Tag: 2020 May Group Writing

Member Post

 

This is not about a comedian or merry personality. Nope. This is about me and my mouth. It is a small thing, a simple joy, to have professionally cleaned teeth once more. I have always been conscientious about visiting the dentist twice a year. Preventive maintenance is so much cheaper than the alternative. Then my […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Grandpa Reminisces about Homonyms He’s Crossed

 

Ever start thinking about a subject and have your brain reply to a thought with an eyeroll and, “Yes, Grandpa, you have told us about that before.” I was thinking about homonyms, never mind why, and thinking how they must be the bane of most writers’ existences. They are certainly mine.

Now, everyone who writes knows to watch for the common combinations. They’re the ones people get berated for most often on Farcebook and Twender. You know the ones: they’re/there/their and your/you’re/yore. (In days or you’re we used that word a lot.) But there are so many more homonyms that writers stumble over. It’s (ooh, another pair: its/it’s) just the way the brain works while we are composing a bit of text. Once we learn to type at a decent speed, the brain starts to go on semi-automatic. Pull the trigger by thinking of a word and the hands type it out. Or they type something like the word out. Usually it is a homophone.

Happy, Merry Birthday

 

It’s hard for me to think how to make this something grander than just a personal vignette in the life of a suburban mom. Sometimes (frequently?), my pet peeves can be quite shallow.

But I suppose everyone has one of those silly, shallow things that you swear would ruin your life if it ever happened to you, but you really don’t mean it at all. It’s those things you mildly wished wouldn’t happen, but recognize their happening really isn’t that big a deal and maybe the half-hearted animus to this event that actually happens may make for a fun story on Murphy’s Law or serendipity.

The Merry Month of May: Laughter on the World Wide Web

 

And isn’t there an awful lot of that pointless, incessant barking on the Internet? But there are some fierce sites, some magical sites, some hella informative sites (I’m immersed in one on the art and science of building beehives at the moment), and some that just make me laugh out loud. (Sometimes, I don’t think this effect is intentional.)

I always bookmark a site that cheers me up when I see it, or when someone passes a link along, and I certainly have my favorites. Perhaps I’ll mention some of them in the comments. Meanwhile, won’t you please share the sites that make you laugh, and tell us why? (Please try and keep it clean, or at least let people know what they’re in for if they follow a link-of-ill-repute.)

May Merriment: Three Slices of Happiness

 

On the way to more serious content, I ran across three very different but equally, quietly, joyful YouTube videos. Enjoy three great slices of Americana:

  •  A woman making cheeseburger pie, with camera work by her husband of many years.
  • A woman and her heavy Chevy.
  • The ice cream man and the truly diverse community he serves.

The cooking video is one of a series, shot in a couple’s kitchen. To be completely accurate, it is clearly the woman’s kitchen, and her husband is there in support and in appreciation of her cooking. How could you not like Mae Mae’s Happy Table? You will surely gain five pounds just watching, but the video is worth the weight.

Merry May Is Mary’s Month

 

Here at Toad Hall we love to celebrate in the month of May by hosting a Crowning for Our Lady. This traditional Catholic devotion involves making a crown of flowers for a statue of Mary and placing them on her head, accompanied with prayers and singing. As a child, I participated with my school. As a homeschooling mom, I’ve hosted or at least organized somewhere on the order of ten to fifteen May crownings.

Yesterday it was so beautiful, if chilly, here in New York that I called up my parents and invited them over to pray, sing and share some fellowship and lemon cake with us. 

The Merry Month of May: My First Beatles Album

 

Bach Meets the BeatlesSomehow, even as a child of the sixties, I survived to adulthood without a single Beatles album to my name.  My mother, whose musical tastes were quite eclectic, never cottoned to the Lads from Liverpool, and they didn’t “send” me much, either.  We came to the United States in October of 1963 thinking that perhaps we’d escaped the phenomenon–but, No!  They followed us here, making their first stateside appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show on February 9 of the following year.  But I never traveled hundreds of miles, or stood in line for hours or days, to buy tickets to a Beatles performance.  I never formed part of a hysterical mob of screaming young women greeting them at the airport, or at the arena or concert hall.  I never howled, or fainted, or threw my panties at the stage while watching them perform.  I never even bought one of their records, not 45, or 33 1/3, single, or long-playing, ever.

Mr. She, although growing up in earlier times, likes The Beatles, and I discovered when we took up together, that he did have a few of their albums.  “Oh, well,” I said to myself.  “Can’t win ’em all.  He’s really fond of jazz, too.  Argh.”  So our home was occasionally graced by what I considered some caterwauling, in between my playing what amused me–early twentieth-century music hall songs and ballads, eighteenth-century Scottish music, old fashioned country-and-western, some African composers, Flanders and Swann.  And Bach.  You know, the stuff every girl plays on the gramophone when she has a chance.  Still no Beatles for me.

Somewhere, after a few years of marriage, that changed.  Mr. She gave me a birthday present of… a Beatles album!  And I loved it.

Group Writing: Wait, Is This Guy Real?

 

The best sorts of parodies and fun are the ones where at first, you think it might be real. As you’re watching for awhile, a few clues start to pop up. I’m thinking about things like the show Fishing with John. Have you never seen Fishing with John? Why not? It’s time you find it and see it. In the first episode where John Lurie goes shark fishing with a friend, it’s a little odd. When I first saw it I thought, well, modern productions by modern musicians, whatever. But with each episode, it got stranger. Tom Waits sticking a live fish in his shorts, well it’s believable. But then Lurie and Willem Dafoe die in the ice fishing wilderness … or so the narrator claims. By that episode, one is already under the impression that the narrator may be unreliable.

So it also was when I first started seeing some of J. P. Sears works. Was this guy for real? Well, no, but he is really funny:

Group Writing: The Old Master

 

When we speak of parody, there is a very long history, and considering our topic for Group Writing for the month of May is all about such foolishness, I knew I could go to only one source:

The Old Master

Member Post

 

So, Staying Alive, Accidentally Merry Musical Mayhem, and now A Cagey Take on Schubert. Proof positive I have a very deep well of material of, well, some quality. I am way past disco balls and the Charmin Bears, although I would not hesitate to go back by the outhouse again. There are plenty of days […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

Your occasional musical correspondent was perambulating though the all too quiet streets of his metropolis, if a jumped up small town street may be so called. The quiet was on account of the orders from our state’s great lord Ducey. Into the silence sprang the musical muse. “What of Franz Schubert’s Unfinished Symphony in B minor, […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

There is planned, skillful comedy, including parody, and then there are instances of art gone painfully wrong, so wrong it passes from a bit embarrassing to howlingly funny. Or, at least it is mildly amusing. Your mirth milage may vary.  Start with a talented quartet from England, who came to dominate the globe musically, even […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

In which your humble correspondent breaks out the disco ball, and then things take a strange turn. The Bee Gees were an Australian trio of brothers: Barry, Robin, and Maurice Gibb. They could actually carry a tune and sing in three part harmony without computer assistance. Their signature falsetto lead was quite distinctive. One of […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.

Member Post

 

So smile for a while and let’s be jollyLove shouldn’t be so melancholyCome along and share the good times while we can — Lynn Anderson, “Rose Garden” There are two major monthly Group Writing projects. One is the Quote of the Day project, managed by @vectorman. This is the other project, in which Ricochet members […]

Join Ricochet!

This is a members-only post on Ricochet's Member Feed. Want to read it? Join Ricochet’s community of conservatives and be part of the conversation. Join Ricochet for Free.