Tag: 2020 July Group Writing

Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Group Writing: Belated, With Apologies, Doggerel, and Reflections on King Canute

 

Knut der Große cropped.jpgI promised I’d write this post much soonier,
But my life took a turn for the loonier,
I couldn’t quite get my thoughts together,
Got busy, and wasn’t helped by the weather
(Hot and parched)
But now, it’s cooler, and it rained, so hopefully you won’t think I’m just a cartoon feature.

I swear, some Google search result gave “cartoon feature” as a “near rhyme” for “loonier.” Wow. Google: Doggerel Generator Extraordinaire. Among other things.

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As it turns out I generally like poetry but don’t read it as much as I could. After reading this month’s Group Writing Posts seems the Ricochetti are well versed (see what I did there?) in poetry and why am I surprised, you all know a lot about a lot. I’ve written a little doggerel, […]

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This month, in the dog days of summer, we could all use a little relief from the heat, physical and rhetorical. Please join in, especially if you have never dipped your toe in the group writing pool! We have 6 days open! Stop by today and sign up to share a bit of verse (high-, […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Doggerel: Tools in the Toolbox

 

Colonel Brown, in formulating the Group Writing topic for this month, suggested various spurs for approaching the topic, including: “Tell us about your favorite or least favorite form of verse.” Poetic verse forms are tools. Every tool has its strengths and weaknesses. For instance, one can pound on things with a wrench, but it is better for turning nuts or bolts. One can also loosen a nut with a hammer, after a fashion, but the hammer is better as a tool to pound on things, such as nails. Poetic forms each have their uses, their strengths, and their weaknesses.

A haiku might be good for conveying an image, especially laden with a double or triple entendre or strong contrast. But it isn’t usually that good for conveying a long story. Sonnets are also great for contrasts, since a proper sonnet has a pivot or turn of thought. But being longer, it might have several images or even convey much more movement of thought and detail than a haiku could. As we look at the verse forms as tools, it is certainly possible for someone to say, “I like this one best.” But the question always lingers, “Best for what purpose?”

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When in the course of Ricochet events it becomes necessary for me to fill in days, bears awake from their disco caves. In this instance, we have an offering from Robert Frost, and another anonymous bit illustrated by Wallace Tripp. The Bear Read More View Post

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. A Day Late and a Doggerel Short: Rap and Henry VIII’s Tutor

 

I have spoken before of the fact that some “modern” developments in poetry are nothing new. For instance, rap battles are just an example of a much older practice known as “flyting” or “the dozens” or by any number of other names. Well, brothers and sisters, I am here to tell you that nothing about rap is new. As is said in Ecclesiastes, “There is nothing new under the sun.”

There is a relatively recent movie called Quartet about an elderly group of opera singers. One of the elderly gentlemen teaches a class about opera to kids. To get the kids interested and excited in opera, he first does research on what kids these days are listening to. In his lesson, he compares opera to rap and tells the youngsters that in rap, you bust a cap in a dude and shake out some rhymes, but in opera, you stick a knife in his back and sing an aria about it.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Arguing with the Other Side

 

“He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.” — Edmund Burke

We can look at Burke’s statement through the lens of our own lives. I’ve met all kinds of people who either hide from those who disagree with them, or look for people to fight with. In many ways, both attitudes can be unhelpful because their underlying goals are not productive.

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When one mentions doggerel, one name comes up more often. One man stands above the crowd. One man is a shining example of what not to do in poetry. Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the one, the only, the excruciating William Topaz McGonagall. Edinburgh Read More View Post

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Doggerel and Pony Show

 

Any time you can get dogs and ponies, of any size, into the same act, you have a winner. Wallace Tripp got that combination down in splendidly ridiculous form in his 1974 illustrated book of verse A Great Big Ugly Man Came Up and Tied His Horse to MeThe moment after this month’s theme came to mind, Tripp’s title poem came to mind, both words and illustrations.

I have enjoyed the illustrations of Maurice Sendak, and Wallace Tripp throughout the years. Both laid down striking illustrations with pen and ink, often colorized with another medium. Wallace Tripp’s “book of nonsense verse” consists of children’s nursery rhymes and nonsense verse. Each bit of doggerel is perfectly played off by a preposterous scene. Consider the title poem: