Tag: Abraham Lincoln

Fox News’s Brian Kilmeade joins Emily Jashinsky to discuss the little-known story of how two American heroes put their differences aside for the sake of democracy and friendship. The historical context found in Kilmeade’s new book, “The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America’s Soul,” sheds new light on today’s complex discussion of politics and race.

This week on “The Learning Curve,” co-hosts Gerard Robinson and Cara Candal talk with David Reynolds, a Distinguished Professor of English and History at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of Abe: Abraham Lincoln in His Times, selected as one of the Top Ten Books of the Year by The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post. Professor Reynolds shares what teachers and students alike should know about the culture of Civil War America, primary education in that era, and the wide variety of influences on Lincoln’s thinking and leadership. They delve into the most bitterly contentious political topics of Lincoln’s time, including slavery, states’ rights, trade tariffs, and women’s rights, and how the 16th president addressed the nation’s many political divisions. They also explore how Lincoln used his rustic image to shape his public persona and appeal to voters; and how he marshaled his rhetorical talent, invoking biblical language and the ideals of the American founding, to win the war, preserve the Union, and ultimately abolish slavery. Professor Reynolds concludes with a reading from his biography.

Stories of the WeekWashington Post columnist Jay Mathews recognizes the work of Will Fitzhugh, founder of The Concord Review, to encourage students’ interest in historical fiction and reward long-form research and writing. A new project of the Teagle Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities promises to restore the humanities in undergraduate education.

Woke, or “Wide Awake?”

 

“History doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.” Mark Twain

For a few cynical wags and critics, Ben Domenech is best known as former “The View” co-host Meghan McCain’s husband. But that is unfair. The soft-spoken, cerebral, and calm Domenech is a celebrated writer and editor in his own right, and as of late, an occasional weekly host on Fox News “Primetime,” including this past week.

Domenech’s day job is serving as publisher of a popular and highly-respected libertarian-conservative website, TheFederalist.com, which features a stable of outstanding fellow journalists, including the estimable Mollie Hemingway. He also authors his own daily newsletter, The Transom, to which I subscribe for the bargain price of $30 annually. He publishes almost every day; it is part of my morning routine.

Did a Burning Bridge Change History?

 

In just a few days, we will celebrate, or at least honor, two remarkably significant events of American history. They both occurred in Pennsylvania, one obviously in 1776, the other in 1863. But a third one – also in the Keystone State, also in 1863 – deserves some recognition today (June 28th), its anniversary.

The first and most obvious is American Independence Day, July 4th, celebrating our Declaration of Independence from Great Britain and its “Mad King,” George III. The second would occur just 87 years later on a battlefield at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

QotD: Thanksgiving

 

I first read today’s quote in a fourth grade classroom seated next to a girl who claimed descent from George Washington. I suspected the claim at the time because George Washington had no biological children, but President Washington effectively adopted two of Martha Washington’s children, so, maybe. The Civil War was over two years old and the ravaged nation could see no end in sight. The proclamation below managed to acknowledge the ongoing ordeal while placing it in the context of Providence.

Washington, D.C.
October 3, 1863

The Great Task Remaining Before Us

 

Abraham Lincoln delivering the Gettysburg Address at the dedication ceremonies at the Soldiers’ National cemetery. Nov. 19, 1863. 20th century print with modern color. Shutterstock.com

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

Authority vs. Power: Leaving the Lincolnian Neverland

 

This morning a good friend sent me an article from The Imaginative Conservative (easily one of the best “blogs”) that outlined Robert Nisbet’s ten conditions of revolution. The piece is excellent and very worth reading in its entirety.

I’m not going to comment on all of the conditions, or even discuss revolution really, but what stuck out to me was Nisbet’s famous distinction between power and authority.

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Josh Hammer and Garrett Snedeker argue that it’s time for conservatives to adopt a more confrontational attitude toward rogue decisions of the Supreme Court. In Newsweek, they write:  A case as wrongly decided as Bostock would, in an earlier era, have immediately triggered the equivalent of constitutional “antibodies.” Congress would bring forth bills to limit the scope […]

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Jack brings back veteran young American — no, this is not a paradox — Nic Rowan, now at the Washington Examiner, to discuss the controversy over Washington, D.C.’s Emancipation Memorial.

