Tag: Advertising

Female Fantasies? The Nose Knows!

 

Glade Autumn GlampfireScented candles. What are they for? Ask a man, and you might get varying answers – for masking the stank of indifferent housekeeping; for turning one’s home into a firetrap (bonus if careless children and pets serve as the arsonists); for frittering away money; for making grown men sneeze. Like cushions, scented candles seem an item of home decor most men could do without. Indeed, 90% of candles are purchased by women. Yet candles grace seven out of ten households and come in more than 10,000 different scents for US customers alone.

As the autumn nights draw in, even earlier now that our clocks are set back, the clever advertisers at Glade invite you into the mind of their typical female consumer, so you can see what all the scented fuss is about. “LET TEMPTATION FILL THE AIR,” Glade’s ad proclaims, as a sultry alto invites you to “Dare to let fragrance take you places you never thought you’d go…”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MocSwKG7gzA

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This PJMedia list of vintage racist and sexist ads got me thinking. The number one goal of advertising today is simply getting people to pay attention. Shock is the usual means. How long will it be before advertisers steal a page from the Trump playbook and start using casual racism and sexism? I mean, it […]

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27 years ago, the New York Times fretted that alcohol and tobacco companies were putting too many advertisements in poor neighborhoods.  ”This marketing strategy is outrageous and immoral,” said Harold P. Freeman, director of surgery of Harlem Hospital and national president of the American Cancer Society. ”The cigarette industry just wants to make money because […]

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Ted Cruz’s Ad Game Is Strong

 

‘Tis the season of political ads. About 47 percent of them are uninspired and another 52 percent are downright embarrassing. This cycle, the remaining one percent belong to Senator Ted Cruz. Today his campaign revealed a pitch-perfect parody of the printer scene from Office Space, which itself is a parody of gangster movies:

Television Ads? Meh.

 

shutterstock_133717460In a pre/post-mortem of the New Hampshire Primary and Iowa Caucus, The Economist tried to figure out what return the Republican candidates got for the tens of millions of dollars they spent on television ads. I’m no expert in these matters and haven’t played around with the original data but — with the stipulation that this is a difficult subject to study empirically — they seem to have made a good effort to provide controls and add some real, if tentative, information to the debate.

Their answer: meh. Or perhaps, MEH:

For all the talk of data-driven outreach and micro-targeted get-out-the-vote efforts, television advertising is still the staple on campaign shopping lists. Yet proof that candidates are getting a return on this investment has long been hard to find. Study after study has shown that few voters are motivated or persuaded by advertising—a finding political scientists have repeated so often that it is now known as the “minimal-effects hypothesis” (MEH).

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Since reading Claire Berlinski’s post on Putin’s propaganda earlier this month, I’ve sort of kept my eyes open for instances of it. The following are screenshots (literally taking pictures of the screen because I don’t know how to take a screenshot on my phone) of Suggested/Sponsored posts that have appeared in my Facebook news feed […]

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Greetings from Israel. Much reading and podcast listening on my trip (thx Ricochet!) Wanted to share a Goldman Sachs Entrepreneur Summit Podcast which interviewed the CEO of a new company I hadn’t heard of until Rico’s recent podcasts (they advertise on Ricochet): Casper, a fascinating start-up with over 100 employees angling to revolutionize (disrupt) everything sleep. Since […]

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The “Evil” Koch Brothers

 

The New York Times:

More than a thousand miles from the labor tumult in Wisconsin — where his name shows up on the signs of protesters and a liberal blogger impersonating him got through to the governor on the phone and said “gotta crush that union!” — the real David H. Koch was greeted rather more warmly here Friday when he officially opened a new cancer research institute bearing his name.

The Agony and the Ecstasy: Of Cartoons and Advertising

 

My younger generation might not know symphonies and concertos by name, but we recognize many melodies. Relatively few of us have attended classical performances — and fewer still seek them out — but we have at least a passing knowledge of the great composers’ works, even if we never listen to the songs all the way through and know little about the composers themselves. 

How did we gain this basic familiarity with classical music?  Through TV advertisements, film soundtracks, and (like Baby Boomers) through Looney Tunes.  The latest generation is learning these songs through video games like Peggle.  

What Will Campaign Ads Look Like in 2016?

 

Everyone knows that in 2012 the Obama campaign trounced the Romney campaign in use of technology to get out the word and get out the vote. Both with social media and in-house tools (Obama’s geek squad v. Romney’s ill-fated ORCA) the GOP’s efforts were laughable.




But there was also traditional TV advertising. 2012 brought record output in this medium, with almost $2 billion spent and 3 million ads aired, according to NPR. However, not everyone was subjected to the same levels of exposure. Niche markets/demographic and key regions were the major recipients. For instance, Obama outspent Romney 12-1 in Spanish language ads, and residents of places like Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Florida saw nothing but candidates during ad-time for 6 months.