Tag: 5G

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The latest so-called cyber hit landed on one of the U.S.’s biggest meat suppliers, JBL, today.   “The world’s largest meat processing company has resumed most production after a weekend cyberattack, but experts say the vulnerabilities exposed by this attack and others are far from resolved. Preview Open

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Portland is in election season, Mayor Ted Wheeler, who was just clocked by a bottle thrown by peaceful protesters (by his own description) is campaigning against Sarah Iannarone, who styles herself Mayor Antifa. Good government is not on the ballot this season. 55 days into unchecked rioting under his watch, I became curious as to […]

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…this stands out as exceptionally insane.  In the UK, apparently, there is a theory (propagated by various ‘celebrities’) that 5G causes coronavirus: and there have been arson attacks against cell towers and also calls for attacks on telecom installers and engineers.  See also this NPR report and this piece from Forbes. I’m reminded of some […]

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Nixing Huawei

 

The Trump administration has announced that it will move to prevent federal tax money already earmarked for rural 5G high-speed wireless services from being spent on equipment from the Chinese company Huawei.

I advocate free trade, and see trade restrictions as a tool that should be used sparingly, deliberately, and as briefly as practical.

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“5G radiofrequency (RF) radiation uses a ‘cocktail’ of three types of radiation, ranging from relatively low-energy radio waves, microwave radiation with far more energy, and millimeter waves with vastly more energy … The extremely high frequencies in 5G are where the biggest danger lies. While 4G frequencies go as high as 6 GHz, 5G exposes […]

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Judge Koh Is No 5G Wiz

 

Judge Lucy Koh of the Northern District of California gave the Federal Trade Commission an enormous victory this past week in its antitrust lawsuit against Qualcomm. Her conclusion was that “Qualcomm’s licensing practices have strangled competition” in key markets to the detriment of rivals, original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), and consumers.

Her solution was a stern edict that at a minimum forces Qualcomm to abandon its “no-license, no chip” policy in three key ways. First, as that label suggests, Qualcomm may no longer sell its chips only to parties who have already obtained a license—perfectly proper under patent law—to use chips that contain Qualcomm’s patented technology. Second, Qualcomm must renegotiate all of its contracts worldwide to make sure that it only charges “fair and reasonable rates” for all of its technology and chipsets, including now required sales to its direct competitors in the 5G market. Third, the order prohibits Qualcomm from entering into “any express or de facto exclusive dealing relationships” with its customers. As the Wall Street Journal wrote, Judge Koh’s “Qualcomm coup” effectively “kneecaps” the major American player in the 5G market.

I have worked as a legal advisor and consultant for Qualcomm for many years, and have always been stunned by the huge number of antitrust attacks that are raised against the company solely because it is an industry leader in both the United States and world markets. Treating this issue as a basic matter of patent law, a “pioneer patent”—that is, one that goes to a company that made a major advance in patented technology—has always received the broadest interpretation, and, through that protection, the largest financial rewards. The social judgment here is clear: consumers are far better off paying high royalties for a new product that they desperately want than they are paying no royalties on a product that they cannot obtain.

A Deregulation Plan for Speeding 5G Deployment

 

Democrats love talking about infrastructure investment/spending, while Republicans tout deregulation. But what do those policies look like in the modern economy? Are we just talking about repairing roads and bridges? Does regulatory reform involve more than just peeling back parts of Dodd Frank and opening more areas for drilling?

One economic goal that involves both infrastructure and deregulation is increasing broadband speed and reach while also expanding choice for consumers who currently may have little to none. That’s where 5G, the next generation wireless system, comes in. Widespread deployment of these systems will not only increase the capabilities of mobile communication — creating an alternative to fixed broadband — but also boost technologies such as autonomous vehicles, the internet of things, and virtual reality applications. So we are talking digital infrastructure here, which like all infrastructure faces regulatory hurdles.

Which is where the Federal Communications Commission comes in. FCC Commissioner Brendan Carr just released a deregulation plan to boost 5G deployment, and it sounds pretty interesting: