Tag: 2nd amendment

‘Where’s All the Ammo?’ a Former Liberal Asks

 

I’m a local property manager and I ran into my maintenance guy John, at a client’s house. We “had a discussion.” We chatted about the election, the weather, the large influx of new residents to our state, etc. He is a retired AT&T Exec and I met him working in real estate with his wife. She and I share the same birthday. His retired side job is fixing anything that’s broken and he does it well.

Back to our brief chat – he mentioned that he had to go across the bridge for a couple of supplies and stopped into the “ammo store”. John is a veteran and owning a gun or two is not unusual. So he told me there’s no ammo – everyone’s out. The place he popped into said they’ve been sold out for weeks and no supply available. He was told that Walmart is sold out, as well as the big chain Bass Pro Shop.

Member Post

 

The Second Amendment guarantees American citizens the right to bear arms, but both federal and state governments determine how citizens may legally exercise that right. And while both federal and state gun control laws regularly change, laws at the state level change more frequently and often without the media coverage that surrounds changes at the federal level. […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

It’s no secret that mainstream press coverage of gun ownership in the United States tends to be in favor of gun control. Journalists focus on how many people are killed by guns, how many children get their hands on improperly stored firearms, and how many deranged individuals go on shooting sprees. This anti-gun news bias is […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Gun Background Checks: How the State Came to Decide Who Can and Cannot Buy a Firearm

 

Prior to 1968, most adults in the United States could purchase a firearm without state interference. Guns were available in local retail stores, as well as mail-order catalogs, and as long as you hadn’t been convicted of a felony and you had the funds, there weren’t any questions asked.

Things are different now. Depending on where in America you are and what type of gun you want to buy, there’s a good chance you’ll need to pass a NICS-mandated background check to complete your purchase.

Although many people hold a strong opinion for and against gun background checks, they’ve proven to be an integral part of the state’s gun control apparatus – and they don’t appear to be leaving anytime soon.

Member Post

 

President Trump might not be a typical Republican, but he is making the same mistake Republicans always make. It’s true that Democrats are baiting federal officers to shoot violent insurgents. But all Republicans should know after a lifetime of experience that Democrats attack with slanderous narratives regardless of the facts.  Whether or not federal officers […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Member Post

 

Is his ‘state of emergency’ more real than when the President declared one at the border?  Or is he trying to manufacture one, in hopes he will be justified in calling out the Guard?  How will he enforce his ‘no weapons of any kind’?  Metal detectors, body searches?  Cries of racism will be ringing out, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Quote of the Day: Always Have Plan 2A

 
“(I) don’t get mad at ’em, don’t hate on ’em. Man, it’s not that serious. The First Amendment is first for a reason. Second Amendment is just in case the First one doesn’t work out.” Dave Chappelle

I don’t think I have heard a more pithy description the first two amendments to the Constitution than this. Freedom of speech, religion, and association needs a backstop, which the right of self-defense with arms covers. Witness the brave people of Hong Kong, facing a police state with umbrellas. It is harder to enslave a nation willing to defend itself.

It reminds me of another quote on the interplay of the Bill of Rights:

So, Who Am I Boycotting This Week?

 

In the spirit of lively debate, and because what started out as a comment that went on way too long, this is a rebuttal to @cliffordbrown ‘s post, in which he calls for a boycott of Walmart over their announced policy of discontinuing sales of pistol ammunition. I personally require no convincing to not shop at Wally World. I dislike the stores for a wide variety of reasons too long to enumerate here, and I’m not about to start shopping there except in case of immediate need.

So far so good, but let’s be honest, Wally World ain’t losing any money on my account so far because they ain’t getting it in the first place. And I imagine I’m hardly alone in my lack of effect on Sam Walton’s legacy — unless you live in one of the more rural towns where Walmart is the only general-goods game around, you’re not going to be shopping there unless you either need to, unless you like Walmart. But here is where I significantly part ways with Clifford: In his words:

Member Post

 

In light of the recent tragedies that both involved weapons that caused the deaths of dozens in a matter of minutes, it occurred to me that the gun argument falls flat for this reason: The law-abiding citizen who passed the background check, has a carry license and is shopping for shampoo and cat food will […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

Banding Together, As Brothers

 
Gator Farms Tactical

Photo by Cory Board

Americans are constantly bombarded by the statistics “gun violence” here in our country, but what’s missing from the conversation is what those numbers really represent. The vast majority of deaths involving guns aren’t due to violent crime or school shootings or accidental discharges, the problem is suicide, and it’s a very big problem indeed.

