Tag: American Revolution

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There are moments in life that alter history, some of them present themselves as flashy and incontrovertible, while others are shattering and beyond comprehension. The historian’s job is to catalog these moments for the benefit of society. Some historians find the task set before them to be a license to skew the analysis to fit […]

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The American Revolution was not just about battles, international politics, and the men who willed the nation into being. It was also about the changes occurring in society that took men and women from observers in the political system to active participants. This was a period of intense strife among the civilian population. Those who […]

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At the height of the American Revolution, a violent upsurge of populism set Pennsylvanians against each other. On October 4th, 1779, militia and agitators paraded down the streets of Philadelphia with four prominent conservatives in their custody. Their intent was force the men onto a ship bound for the British stronghold of New York – […]

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Bernie Sanders Is Not Running for President of the United States . . .

 

. . . He is campaigning to overthrow the existing U.S. Constitutional government and replace it with a new government. That new government will be based on principles completely different from the principles of the existing US government.

I happened to hear a portion of Mr. Sanders’ announcement video and was horrified by the level of revolution I heard in the short clip. I looked further to be sure the segment hadn’t been taken out of context. I don’t think it was. I hesitated to post this (I’m really not a crazy conspiracy theorist), but so many ideas that are antithetical to the founding principles of the United States republic are now considered acceptable or even desirable that I thought Bernie Sanders’ announcement was a place to plant a stake.

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Progress, Immigration, and the Question of Rule

 

One of the complaints in the Declaration of Independence addresses the king’s position on immigration. Let’s have a look, shall we?

He has endeavored to prevent the population of these States, for that reason obstruction the Laws for Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migrations hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands.

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ACF Founders Series #3: John Marshall

 

Historian Richard Brookhiser returns to the podcast for our third conversation on a Founder–in this case, the man most responsible for the Supreme Court–John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice, a log cabin Federalist, a patriotic soldier in the Revolution and a very successful lawyer, who then served in all three branches of government. (You read that right: The first three CJs thought the job wasn’t worth it…) Mr. Brookhiser is just publishing his biography of Marshall, the last of the great Federalists, out the week after the election, so go order it, buy it, read it, and let everyone know! We’ve already covered two great Federalists — Hamilton and Gouverneur Morris — so by now we can show fairly well what it was like to be the first party in government in American history.

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‘Turncoat’ Offers a Fresh Look at Benedict Arnold

 

Benedict Arnold has become synonymous with treason. Yet few today know his story. Turncoat: Benedict Arnold and the Crisis of American Liberty, by Stephen Brumwell is a fresh look at the man and his times.

Arnold was a brilliant general, probably only second to George Washington in talent. Next to Washington, he may be most responsible for the survival of the patriot cause. His dogged defense on Lake Champlain in 1776, and his spirited attacks in the Saratoga campaign in 1777, defeated Britain’s northern offensive and led France to enter the revolution on the American side. Absent Arnold, Britain would likely have won by 1778. Three years later, he tried to give Britain the war by betraying West Point to them.

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Quote of the Day: On George III, Spectacles, and a Name Writ Large

 

On August 2, 1776, 242 years ago today, the parchment manuscript generally thought of as the original “Declaration of Independence” was signed by most of its 56 final signatories. First in line was the President of the Second Continental Congress, one John Hancock, who signed his name larger than anyone else, and, after doing so, is reputed to have proclaimed our quote of the day, something very similar to: “There! King George and his ministry can read that without spectacles! They can double the price on my head now.”

In fact, these men were not signing the original Declaration of Independence. That one, known as the “fair copy,” was assembled by Thomas Jefferson from earlier drafts, and it was signed by John Hancock alone, on July 4, 1776. It was sent off so copies could be printed, and then lost, perhaps in the printing process itself. Subsequently, approximately 200 broadside copies of the Declaration were printed, with Hancock’s name included in printed form only.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are more than happy to run against a Democratic Party that is now embracing socialism, and they worry that young people don’t understand socialism or its history. They shake their heads at “conservative” Max Boot, who wrote for the Washington Post that he wants […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review on Ricochet on the following Sunday. More

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Wednesdays. When it appears, I post the review on Ricochet on the following Sunday. More

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Thomas Paine, “Every history of the creation,…however they may vary in their opinion or belief of certain particulars, all agree in establishing one point, the unity of man; by which I mean that men are all of one degree, and consequently that all men are born equal, and with equal natural right, in the same […]

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Since this is the anniversary of the opening of the Erie Canal, it gives me an excuse to plug a book I narrated for Audible last year: Building the Empire State. It starts with the process of “settling the Revolution,” deciding how much of royal government structure to retain while designing a new country and economy. […]

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Sunday. When it appears, I post the previous week’s review on Ricochet. Seawriter More

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I write a weekly book review for the Daily News of Galveston County. (It is not the biggest daily newspaper in Texas, but it is the oldest.) My review normally appears Sunday. When it appears, I post the previous week’s review on Ricochet.  More

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It was the largest battle of the American Revolution, and most people don’t know its name or what happened. If asked, most Americans might be able to hazard a guess that it was Yorktown. But they would be mistaken. More

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I am. It’s enjoyable seeing depictions of events happening during our war for independence, based on real life characters, including George Washington. The characters and situations are pretty real, even the characters from the mother country. The series is about how we learned the importance of developing spy networks at a crucial time in our […]

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Yuval Levin on the Revolution That Wasn’t

 

In the latest episode of Uncommon Knowledge, I interviewed Yuval Levin — the Hertog Fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Founding Editor of National Affairs magazine and Senior Editor of The New Atlantis — about his most recent book, The Great Debate: Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, and the Birth of Right and Left.

In this exchange, Yuval explains Burke’s views on the American war for independence — and why he refused to refer to it as a “revolution.”

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