Tag: 2021 August Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day: Why is History Important?

 

It is beneficial that the next generation learns about the past for the same reasons that it is important that you remember your childhood.  The quintessential question of “what next!”  How will we as a society go into the future without knowledge of the past? If we don’t know what we, as Americans, are, how will we know what we will become?–Miss Peachy

The above was my 13-year-old granddaughter’s spontaneous written response to a question on a pop quiz given by her teacher on the first day of eighth-grade classes.  It was the first in-person instruction she’d attended in about 18 months.

She can’t have been entirely gruntled by the experience, as at some point during that first day, she sent her mother the following text:

Quote of the Day: Reflections on John 1

 

I’m just beginning a re-read of the book of John in my daily time with the Lord. I read the first chapter on Monday and parts of it really struck me, almost like I hadn’t read it before. I thought I’d take the opportunity to share my thoughts on a few sections! First:

This was John’s [the Baptist] testimony when the Jews from Jerusalem sent priests and Levites to ask him, “Who are you?” 

Member Post

 

 “What is REAL?” asked the Rabbit one day, when they were lying side by side near the nursery fender, before Nana came to tidy the room. “Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out-handle?” “Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. […]

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Quote of the Day: When Anarchy and Treachery Reign

 

What had happened in the great age of Greece happened again in Renaissance Italy: traditional moral restraints disappeared because they were seen to be associated with superstition; the liberation from fetters made individuals energetic and creative, producing a rare fluorescence of genius; but the anarchy and treachery which inevitably resulted from the decay of morals made Italians collectively impotent, and they fell, like the Greeks, under the domination of nations less civilized then themselves but not so destitute of social cohesion.  –Bertrand Russell

I’m not sure this is a pure reflection of American society today, but it’s pretty close and sufficiently decadent. We have seen our moral restraints being attacked and compromised, thus leading to an amorphous moral relativism. The Left tries to point to “superstition” in part for these problems, meaning religion, but religion has provided the basis and framework for leading lives that reflect the moral high ground and guide us in our decisions and relationships. Without religion, we are unable to ground ourselves in virtue and truth, and instead spend our time battling evil. Russell’s comment about the “liberation from fetters” has led to energy and creativity, in terms of technological advancements, and improvements that have led to life-saving discoveries in medicine and in other areas. But those advances without an ethical base have led us to anarchy and treachery and in destructive and immoral directions. We now live in a time where trust and cooperation are almost non-existent in this polarized environment. Morality, growth and respect can’t survive in these chaotic and hateful times.

Member Post

 

I am a part of all that I have met;Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’Gleams that untravell’d world whose margin fadesFor ever and forever when I move.How dull it is to pause, to make an end,To rust unburnish’d, not to shine in use!–Tennyson, Ulysses I don’t often think of Tennyson as eminently quotable, at […]

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Member Post

 

The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet.  You don’t have to think up something intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself–just steal borrow (with proper credit, of course) from somebody else! You can share a written or spoken passage that you’ve come across and find worthy, a quote from popular, classical, or […]

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