Tag: 2019 June Quote of the Day

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Amid the usual dishonest, dissembling, distracting propaganda about President Trump’s plan to address the nation from the Lincoln Memorial on Independence Day, the Washington Post let slip that another president spoke from the National Mall on the same occasion. President Truman, a Democrat, mind you, spoke from the Washington Monument on July 4, 1951! So, […]

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June started cold and rainy for most of us, but ended up hot and dry. We had another full month of Quote of the Day posts, with many making Main Feed. There are plenty of open dates available on the July Quote of the Day Signup Sheet. We make it easy to “Start a Conversation” […]

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Quote of the Day: The Enemy Gets a Vote

 

“Let us recollect that peace or war will not always be left to our option; that however moderate or unambitious we may be, we cannot count upon the moderation, or hope to extinguish the ambition of others.”

—Alexander Hamilton

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Quote of the Day: Curtis LeMay on Inter-Service Rivalry

 

“The Soviets are our adversary. Our enemy is the Navy.” — Curtis LeMay

Inter-service rivalries can be as vicious. The Navy and Air Force argue about the importance of aircraft carriers. Ground support planes such as the A-10 keep on being canceled and resuscitated because they are so effective (even though not sexy like fighter aircraft). All three services competed for dominance in space (McNamara gave it to the Air Force).

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Quote of the Day: Lessons From My Mother

 

I’ve mentioned this favorite saying of my mother’s many times before. And for the first time, when I did my due diligence and searched the Internet before I wrote this, I found it attributed to someone else: Helen Gurley Brown. Pretty sure Mum didn’t get it from her, and I’ve long wondered if it was, perhaps, a line from a radio comedy show of the ’30s or ’40s that Mum heard and remembered. I guess there’ll forever be a mystery, and an unanswered question in my mind about that.

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Quote of the Day: Bastiat on Socialism

 

“Socialism, like the ancient ideas from which it springs, confuses the distinction between government and society. As a result of this, every time we object to a thing being done by government, the socialists conclude that we object to its being done at all. We disapprove of state education. Then the socialists say that we are opposed to any education. We object to a state religion. Then the socialists say that we want no religion at all. We object to a state-enforced equality. Then they say that we are against equality. And so on, and so on. It is as if the socialists were to accuse us of not wanting persons to eat because we do not want the state to raise grain.” – Frédéric Bastiat, The Law

In addition to our member , Frédéric Bastiat is a well-known author here on Ricochet, also used by our Editor Jon Gabriel for a Quote of the Day. Like many, I wasn’t exposed to Bastiat until the last 25 years or so, after New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani introduced the “broken windows” theory of government, which led me to Bastiat’s “broken windows fallacy.” Like many brilliant writers such as Thomas Sowell and Milton Friedman, Bastiat can explain important ideas in plain language. The quote above seems so obvious, yet many on the left they continue to argue against it, saying that the right kind of Socialism hasn’t been tried yet.

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“There comes a time in the history of all bureaucracies when they must inevitably parody their own functions.” — Roger Zelazny How often do we see a bureaucracy that seems to be (as one of Robert Conquest’s laws of politics states) being controlled by a cabal of its enemies? I was a safety bureaucrat in […]

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Quote of the Day: Mucking About

 

A recent podcast from “The Mark Davis Show” quoted one of the founders of the Dallas Cowboys:

“Money is like manure. If you spread it around it does a lot of good, but if you pile it up in one place it stinks like hell.” — Clint Murchison, Jr.,
(As quoted in: Time, Volume 124, 1984, p. 96)

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Right and So Wrong

 

“By doing one wrong thing, I thought I could make everything right.”
― Scott Smith, A Simple Plan

Spoken early in the novel by the narrator, this is perhaps the best summary of the story of this book and it’s a rapid downward spiral. A Simple Plan was first published in 1993, and later was adapted as a screenplay into a film by Sam Raimi, but that film pulls some of the punches of the book.

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Reincarnation

 

Upon the news that Washington state passed a bill to allow the composting of human remains this poem came to mind:

Reincarnation, by Wally McRae

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Quote of the Day: Arrrmy Training!

 

Yesterday was the United States Army’s 244th birthday, 14 June 2019. For a brief background on how the Army came into existence, and the tie to Flag Day, also celebrated each 14th of June, see “Celebrating the Flag and the Army on June 14th.” On this occasion, consider the Army through the lenses of recruiting slogans and a song. What’s with the photograph? Wait until we get to the song.

Recruiting Slogans in the All-Volunteer Force:

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Quote of the Day: Chivalry and Civility

 

“WHEN WOMEN COMPLAIN ABOUT THE DISAPPEARANCE OF CHIVALRY, I’m prone to point out that chivalry was a system, one that imposed obligations of behavior on women and girls as well as on men. Likewise, when David Brooks complains that Edward Snowden is an unmediated man, I must note that in the civil society Brooks invokes, Presidents and other leaders were also mediated; they were not merely checked by Congress, courts, etc., but they were also checked by themselves, and a sense of what was proper that went beyond “how much can I get away with now?” Obama, too, is unmediated in that sense. That Brooks couldn’t see beyond his sharply-creased pants to notice that when it was apparent to keen observers even before the 2008 election is not to his credit. If the system of civil society has failed, it is in no small part because its guardians — notably including Brooks — have also failed.” — Prof. Glenn Reynolds, Instapundit.com Jun 11, 2013

To say that I find the norms of chivalry (battlefield conduct) and courtly behavior (behavior befitting a noble at court) persuasive is obvious – look at my name. The Paladins / Paladines of Charlemagne was the idealized role model and cautionary tale for the medieval knight, and the modern fantasy vision of the paladin appeals to a similar code of heroic ethics. Similarly, I admire the civilized norms of the past, as one of the symbols of the greatness of our civilization.

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“It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.” More

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Member Post

 

The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can share a written passage that you find interesting, or even something from a favorite movie. You can present the naked quote, or add your thoughts on how it […]

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