Tag: 2019 December Quote of the Day

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December finished 2019 with full month of Quote of the Day posts, with many making the Main Feed. Start the New Year right by sharing your favorite quote on the Quote of the Day January Signup Sheet. We make it easy to “Start a Conversation” by including tips for finding great quotes. Keep Ricochet active […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QotD: How the years ran away…the best is yet to come

 

Yesterday when I was young
The taste of life was sweet as rain upon my tongue
I teased at life as if it were a foolish game
The way the evening breeze may tease a candle flame
The thousand dreams I dreamed, the splendid things I planned
I always built, alas, on weak and shifting sand
I lived by night and shunned the naked light of day
And only now I see how the years ran away

Charles Aznavour (1966)

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. QOTD: The Epic Story of Human Memory

 
Most of us know what we should expect to find in a dragon’s lair, but, as I said before, Eustace had read only the wrong books. They had a lot to say about exports and imports and governments and drains, but they were weak on dragons.
― C.S
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“Only twenty-seven people in Britain can explain why the day after Christmas Day is called Boxing Day, but that doesn’t stop millions from marking it by staying home from work. An intriguing side effect of thus having two consecutive public holidays is that no matter what days of the week they fall on, the British […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Goodness and Mercy

 

Don't be Chikin Fill Red KettleThe Salvation Army Mission Statement

The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Werner Heisenberg

 

“I remember discussions with Bohr which went through many hours till very late at night and ended almost in despair; and when at the end of the discussion I went alone for a walk in the neighboring park I repeated to myself again and again the question: Can nature possibly be so absurd as it seemed to us in these atomic experiments?” – Werner Heisenberg, Physics and Philosophy (1958)

In 1905, Albert Einstein argued that light behaves not only as a continuous wave but sometimes as an individual particle. This led to the development of Quantum Mechanics in the mid-1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Niels Bohr, Erwin Schrödinger, and others. Einstein questioned parts of the theory with his “God does not play dice with the universe” quote. Even 100 years later, Quantum Mechanics still troubles us with its strange phenomena.

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Today’s old saying comes courtesy of an interview with author of The Witcher novels Andrzej Sapkowski. Asked how he expects the Netflix adaptation of his stories to turn out, Sapkowski responds: “You can’t judge the soup by the groceries.” More

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: By ‘A Lady’

 

“It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.”

Thus begins the best-known work by one of English literature’s best-known authors who was born 244 years ago, on December 16, 1775. Pride and Prejudice was Jane Austen’s second published novel, one of only three that were published during her short life, which ended prematurely at the age of 41 from what was probably Hodgkin’s lymphoma combined with long-term Addison’s disease.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. The Age of the Essay

 

Around 1100, Europe at last began to catch its breath after centuries of chaos, and once they had the luxury of curiosity they rediscovered what we call “the classics.” The effect was rather as if we were visited by beings from another solar system. These earlier civilizations were so much more sophisticated that for the next several centuries the main work of European scholars, in almost every field, was to assimilate what they knew… As European scholarship gained momentum it became less and less important; by 1350 someone who wanted to learn about science could find better teachers than Aristotle in his own era. But schools change slower than scholarship. In the 19th century the study of ancient texts was still the backbone of the curriculum – Paul Graham

In this quote from The Age of the Essay, Paul Graham explains how knowledge and writing have been held back due to teaching curriculum throughout the ages. First came the Medieval scholars, who then congregated into the universities to study the Arts, Theology, Law, and Medicine. Graham considers these universities were more like law schools, where you spent 1/3 of your time in Rhetoric, and were required to know both sides of the argument. To finish your education, you submitted a thesis on an idea and the dissertation was the argument by which you defended it. In addition, the importance of learning Greek, Latin, and classical writings was the essence of the British Public School (for the elites) until relatively recently.

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(I joined Ricochet many years ago with the intent to post on a series of my favorite paragraphs/passage from the real, paper books that I try to spend more time with than this cursed keyboard. I repeat, the site used to seem much more intellectually curious back then…and I’m too stubborn to let that go. […]

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I first read Sherlock Holmes stories as a youth; soon after college I read the complete collection. I have returned to them after many years, and, in the second last of the Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, I found this quote: “There is nothing in which deduction is so necessary as in religion,” said he, leaning with […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Motive Mystery

 

“We may never know his motive.” “Authorities remain uncertain as to the killer’s motive.” Et cetera.

How many times do we read this, and see a very clear, very obvious motive? Seriously, if someone kills a person (particularly soldier or religious leader) while screaming Allah Akbar, you can safely say the scumbag is an Islamic Supremacist getting his jihad on. If someone is a member of an antisemitic group and kills a bunch of Jews after going to a place known to have Jews, they probably are a member of the Hitler fan club.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Before There Was Harry and Meghan . . . There Was Edward and Wallis

 

I have found it impossible to carry the heavy burden of responsibility and to discharge my duties as King as I would wish to do without the help and support of the woman I love.

On December 10, 1936, what might be described as Britain’s “long national nightmare” came to an end when Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David, Edward VIII, By the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India, threw in the towel and bailed on both his throne and his country.

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

The future affects our understanding of the past. We live our lives toward the future, but we understand our lives only in retrospect. Only looking back can we see whether we took the right road, whether a certain decision was justified, whether our dreams were intimations or illusions. Life involves risk, which is why we […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Member Post

 

Remember when the Left was ranting about Koch Brothers cash, Halliburton, etc. buying foreign policy? Most of us dismissed it – especially since the Left seemed to ignore the windfall of cash they received from Soros and Steyer. If people wanted to support more free market government, that’s great. What if we were missing something? […]

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Groupthink

 

“If everybody is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.” — Gen. George S. Patton

Yesterday YouTube suggested that I would like The Mark Steyn Show Climate Change Forum, so I watched it. Whether it’s creepy that YouTube put this video at the top of my feed the day after I had been writing on Ricochet about climate change in general and the website of a panel member in particular, I’ll leave for others to decide. The panel discussion included a lot about how difficult it is for people to speak up or challenge the uniform thinking of their peers.

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Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Martyn Lloyd-Jones on the New Paganism

 

“Their god is something which they created themselves, a being who is always prepared to oblige and excuse them. They do not worship him with awe and respect, indeed they do not worship him at all. They reveal that their so-called god is no god at all in their talk. For they are forever saying that ‘they simply cannot believe that God will punish the unrepentant sinner to all eternity, and this and that.’ They cannot believe that God will do so, therefore, they draw the conclusion that God does not and will not. In other words, God does what they believe he ought to do or not do. What a false and blasphemous conception of God! How utterly untrue and unworthy! Such is the new paganism of today.” — Martyn Lloyd-Jones

Martyn Lloyd-Jones was a young doctor in 1920s London. His boss, Lord Horder, asked him to make a catalog of their patients. LJ soon realized that most of their clientele, the best and brightest of their time, had medical problems due to their lifestyle (ate too much, drank too much, etc.). He soon decided that people had a spiritual problem. In this advent season, it is important to look beyond the headlines of the day.

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It’s time to help keep Ricochet warm and jolly in December by starting a conversation on the Quote of the Day. There are even two open dates next week! Many Quote of the Day posts make the Main Feed, and some garner close to 100 comments. We’ll even give you tips for finding great quotes. so get that […]

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