Opening and closing samples “A More Perfect Union” by Titus Andronicus.

It’s Not About Lincoln or a Statue, It’s About the Constitution

 

The leftist mob of entitled Vandals, and the would be vanguard of the proletariate, are not angered by Abraham Lincoln’s human imperfections, nor by a statue of him and a black slave seeking freedom. What infuriates the radical leftist Eleanor Holmes Norton is the full expression, the defense of Lincoln and America, by Frederick Douglass, and the vote with their dollars of many freedmen and women, who commissioned and paid for the statue she and her Marxist comrades despise. She lies by half-truth, asserting that Frederick Douglass disapproved of Lincoln and the statue in his speech at its dedication. Read the truth for yourself below.

Eleanor Holmes Norton is the unaccountable beneficiary of bipartisan Congressional largesse in the made up position of non-voting delegate in the House of Representatives, where she styles herself a congresswoman. Her life-long mission is to bring about permanent one party rule by the left through rigging our electoral system by District of Columbia statehood, with its attendant two senators. She can read the whole of Frederick Douglass’s thoughts, as can all the real members of Congress and the party stenographers posing as journalists. Doing so, sadly, just stokes leftist rage, as the words and thoughts are against perpetuating grievance and division, tools necessary to leftist victory and dictatorship.

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Ace of Spades links to a recent article at the Federalist by David Marcus, in which he notes of conservatives who have offered little resistance to the toppling of certain statues: [A]fter you write your little op-ed about how of course the evil Confederate statues have to come down, they still think you’re a racist. […]

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A thought came to me the other night. While not on the Lincoln was a tyrant bandwagon, I don’t reflexively think he’s one of the greatest Presidents anymore either. For one, I used to think he was justified in suspending habeas corpus, it’s in the Constitution. Then someone pointed out that it’s in Article I, […]

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Ricochet’s own Granny Dude offered the invocation at our annual Cumberland County (Maine) Lincoln Day Dinner this evening. We couldn’t miss the opportunity to grab a photo opp with Honest Abe himself. She done him (and the great State of Maine) proud! Ricochetti are representin’ for our 16th President, the Great Emancipator! Preview Open

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Quote of the Day: The Gettysburg Address

 

Image result for the gettysburg address image“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” — President Abraham Lincoln, Nov. 19, 1863

Since Lincoln’s delivery 156 years ago, the Gettysburg Address has been parsed and analyzed for its meaning and importance.* I don’t intend to offer my own analysis, but rather to commemorate Lincoln’s eloquence on that day. This post’s title is referring to recent Ricochet posts with the title “Fewer Words” because I think Lincoln’s speech is one of the best examples of how brevity can improve communication.

On this aspect of the Gettysburg Address, I offer the following bonus quote:

Deep Dive on the Declaration of Independence and Its Relevance Today

 

In honor of Independence Day, for this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast I take a deep dive into the Declaration of Independence, discussing:

  • Its unique place in human history and the cause of freedom
  • The link between natural law and natural rights, faith and freedom
  • The Founders’ emphasis on virtue and morality to sustain a free system of limited government
  • Parallels between the charges laid out against King George III in the Declaration and modern America from the administrative state to sanctuary cities
  • The Founders’ views on slavery, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and failing to live up to the values and principles of the Declaration
  • The imperative to defend liberty against tyranny
  • And much more

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found or download the episode directly here.

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A few days ago, I went to see a one-man portrayal of Abraham Lincoln by John W. King at the Ohio County Public Library in Wheeling, WV. I found the presentation fascinating for its insights into Lincoln the man. Much of it covered his younger days. If the portrayal is to be accepted as accurate, […]

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“There was an old woman in Illinois who missed some of her chickens, and couldn’t imagine what had become of them. Someone suggested that they had been carried off by a skunk; so she told her husband he must sit up that night and shoot the ‘critter.’ The old man sat up all night, and […]

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