Tag: anger

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” The storm exposes our vulnerability and uncovers those false and superfluous certainties around which we have constructed our daily schedules, our projects, our habits and priorities. It shows us how we have allowed to become dull and feeble the very things that nourish, sustain and strengthen our lives and communities. The tempest lays bare […]

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The Destructiveness of Anger

 

“Anger is an acid that can do more harm to the vessel in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured.” — Mark Twain

People who are angry in these times feel justified in their fury. The world seems out of control, while scientists and doctors expound on the devastating impact of a perplexing virus. We, however, want someone, anyone, to be able to explain everything, right now, in a way that makes sense and can be digested by all of us.

When the “authorities” give us information with certainty, we are angry with them because we simply don’t believe them. When they share their views with qualifiers, we are angry because we want certainty. And we want to blame someone, anyone for the lack of complete understanding of what is happening, and a sensible strategy for moving forward.

We’re Losing Our Boys

 

The latest tragedies, raw and painful, seem to be reflecting a similar thread: young men. Look at the age of the recent shooter at a Walmart in Texas (21 years old,) the killer in Dayton (24), the age of the boy being accused of the murder of the young co-ed at Ole Miss. Look at the ages of the boys on a murderous rampage across Canada, the Florida school shooting, the recent California shooting at the Garlic Festival, the Synagogue in Pittsburgh. They are all young men consumed with hate and vengeance, and armed to do as much damage as possible. They leave “manifestos,” they shout, “I’m angry!”, they cease to think and feel, or see their fellow human beings as part of their world.

The struggle to find blame is next. Social media, politics, violent video games, rampant porn and the new virile push of social engineering are playing a role. Young men begin as young boys, innocent, but are being influenced by all of these things, and their core personalities, their sense of self, is being corrupted, at younger and younger ages. I am not sympathizing with the killers, these acts are beyond despicable, but the patterns are showing these similarities.

The radical group Antifa, whose network now stretches across the continent to Europe, is composed of young men mostly, very angry, courting physical confrontation, and at the very least, intimidation and control.  Young women have become more fearful and maybe rightly so.  I have to think that the removal of boundaries, lack of consequences for actions, monitoring what is being taught in schools, what is accessible on the Internet, the decline of the family and faith, are now all bearing rotten fruit.  The family and the Church have always been the armor before sending young people into the world to live their dream and find their purpose, and to sustain them going forward.

Apology Accepted

 

Making an apology comes naturally for some folks and can be very trying for others. We can store up an abundance of reasons not to apologize: it wasn’t my fault, he deserved it, I was right, she was wrong, it’s too late, it’s too soon. Even for those of us who will generally own up to our mistakes, apologizing can be difficult.

Recently I overreacted to a situation and was rude in response to something that was said. I had no way of knowing that I had misunderstood what was said, so was my rudeness really my fault? Yes. It was. But one of the challenges to offering an apology is getting past our own embarrassment and self-consciousness and just admitting we goofed.

Dear Internet: Stop Being Offended

 

As long as there’s been an internet, there’s been outrage. Whether you hung out on an America Online channel, a CompuServe message forum, or alt.politics.usa.screaming.eagle, there was a market for yelling at anonymous strangers about the news of the day.

With the internet saturation provided by iPhones and social media, outrage is ubiquitous. People want attention and it’s easier to get it through anger than reason. But all this taking of offense is poisoning the public square, civil society, and all of our health (mental and physical).

Playing with Fire

 

There was this guy who hated his brother. We’re not sure why; usually there’s more than one reason, or one reason leads to another that leads to another that may have little or nothing to do with the stated object. But anyway, hatred started with anger. Someone asked the guy, “Why are you angry?” He couldn’t answer. The questioner went on, “If you do well, will you not be rewarded? But if you don’t, evil is crouching at the door. It desires to have you. Shouldn’t you rule over it?”

The questioner was God and the guy was Cain, the first murderer (Genesis 4:7). Killing his brother was the first crime of passion and anger was the first passion.

It’s the first passion for all of us. We’re born angry, or at least severely peeved: Why did you people yank me out of my safe, warm place? Why don’t you feed me, hold me, reassure me? We’re supposed to grow out of it, but growing takes a while. Anyone who’s ever had small children knows how one little slight can set them off, and it feels so good to kick and scream they keep right on kicking and screaming until the little fire burns out. If you ask, “Why are you angry?” they couldn’t tell you. Though some children are more volatile than others, all are vulnerable. In fact, rage comes upon a child so suddenly, so naturally, it must be part of old Cain: a simmering pot on our unbalanced will ready to boil over as soon as the heat is turned up I once heard a preacher say, speaking of a child in the throes of rage, “If he could, he’d kill you.” Creepy. And probably true.

Member Post

 

Fewer Tears, Fewer Lies, and More Righteous Anger, by Kurt Schlichter, on Townhall today.  (on my tablet, tried to copy and paste, didn’t work). Seems others ‘get it’, as I tried to write in my post, Why Not Be Human?  Kurt does it better, and with more detail, than I did, but the core sentiment […]

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Member Post

 

Apologizing seems to be on my radar screen these days. The media (or Trump’s people) are demanding that Mitt Romney must apologize before Trump should consider making Romney Secretary of State. Here on Ricochet, many people have stated that they must receive apologies from others before they can move on following the election. So I […]

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2016 and the River of Slime

 

gbriverofslime4Ghostbusters 2 was a lousy movie but watching the dumpster fire that is the 2016 primaries, I can’t stop thinking of that subterranean river of pink slime.

EGON: Negative human emotions are materializing in the form of a viscous, psychoreactive plasm with explosive supernormal potential.

MAYOR: Does anybody speak English here?

Member Post

 

I just had a thought today that put together two things that I hadn’t put together before:  1. The “sudden” pouring out of the anger at the establishment just when it seemed we had a slate of candidates that were far superior to the previous 5 or 6 Presidential election cycles.  Preview Open

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Member Post

 

It was 1989 and we’d taken the family motorhome on a trip up to Canada.  My parents had always wanted to drive through Quebec, but I think my mother misunderstood my father about the phrase “drive through Quebec.”  The last 2 years of work had been especially rough, and other family trips had been cancelled […]

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