Tag: 2019 July Quote of the Day

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July is the time for vacations, but we had another full month of Quote of the Day posts, with many making Main Feed. There are plenty of open dates on the August Quote of the Day Signup Sheet. We make it easy to “Start a Conversation” by including tips for finding great quotes. Keep it […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: The Guns of August

 

A Frenchman goes over to watch the Japanese beat the Russians in a war that was held just before the First World War, a mere decade before the date this book is set. What did he notice in his watching? He noticed that it is generally not a good idea to charge against people with machine guns. After, when he mentioned this to other French generals they decided that he was a coward. He said that wearing a uniform that featured a bright blue coat and bright red trousers might be the equivalent of wearing a bull’s eye tied around your neck and a neon sign saying ‘shoot here’. His saying this was considered not only utterly outrageous but also an insult to French soldiers…The lesson is that you can change the technology, but people might not understand what that change will mean. – Barbra Tuchman

Barbra Tuchman’s 1962 book The Guns Of August was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and made into a 100 minute documentary film in 1965. President John F. Kennedy commanded his cabinet and principal military advisers to read the book. Some scholars think this book affected Kennedy’s approach to the October 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis. The book led the political scientist Graham Allison in 1971 to propose the Organizational Process Model instead of the traditional Game Theory and other Rational Actor approaches to conflicts. So how does the quote above and Allison’s book hold up after 50 years?

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Mark Steyn on Ted Kennedy

 

Mark Steyn’s columns always have plenty of quotable passages, but he surpassed himself with a review of the movie Chappaquiddick:

There is, as it happens, another brother – or “brother”: Kennedy cousin Joe Gargan, who lost his parents at a young age and was raised by Teddy’s parents as (almost) one of their own. As played by Ed Helms, Joe is the conscience of the picture: he doesn’t exactly do the right thing, but he’s broadly in favor of others doing the right thing, which, in the moral universe of the Kennedys, gives him a sporting chance of winding up a couple of circles of hell further out from where the rest of them are headed.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

“I think about it all the time,” Ford said of the shootings that plague his community. “That’s why I’m working with a concealed carry instructor and we’re going to go through the neighborhood and we’re going to encourage people to get their concealed carry license because it makes no sense for people not to have […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Truly Alone

 

I am alone now, truly alone, and absolutely isolated from any known life. I am it. If a count were taken, the score would be three billion plus two over on the other side of the moon, and one plus God knows what on this side. – Michael Collins

We are now celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 landing on the Moon. On Wednesday we discussed the first man on the Moon Neil Armstrong, who died in 2012. Yesterday we discussed Buzz Aldrin, who had a PhD in astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The third member of the crew, Michael Collins, orbited the Moon while Neil and Buzz landed. There were many question on his role and how he felt about not landing. Like Armstrong and Aldrin, Collins decided to stop space flights after Apollo 11:

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Two days ago I lay on the grass beside the Virginia monument on the battleground called Gettysburg. It was late in the day and the heat was finally giving way to shade and milder temperatures. My son Sam and I had spent the day walking, pointing, listening and learning. Over 1400 monuments are scattered across […]

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“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”— Antoine de Saint-Exupery Such bracing words! Life is brutally practical and goal oriented, but the first step to building anything of […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Historia Calamitatum

 

The title of this post may look like rather esoteric, bluestocking, or even erotic clickbait, but there’s nothing to that theory. It’s not a feminist take on the story of poor Peter Abelard, and no guy ends up minus an essential piece of equipment at the end of it. No. It’s just a rumination on one of the dumbest things I ever did in my life (that I’m willing to cop to, at least), and how I got past it, beyond it, and how it all turned out for the best. (It’s also, perhaps, an object lesson in heeding the warning signs, something else I’m not always very good at.)

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Propaganda

 

“Never believe all your own side’s propaganda, but don’t start believing the enemy’s.” – Unknown (heard from David Weber)

I have to apologize, as this quote is based on my recollection, which may be inexact. My apologies. That said, I heard this or something close to it at a panel on military science fiction.

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Sorry, you missed Independence Day. But you can be cool and Start a Conversation by posting a July Quote of the Day. It’s still the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet, and we’ll give you tips for finding great quotes. So don’t be a dog and sign up today! More

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Chess and Life

 

“In chess, as in life, a man is his own most dangerous opponent.” Vasily Smyslov

Vasily Smyslov was the seventh official world chess champion. Known for his positional style, he was world champion from 1957-8. He was a Christian in the staunchly atheistic Soviet Union (in private, he harshly criticized Lenin). His quote points to the need to properly evaluate your situation in chess as in life.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Lichtenberg on Truth and Satire

 

“Truth comes from the mouths of fools and children: I wish every good mind which feels an inclination for satire would reflect that the finest satirist always has something of both in him.” — Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

Lichtenberg was an eighteenth-century scientist who spent most of his life in the Holy Roman Empire. He was born in Hesse-Darmstadt. When he was about twenty-one, he was granted tuition from his local ruler to go to the nearby University of Göttingen, which was in the Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg, one of the domains of George III. (The king/elector sent several of his sons to study at the University of Göttingen.) Lichtenberg spent the rest of his life there as student and professor with the exception of a couple of trips to England (one of George III’s other domains). He is probably best remembered today due to Lichtenberg figures, traces of paths left by electricity that are named for him. These are often seen in people who have been struck by lightning, for instance.

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The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can share a written passage that you find interesting, or even something from a favorite movie. You can present the naked quote, or add your thoughts on how […]

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