You see that in the multi-national ceremony and in President Trump’s address at a war memorial for Americans. The rain, and the disruption, is so appropriate to the commemoration of a war in which men lived in muddy trenches, never really dry, for years. Feet, constantly wet, started disintegrating. It was called “trench foot” and is called “immersion foot syndrome.” [Emphasis added.]

Trench foot, or immersion foot syndrome, is a serious condition that results from your feet being wet for too long. The condition first became known during World War I, when soldiers got trench foot from fighting in cold, wet conditions in trenches without the extra socks or boots to help keep their feet dry.

Trench foot killed an estimated 2,000 American and 75,000 British soldiers during WWI. 

Member Post

 

In memory of my great-uncle John Collins.  As a child he survived the Galveston Flood. Moved with his family to the Cherokee Strip in Oklahoma and helped work a Land Rush farm. Joined the AEF in Enid and went off to WWI.  Died in the trenches in France. Buried at Arlington.  His four brothers stayed […]

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Member Post

 

It is Remembrance Day in Britain. This is the day on which people were once called to remember the armistice that ended the Great War &, thereby, to reflect on the war. It could be remembered once concluded, but the mind is stunned at the recollection. What is the meaning of this war? Why was it fought […]

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