Tag: absurdity

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Absurdities and Atrocities

 

“Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.” – Voltaire

We can see an illustration of this quote in the behavior of certain politicians over the last month. The idea that preventing people from buying seeds or child seats can somehow prevent the spread of a disease is absurd, as is the belief that people sitting in their automobiles at a church parking lot are somehow at more risk of spreading disease than those sitting in their cars eating a meal ordered at a Sonic.

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I thought I heard it all. I thought this was a joke until I saw it came from Fox News. Here’s the headline: Indian man to sue his parents for giving birth to him ‘without his consent’, wants to be paid for his life Here’s his manifesto: Read More View Post

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Each day, I begin my morning by silencing my phone’s alarm and scrolling through BBC headlines — arguably an act of supreme masochism. Each day, then, I’m treated to a panoramic view of mankind’s ever-shrinking intuition. Each day, I witness yet more proof of the slow death of common sense. Such articles often remind me […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Thoughts on Tiamat this Electoral Eve

 

The maples, wicks of autumn, go to cinder from the top down, the blaze on most trees past its prime, now mostly scattered at our feet. The plant kingdom burns brightly as it plunges into wintry darkness. A plunge into some outcome or another awaits us tomorrow, too. We can estimate what it might be – and we should. But as Ricochet Member @rodin reminds us, “none of us will ever know (or at least [not] for a long long time) whether the way we cast our ballot was better than the alternative.”

All this fall, I’ve had an unknown greater than the outcome of this election hanging over my head – or at least greater to me. One reason it’s greater is that I’m more responsible for it. However I vote, whatever I say, the outcome of this election is largely out of my hands. This other thing, though, is very much in my hands, or it’s supposed to be, and so the moral weight I bear for its unknown nature is far greater than the weight I bear for my vote.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Oct 25 Fear: Unstory – the Greatest Horror Story of them All

 

A man briefly leaves his pregnant wife to fly to his dying mother, a mother who endured one last round of chemo not in any hope of remission, but merely to eke out a few more months in order to see her grandchild born. His mother dies two hours before he arrives. He stays for her funeral, missing his own child’s birth by a few hours, too. A youngster complaining of “arthritis” is dismissed because his range of motion is large, not small. His complaint thus “disproven”, he gets on with life, or tries to. Decades later, body gratuitously dilapidated and his stoicism rendered meaningless, he learns his flexibility was the one objective clue that, if heeded, could have prevented a world of hurt – even kept him off disability – but now it’s too late. Albert Camus dies in a car crash – with a train ticket in his pocket: he was supposed to take the train, but his publisher persuaded him at the last minute to go by car instead. His death, while fittingly comedic for an absurdist, existentialist Frenchman, is not “meaningful” otherwise – it’s only distinguished by its contingency, by how easily it might not have happened.

Suffering needn’t be particularly intense to seem intensely meaningless. Even suffering that’s just big enough to be unsafe to ignore, but still too “small” to explain, may qualify. There are many forms of suffering that hurt the body, but it is suffering without a story that hurts the soul. And that’s where the story of Job comes in, because Job’s story is the unstory – the story that happens when there is no story. Job’s story is that nothing – not even God – takes away life’s absurdity – life’s refusal to fit our narratives. Perhaps it’s even God’s greater story that makes absurdity possible.

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No, I’m not talking about period panties, or thongs declaring, “I heart my sugar daddy.” I’m talking about underwear with stupid political slogans. It’s more common than you might think. Particularly feminist “consent” slogans, such as “only yes means yes”, which I suppose are well-intentioned, but… Read More View Post

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