Since 2008, the rate of gun suicides has risen 22 percent and is driving the increase in gun-related deaths. (Suicides make up almost two-thirds of all gun-related deaths.) Among children and teens in particular, the gun-suicide rate is up more than 76 percent. Although only a small percentage of suicide attempts are made with a firearm, more than half of all suicide deaths are carried out with one. The primary victims are older white men.

Why Conceal Weapons?

 

Despite not carrying a gun, I’m a 2nd Amendment extremist, which is to say I respect the US Constitution as written.

It says “the right to keep and bear Arms” — not the right to bear only “firearms,” nor only the right to “keep” arms in the home. The Constitution’s authors clearly meant the public carrying of weapons, as evidenced by plain language and history.

Saving Our Gun Rights Means Saving People From Suicide

 

We’ve known for years now that the problem with gun deaths in America isn’t street gangs and other criminals, it’s the thousands of people who commit suicide with a firearm each year. This horror is affecting men (especially men who live in small, rural towns) to a much greater extent than it is women. But rather than reach out to men and channel their feelings of frustration and impotence into more positive, traditional ways, the American Psychological Association says the real problem is they’re acting like men. 

“Traditional masculinity ideology has been shown to limit males’ psychological development, constrain their behavior, result in gender role strain and gender role conflict and negatively influence mental health and physical health... Researchers led by James Mahalik, PhD, of Boston College, found that the more men conformed to masculine norms, the more likely they were to consider as normal risky health behaviors such as heavy drinking, using tobacco and avoiding vegetables, and to engage in these risky behaviors themselves.”

Collateral Damage in the Culture War

 

There is an air of incivility in American society today: A simple elevator ride can turn in a lecture on social justicean editor of Think Progress is calling for people to “confront Republicans where they eat, where they sleep and where they work” and simply wearing a hat in a restaurant can touch off a violent attack.

Which got me thinking: What would I do if I were in a restaurant and a politically-based fight broke out as I was eating? Would I get involved if, say, a political argument broke out and it degenerated into fisticuffs? Would my reaction be different if I was by myself, or if it happened when I was with my family? What would I do if the fistfight turned even more violent and lethal force was clearly about to be used? Would I use lethal force in that situation? How far would I be willing to go to defend not only my life but my ideals as well?

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are pleasantly stunned to see the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals uphold the right to carry a firearm in public. They also roll their eyes as New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker suggests supporting Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh makes one “complicit in evil.” And they slam President Trump for extending $12 billion in agricultural welfare to farmers who are getting hammered in Trump’s trade war.

Member Post

 

“A Quiet Place” is a post-apocalyptic horror/thriller movie about a family trying to survive from monsters that hunt by sound. The characters do not talk very much, but their actions speak volumes about family. It is one of those rare movies that has a nuclear family and shows the value of family and sacrifice. Major […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Get your first month free.

I Believe the U.S. Is a Wonderful Place — and I Grew Up Overseas

 

I recently came across a piece in the Huffington Post written by Liz Lemarchand, titled Why I Left The U.S. 20 Years Ago… And Why I Won’t Be Coming Back. Liz worked 60 hours a week for a corporation in DC, yet was unsatisfied with the “American Dream” and decided to move to a different country to find happiness. On the surface, this would seem like another story of someone “finding herself.” But instead of keeping it personal, Liz decides to attack American ideals. Let’s take a look at her accusations:

At 23, I was already living the corporate rat race, working nearly 60 hours a week for a huge multinational conglomerate in Washington, D.C., and I felt too young for the lifestyle I was leading. In the course of my two years there, Washington had turned me from a naive political science graduate with aspirations of single-handedly changing a failing political system into a jaded, disenchanted old lady.

The Futility Of An “Assault Weapons Ban,” In One Photo

 

One is not an assault weaponHere is a photo of three AR-15 rifles owned by my friend Tamara, the Handgun Editor at Shooting Illustrated. Two of them would be considered “Assault Weapons” under the terms of the 1994 Assault Weapons Ban, one is fully compliant and not considered to be an “assault weapon.”

Which is which, and why?

This is the problem with trying to make a law about things we don’t like: laws require rules, and not liking the idea of an “assault weapon” in civilian hands is a feeling, not a rule. People can march in the streets and rant about the NRA all they want but, at the end of the day, when laws have to be written, they must be written around regulations, not emotions.