Tag: American Politics

Member Post

 

There are plenty of odd moments in the 2022 election season. Thus are the times. New York Democrats played musical chairs following a topsy-turvy US House reapportionment debacle in the Empire State. The head of the House Democrats’ campaign committee, Sean Patrick Maloney, controversially bumped a progressive black incumbent out of one district and now […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

The Democrats’ Hermetically Sealed World

 

I was barely 16, a high school junior growing up in a small conservative farm town in Oklahoma. I was weirdly interested in politics, especially for a teenager. Not long after President Nixon won a massive landslide in the 1972 election over his challenger, US Sen. George McGovern (D-SD), I remembered a quote from Pauline Kael being bandied about in the media. At the time, she was the film critic for the New Yorker. I’ve kept it all these years.

Nixon’s landslide should have surprised no one. McGovern’s campaign was a mess almost from the start of the Democratic National Convention when he gave his acceptance speech so late that almost no one watched it. He was forced to ditch his first running mate, Senate colleague Thomas Eagleton (D-MO), over psychiatric treatment (electric shock) reasons for Kennedy family icon and our nation’s first Peace Corps director, Sargent Shriver. That didn’t help.

The Media’s Fetterman Fail

 

Like most people, even Pennsylvanians, I didn’t watch Tuesday night’s lone debate between the Keystone State’s two major party nominees for US Senate. More important than the debates themselves is what people and the press say about them afterward – the “echo chamber.” That’s what people see and hear, and it drives polling numbers and final momentum.

And what’s being said about Tuesday’s debate is incredible. There’s never been a debate like this, at least in modern political history.

What is clear: John Fetterman, his campaign, and his political party covered up – lied – about the true nature of his mental, if not his physical, condition after a debilitating stroke on May 13, just days before the Democratic primary. Here’s what his campaign said two days after his stroke:

Member Post

 

We’re finally in the final phases of the 2022 election. Campaigns, of course, start well before Labor Day, but it remains the traditional start of the general election campaign in most states (some, like New Hampshire, have late primaries). While roughly a third of voters typically make up their minds early, more than half often […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Et Tu, National Hockey League?

 

Ice hockey is a popular winter sport. It originated and remains popular in our coldest climates. Think Canada. Or, perhaps Sweden, Finland, and Norway. Even Russia. Those countries and the United States usually win medals at the annual world championships and the quadrennial Winter Olympics. Professional ice hockey leagues permeate almost every European country, including the Baltics.

In the United States, some children who grow up in northern Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, and the far reaches of northern New England learn to skate at the same time they learn to walk. It is one of the most challenging sports to play, played on ice at high speeds and requiring enormous hand-eye coordination, with no small amount of violence.

Free the People’s Building

 

My reader knows I am a former US Senate official – the 28th Secretary of the Senate, the chamber’s chief legislative, financial, and administrative officer. Being nominated to that position by US Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole remains my greatest professional honor and privilege. I’m proud of my service during a historical time (104th Congress, 1995-96).

My reader may not know that since leaving that job in December 1996, I have conducted countless tours for visitors worldwide and fellow Americans, including a few trips up to the top of the Capitol dome. I learned early that one of the Secretary’s public responsibilities is to educate people about the history and significance of the US Senate, a role I have proudly continued in my post-public employment days.

Chad Benson remains in for Greg Corombos, and the midterms are heating up. Chad and Jim wonder whether Kathy Hochul’s shrinking lead in New York is significant, gaze across the Atlantic at a leadership crisis in the United Kingdom, and wonder why Arizona Democratic gubernatorial candidate Katie Hobbs is so scared to get on a debate stage with Kari Lake.

My “Early Election Returns” Scorecard, Part II

 

This is Part 2 of the series of my election-night scorecard of races to watch to see how big the tide will be that may sweep Republicans into control of the US House, Senate, and state and local offices. You can find Part 1 here. If you missed it, it sets the stage. Let’s continue where we left off.

