Tag: anti-racism

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The president of Dartmouth College must have had multiple letters written ahead of time that addressed different possible verdicts, because I’ve already received an email containing his letter about the Chauvin verdict. The letter is a disgrace (emphasis added): To the Dartmouth community, Preview Open

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Christopher Rufo joins Brian Anderson to discuss his recent work on critical race theory (CRT) in American schools, the whistleblowers behind much of his reporting, and President Biden’s decision to revoke former president Donald Trump’s executive order banning CRT-inspired training in the federal government.

Find the transcript of this conversation and more at City Journal.

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Dartmouth College, like any higher education institution, sends out all the usual periodic emails from administration officials, various academic departments, and the medical staff’s COVID-19 updates. To give you all an idea of the current intellectual climate and political views of the administration and selected members of the faculty, I’ve excerpted parts of some of […]

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The San Francisco Chronicle ran an interesting op-ed this morning from a black student who describes how they were stigmatized for the being “Asianized” when they focused on academics.  This piece provides an interesting counterpoint to the notion on the left that disparities between ethnic groups can be explained only by racism and not other […]

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Christopher Rufo joins Seth Barron to discuss his reporting on federal agencies using “critical race theory” as part of their personnel-training programs and President Trump’s decision to issue an executive order prohibiting it.

Marxist Wokism: The Christian Heresy

 

In my pastor’s sermon today, he talked about America being a pagan and post-Christian society. I certainly agree that we are in a post-Christian one, but “pagan” is not the right term.

Pagan societies, at least the ones we know about, have a few shared characteristics. They were self-perpetuating as societies; that is, they created an ethos that promoted families (even the ones that practiced child sacrifice and exposing infants still made sure they had enough children for a stable population), protected private property (don’t buy the “Native Americans didn’t understand land ownership” fraud), and inculcated respect for order, authority, and defending the tribe/polis/empire. They had, in other words, the virtues necessary to survive.

Heather Mac Donald joins Seth Barron to discuss YouTube’s restriction of her livestreamed speech on policing, allegations of widespread racial bias in the criminal-justice system, and the ongoing reversal of public-safety gains in New York City.

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BOULDER, COLO. After hours of steady rainfall Wednesday afternoon, drivers on Boulder’s I-476 were surprised to see the chalky, white outline of what some are calling a “noose” emblazoned on a highway overpass. “As you can see, racism is built into the very fabric of the city,” said Naropa University women’s studies/interpretive dance professor Lesbia […]

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If you are looking around the world and seeing conflict and strife, know that not everyone sees this as bad.The dream of socialism was for rich and poor to emphasize what separates them: “heighten the contradictions” to “raise class consciousness” to generate “class conflict” and hasten the revolution. Since Gramsci in the 20s, the conflict […]

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It Goes Without Saying

 

A groundswell of anti-racism flags and position statements seems to be taking over many public and social media venues. My Amazon shopping app now opens with a statement that “Amazon stands in solidarity with the Black community” and invites shoppers to “read about what we’re doing” on a specially designated landing page. My neighborhood NextDoor.com CEO has issued a strong statement that the Nextdoor community will not tolerate racist language in our community networking posts. And you can validate for yourself that many other examples abound.

As to the Nextdoor position, my wife, alarmed that such a statement needed to be put forth did a quick check over the history of posts to our Nextdoor site and found no such language ever being used. Maybe it had been used and deleted? I’m doubtful.

Social Justice?

 

For evidence of the social justice movement’s moral bankruptcy, look no further than its own language.

All it sees are causes for complaint. All it offers is etiquette for protests. Take orders from people of colorAcknowledge your privilegeCall out implicit bias! Its vision of a just society, insofar as it has one, is hazy and surreal, like the Christian vision of heaven or the world after Christ’s return. It lacks a goal; it has no endgame beyond uniting all people in mutual hatred of systemic oppression.

City Journal contributing editors Coleman Hughes and Rafael Mangual discuss the protests and riots across the United States—including attacks on police officers—and the dispiriting state of American racial politics. The unrest began last week, in the aftermath of George Floyd’s death in police custody in Minneapolis.

The disorder should not be surprising, Mangual notes, because “police have been the targets of a poisonous, decades-long campaign to paint law enforcement as a violent cog in the machine of a racially oppressive criminal-justice system.” Hughes wonders whether fixing the perception that police are unfair to black Americans is even achievable.