Tag: Abraham Lincoln

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Ricochet’s own Granny Dude offered the invocation at our annual Cumberland County (Maine) Lincoln Day Dinner this evening. We couldn’t miss the opportunity to grab a photo opp with Honest Abe himself. She done him (and the great State of Maine) proud! Ricochetti are representin’ for our 16th President, the Great Emancipator! More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Gettysburg Address

 

Image result for the gettysburg address image“Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.” — President Abraham Lincoln, Nov. 19, 1863

Since Lincoln’s delivery 156 years ago, the Gettysburg Address has been parsed and analyzed for its meaning and importance.* I don’t intend to offer my own analysis, but rather to commemorate Lincoln’s eloquence on that day. This post’s title is referring to recent Ricochet posts with the title “Fewer Words” because I think Lincoln’s speech is one of the best examples of how brevity can improve communication.

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There was a preacher who spoke for two hours. And there was this. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Deep Dive on the Declaration of Independence and Its Relevance Today

 

In honor of Independence Day, for this week’s Big Ideas with Ben Weingarten podcast I take a deep dive into the Declaration of Independence, discussing:

  • Its unique place in human history and the cause of freedom
  • The link between natural law and natural rights, faith and freedom
  • The Founders’ emphasis on virtue and morality to sustain a free system of limited government
  • Parallels between the charges laid out against King George III in the Declaration and modern America from the administrative state to sanctuary cities
  • The Founders’ views on slavery, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass and failing to live up to the values and principles of the Declaration
  • The imperative to defend liberty against tyranny
  • And much more

You can find the episode on iTunes, everywhere else podcasts are found or download the episode directly here.

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A few days ago, I went to see a one-man portrayal of Abraham Lincoln by John W. King at the Ohio County Public Library in Wheeling, WV. I found the presentation fascinating for its insights into Lincoln the man. Much of it covered his younger days. If the portrayal is to be accepted as accurate, […]

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“There was an old woman in Illinois who missed some of her chickens, and couldn’t imagine what had become of them. Someone suggested that they had been carried off by a skunk; so she told her husband he must sit up that night and shoot the ‘critter.’ The old man sat up all night, and […]

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@Jasonrudert posits in @ctlaw’s post that what we’ll really find in the Kennedy Assassination files is the secret to why Lincoln was shot: Lincoln’s mythical and famous 200 mpg carburetor, something GM, Ford, and Chrysler have been rumored to have buried decades before. Look, I unearthed those plans years ago (they were buried under a […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Bring Back the Cherry Tree

 

Today is President’s Day. In the wake of November’s election, the nation’s capital is busting apart at the seams as both parties strive for dominance and relevance. Each party wants to show that it has heard the will of the people.

If Congress wants to do something really important, it could do worse than bring back Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthdays as national holidays.

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I have been thinking on political violence today; this is the 155th anniversary of the Inaugural Address by which Lincoln tried to prevent the worst kind of political violence, civil war. I will say a few words on prudence in politics as I believe it needs to be learned again, as a concerned foreigner & […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Never Trump

 

lincoln-reagan-trumpOn the eve of Super Tuesday, Republicans face a grave decision: Are we the party of Lincoln and of Reagan, or are we the Party of Donald Trump?

I came of age during the Reagan Revolution. One of my earliest political memories was watching his speech at the 1976 Republican National Convention — one of millions of little kids hungry for optimism and a winsome smile in that unrelentingly bleak era. I didn’t reach voting age until after his re-election, but in high school, Reagan’s ideas inspired me to start reading National Review, argue individual freedom with my liberal civics teacher, and even join the US Navy.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Abe Lincoln 2016

 

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 08.57.00May I recommend two books? Harold Holzer’s Lincoln at Cooper Union and Lewis E. Lehrman’s Lincoln at Peoria are wonderful treatments of wonderful speeches. The authors present Lincoln’s moral genius and rhetorical power in the context of the critical issue — the extension of slavery — and the era’s state and national party politics.

Of the two eponymous speeches, I especially like Peoria. Lincoln gave this speech as he shadowed Stephen Douglas on the hustings in Illinois. Douglas was addressing voters in support of the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which opened the west for the extension of slavery.

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Better Living Through Coercion

 

389px-Abraham_Lincoln_November_1863Prior to the Civil War, apologists for the South’s “peculiar institution” concocted “positive good” rationales that claimed slavery was beneficial. Though the arguments varied, they were broadly based on assumptions of white superiority: intellectual, spiritual, and civilizational. The “superior” white man had the right to live off the labors of the “backward” African because doing so freed him to engage in the higher pursuits afforded by his loftier intellect, morality, and civilization.

Abraham Lincoln’s rejoinder — made during his debates with Stephen Douglas — was that the Southerners’ arguments could equally justify their own slavery by their supposed betters. Islamists, for example, believe their religion, morals, and culture are infinitely better than ours and so it is their religious duty to conquer the West and bring it under Sharia Law. Those refusing to convert to Islam are to be subjected to death, slavery or — at best — to the partial slavery of dhimmitude, which entails limited rights, obligatory humiliation, and special taxes to help enhance the lifestyles of the faithful.

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Gun-huggers already vote Republican. Brandishing an M16 shows you don’t know how to appeal to moderates. The height-extending headwear might help the Jindals of this world; for a lanky hick like you, not so much. More

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. The Greatest Presidential Speech Ever Delivered

 

abraham-lincoln-secondinauguration3Presidential speechwriters are a competitive bunch. I don’t know how many of us there have been since Warring Harding hired Judson Welliver as a “literary clerk” in the early ’20s, but I do know that the majority of those who’ve labored over a draft in the EEOB — or, if they were truly lucky, the West Wing — have a little bit of an inferiority complex.

Why? Because the first question you get when your vocation is mentioned to a stranger is “Did you write anything I know?” Put aside the banality of the question for a minute — how the hell am I supposed to have a vise-like grip on what you know? — and think about how this actually plays out. For the vast majority of us, the answer is ‘no.’ Most presidential speeches — especially in an age when they’ve become ubiquitous — are unremarkable affairs. No one reads your Rose Garden remarks congratulating science fair winners from around the country (yes, I actually got that assignment once. John Negroponte said he loved the speech. I’m still convinced he was mocking me). As a result, your average White House scribe lives in perpetual envy of Raymond Moley, who penned the 1933 FDR inaugural address that included “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself” (though Moley doesn’t seem to have been responsible for that line); of Ted Sorensen for working on JFK’s 1961 inaugural; and, yes, of Peter Robinson for writing Ronald Reagan’s Brandenburg Gate speech and etching the phrase “tear down this wall” into history. Only the lucky few get a signature song.

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President Obama, boasting that he would flout the Constitution by circumventing the will of Congress, once boasted that he had “a pen and a phone.” I just watched a very interesting movie, “Saving Lincoln,” which I received aa year ago after giving the film makers $25 on kickstarter.com. What can I say, I am sucker […]

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These are strange times, for sure, and it’s hard to define them in words with any degree of precision. When someone else does, it stands out to me. I’ve just read the following from Peggy Noonan in the WSJ this morning regarding the curious disconnect between reality and our current executive. I wonder how deeply […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Not a Good Week for Hillary Clinton

 

HillFirst, there was this. Then, there was the fact that Diane Sawyer of all people laid into Clinton over Benghazi (which, lest you forget, is not a scandal, so don’t worry your pretty little heads about it, darlings). And then, there is the fact that her book . . . well . . . isn’t so good:

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton’s new memoir “Hard Choices” officially launches Tuesday morning, but it’s already being savaged by critics for being overly cautious and, as a result, uninteresting.

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