New Jersey’s 7th District, Tom Kean Jr. versus incumbent Tom Malinowski

My “Early Election Returns” Scorecard, Part I

 

We are now t-minus 20 days from the 2022 elections. It’s about now that I customarily begin eyeballing well-crafted public opinion surveys and national and state election dynamics (debates, candidate performance, local issues, etc.), as many campaigns fall by the wayside.

Early voting is well underway in more than a dozen states. We’re in the throes of televised debates, a final round of endorsements, and the final flurry of attack ads and “October surprises.” Lawyers are being hired for the inevitable recounts.

Member Post

 

NOT by mail. This year’s election day in the US is November 8th – always the first Tuesday after the first Monday, by federal law. Other than setting dates for federal elections, the Constitution gives states and localities the responsibility for how elections are conducted. Preview Open

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

Of all the abuses and politicization of Congress the past 3 years, from the pandemic to the January 6th Capitol riots, instituting proxy voting for US House floor votes may be the worst. And that’s with stiff composition from the unprecedented and partisan construction of the Special Committee on January 6th. Or forcing 25,000 mostly […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Still on Team Herschel

 

My Philly friend Christine Flowers has penned an excellent and insightful Substack post about the single-anonymous-sourced hit piece on Georgia Republican US Senate candidate and football legend Herschel Walker. He has repeatedly and clearly denied these most recent charges, which I won’t repeat here since Christine has mentioned them. Read and subscribe to her work.

I would simply add two points. First, this is not the Daily Beast’s first rodeo at scurrilous tabloid journalism. I respect no one employed there, including the once-respected Matt Lewis. It is a bad place that harms journalism and the body politic.

Second, it is increasingly clear that “October surprises” don’t work as they used to. The Gore campaign and their allies’ dump of an alleged DUI by GOP nominee George W. Bush in late October 2000 suppressed some votes, but the more devastating “Hollywood Access” tape from October 2016 didn’t work against Donald Trump.

Ben, We Hardly Knew Ye

 

I remember the first time I met Ben Sasse, sitting and chatting next to him at a GOP fundraising breakfast in Virginia in June 2014. My former boss, retiring US Sen. Jon Kyl (R-AZ), introduced us. “He’s the real deal,” Kyl said. Coming from the highly respected Assistant GOP Leader, that meant something. I’ve long held Kyl in high regard as one of the most effective and intelligent Senators I’ve worked with.

The Harvard and St. John’s educated Sasse was the favorite of National Review magazine among US Senate candidates that fall, winning a cover photo. Then-42 years old, the bright, brash young conservative was seen as a potential presidential candidate.

The Ph.D. historian (Yale University) and, in his 30s, a successful college President (he turned around Midland University in Nebraska) immediately impressed. He homeschooled his children and wrote about their education, including detasseling corn. “Ben is focused on the future of work, the future of war, and the First Amendment,” his official website states. “He worries that the Senate lacks urgency about cyber and about the nation’s generational debt crisis. An opponent of perpetual incumbency, he has no intention of spending his life in the Senate.”

Member Post

 

I get the temptation to criticize every action and utterance by President Biden. I fall for it frequently, and I hope justifiably. It’s a target-rich environment. After all, he’s botched so much, from the Afghanistan debacle in 2021 to hosing the economy with deficit spending and ending America’s energy independence. And that’s just for starters. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Cheering for … the Hurricane?

 

If anything should be exempt from politics, it is our response to natural disasters.

After all, they don’t discriminate. Hurricanes and tornadoes come to mind. They painfully remind us of the dark side of nature’s awesome power. Growing up in Oklahoma – tornado alley – I’ve seen enough evidence and reminders of their destruction.

Member Post

 

When teaching a college class or giving a talk about the history and organization of the US Senate, I always include this: When Congress enacted the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, it created six “leadership” positions within each political party’s caucus or conference. They are, in descending order: Floor (majority or minority) Leader; Assistant Leader […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ), has probably won higher praise from Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) than he’s bestowed on any of his estimable first-term GOP colleagues. Newly-elected US Senator Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) was sworn into the Senate by then-VP Mike Pence in 2019. She previously served six years in the US House. Preview […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.