Tag: 2018 May Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day: Richard Feynman

 

“We’ve learned from experience that the truth will come out. Other experimenters will repeat your experiment and find out whether you were wrong or right. Nature’s phenomena will agree or they’ll disagree with your theory. And, although you may gain some temporary fame and excitement, you will not gain a good reputation as a scientist if you haven’t tried to be very careful in this kind of work. And it’s this type of integrity, this kind of care not to fool yourself, that is missing to a large extent in much of the research in cargo cult science.” — Richard Feynman

Richard Feynman was a Nobel Prize-winning physicist, well known for his role on the Presidential commission investigating the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The above quote came from his 1985 book Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! and was based on his 1974 Caltech commencement address. He was a strong advocate of scientific integrity that corresponds to utter honesty — test and retest your data and eliminate any other explanations. Note his disdain above to “cargo cult” science, which plagues us today with “Climate Change” and other such theories.

While at the university contemplating a degree in physics, I learned aspects of the Feynman diagram. Later, I saw the 1989 PBS Nova special “The Last Journey of a Genius,” which showed him being a bongo-playing scientist, adventurer, safecracker, and yarn-spinner. While dying of cancer, his last request was to visit Tuva, a part of Russia, located in the middle of Asia. Tuva was best known for its colorful postage stamps and for Throat Singing. For Feynman, it was the ultimate challenge to get there during the Cold War, but he died the day before being granted permission. His daughter visited Tuva in 2009.

Quote of the Day: Alexander Hamilton and the Dangers of Dissent

 

“There are seasons in every country when noise and impudence pass current for worth; and in popular commotions especially, the clamors of interested and factious men are often mistaken for patriotism.” — Alexander Hamilton

Alexander Hamilton, one of our great Founders, intended to speak to his contemporaries about the disruption that could happen in his times. But he clearly was warning all of us about the dangers of dissent and rebellion when they disparage the values of this country.

We live in times when Progressivism has poisoned the ideas of liberty, respect for personal freedom and acceptance of free speech. The louder people protest and cry for action, drumming up fear and hate, the more attention they get. They care nothing about this country but only about power and government control. And many of us are beginning to feel helpless against the onslaught, condemning their actions but no longer knowing what to do against their agenda. These are sad and frightening times.

Quote of the Day: Elementary Justice? Or Not?

 

“Well, I am afraid I can’t help you, Lestrade,” said Holmes. “The fact is that I knew this fellow Milverton, that I considered him one of the most dangerous men in London, and that I think there are certain crimes which the law cannot touch, and which therefore, to some extent, justify private revenge. No, it’s no use arguing. I have made up my mind. My sympathies are with the criminals rather than with the victim, and I will not handle this case.” — The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton

Like many another successful author, this one was ambivalent about his relationship with his greatest creation. He found Holmes distracting and annoying, and frequently talked of “slaying” him and “winding him up for good and all.” (His one attempt to do so was, obviously not all that successful. It appeared that publishers would pay any amount for more of the great detective, and the fellow with a difficult, not very well-off life, who hadn’t succeeded at almost anything else he tried, was yoked to Sherlock Holmes for the remainder of his.)

That he seemed unable to ‘make a go’ of his life certainly can’t be laid at the door of a lack of either intelligence or sense of adventure. Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, 159 years ago today, on May 22, 1859. His father was a devout alcoholic, and the family separated a few times in Doyle’s early youth, but always came back together, living in what were in those days politely called “reduced circumstances” in Edinburgh and its environs. As with many promising young boys of the time, wealthier family members intervened, and young Arthur was sent to schools in England and Austria, winding up back in Edinburgh where he studied medicine, before becoming a doctor and launching several unsuccessful practices throughout the UK. (One wonders as to the nature of his bedside manner because retaining patients seems to have been a huge problem.) During this time he studied Botany and began writing in an effort to keep the wolf from the door, and was moderately successful at it, even then.

Member Post

 

It is a painful thingTo look at your own trouble and knowThat you yourself and no one else has made it. ― Sophocles, Ajax I ran across this quote years ago. I wrote it down. If you drop it into an interwebs search thingy it will bring up famous quote pages. And yet, when I […]

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Member Post

 

There are three points of doctrine the belief of which forms the foundation of all morality. The first is the existence of God; the second is the immortality of the human soul; and the third is a future state of rewards and punishments. Suppose it possible for a man to disbelieve either of these three […]

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Member Post

 

All right. Fine. You really want to know what I want? You really want to know the truth? I want my people to reclaim their rightful place in the galaxy. I want to see the Centauri stretch forth their hand again and command the stars. I want a rebirth of glory, a renaissance of power. […]

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Member Post

 

Man loves, men hate. While individual men and women can sustain feelings of love over a lifetime toward a parent or through decades toward a spouse, no significant group in human history has sustained an emotion that could honestly be characterized as love. Groups hate. And they hate well…Love is an introspective emotion, while hate […]

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Quote of the Day: Savoring the Enemy’s Losses

 

“Grant had captured an army of at least 13,000 men, a record of the North American continent. He showed mercy toward the conquered force, giving them food and letting them keep their side arms. Avoiding any show of celebration, he refused to shame soldiers and vetoed any ceremony in which they marched. ‘Why should we go through with vain forms and mortify and injure the spirit of brave men, who, after all, are our own countrymen,’ he asked.” — from Grant, by Ron Chernow

“If your enemy falls, do not exult; if he trips, let your heart not rejoice, lest the Lord see it and be displeased, and avert his wrath from him.” —Proverbs, 24: 17-18

For all his overindulgence with alcohol, Ulysses S. Grant was a brilliant general. Although he had some embarrassing losses, he was relentless, strategic and smart. Yet he agonized over those left dead on the battlefield, whether they were his own men or the men of the Confederate army. He was not only determined to lessen their misery, but tried to treat the wounded and dead on both sides, with dignity and compassion.

Quote of the Day: A Sweet Tooth for Song and Music

 

“I have a sweet tooth for song and music. This is my Polish sin.”

OK, so this entire post is something of a Polish joke. I can see your lip starting to curl, and your eyes rolling back in your head. “Wait!” I hear you shout. “I am offended on behalf of Poles everywhere! How can you, a high-toned, (green) card-carrying British lady, make a Polish joke without implied overtones of bigotry, cultural superiority, and aggression? Tut-tut. Isn’t this the height of colonialist and imperialist privilege? How dare you?”

I’d probably do it anyway because, you know: free speech and the right to offend. But, in any event, I do dare, and also, here are some more reasons why:

Member Post

 

The Quote of the Day is the easiest way to start a fun conversation on Ricochet. You don’t have to be intelligent, pithy, or eloquent yourself. You can bask in the wisdom of another, someone who went through the hard knocks of acquiring that wisdom, pithiness, and eloquence. Or, you can even quote your favorite movies. […]

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