Tag: Affordable Housing

Autumn Colors: The Color of Law, an in-depth review

 

When people are free to associate as they please, we can’t be surprised if they sometimes self-segregate. People self-sort along many affinities, including ethnic affinities. This is what lawyers call de facto segregation, and it’s none of the law’s business. De jure segregation — segregation imposed by law, including segregation promoted by public policy — is, on the other hand, very much the law’s business.

In 1866, Congress passed a Civil Rights Act (the 1866 CRA) asserting the equal rights of blacks before the law, including property rights, and real-estate rights in particular. The 1866 CRA warned

Creating Affordable Housing Oregonians Can’t Afford

 

“If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there’d be a shortage of sand.” — Milton Friedman

Not too long ago, it was mentioned that Oregon had passed legislation to implement statewide Rent Control. This was in response to a crisis in affordable housing. The state government, presently run by a Democrat governor and supermajority in legislature, saw this as a move to curb the rising costs of housing, mostly in the Portland metro area. As far as I can tell, no one has reported a housing shortage over in Baker City, but the state government clearly knows better. It has run full tilt in spite of common sense warnings from anyone remotely familiar with economics. Once again, facts don’t matter if you are “morally right,” or something like that.

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The Hobbit-hole is a tubular, subterranean dwelling, built into a hillside. Hills are of course a scarce resource in a dense city, especially in a place like Hong Kong, which is naturally hilly, but very built up. Architect James Law has come up with an ingenious urban solution for those craving that tubular, subterranean feel: […]

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This week on Banter, Ed Glaeser explained how entrepreneurship helps America’s cities to thrive as well as options to make housing in these prosperous cities more affordable. Glaeser, a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, is the Fred and Eleanor Glimp Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University where he teaches microeconomic theory and urban and public economics. His research focuses on determinants of city growth and the role of cities as centers of idea transmission. Glaeser participated in the sixth annual AEI and CRN conference on housing risk. The link below will take you to the full event video.

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Richard Epstein describes how government interventions have driven the Golden State’s housing prices to extraordinary heights.

Richard Epstein looks at New York’s recent efforts to crack down on the short-term home rentals offered by Airbnb.

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Last week’s Snowmaggedon brought out the usual zombie-apocalypse furor in my New Jersey township. Before the storm, every checkout aisle at the store was ten persons deep and the shelves were cleared of bottled water and rock salt. People white-knuckled their grocery carts and had that “I’ll go mano a mano with you for that […]

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