Tag: 2016 Election

Hoover Institution fellow and award-winning historian Victor Davis Hanson joins the Manhattan Institute’s Troy Senik to discuss the presidency of Donald Trump and Hanson’s new book, The Case for Trump.

Hanson argues that our 45th president alone has the instinct and energy to upset the balance of American politics. “We could not survive a series of presidencies as volatile as Trump’s,” he writes, “but after decades of drift, America needs the outsider Trump to do what normal politicians would not and could not do.”

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An author, columnist and friend of mine shared an email chain with me in response to last week’s election, and specifically the GOP’s losing control of the U.S. House of Representatives. He asked a pertinent question, my response to which I’ve decided to post here (with a few minor edits). Here’s his question: “In order […]

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Contributor Post Created with Sketch. No, It Wasn’t the Russians. Democrats Have Been Losing for Years.

 

Spoiler: Trump won the 2016 elections and it had nothing to do with the Russians.

President Trump won the election fair and square. In truth, the big reveal in all of this is that Democrats have been losing since President Obama took office.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are amazed that more than 90 percent of House Democrats either opposed a resolution supporting Immigration and Customs Enforcement or refused to vote on it at all. They also grumble as deficit projections once again head north of a trillion dollars and the number of food stamp recipients remains stubbornly high in a strong economy. And they denounce Vladimir Putin’s proposal to allow U.S. investigators to interview the 12 Russians indicted for meddling in the 2016 elections in exchange for allowing the Russians to interview a former U.S. ambassador.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America analyze the California Democratic Party’s decision to endorse California Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s rival in the general election, Democratic state Sen. Kevin de Leon. They also criticize President Donald Trump for his inability to confront Russian president Vladimir Putin about multiple issues, especially election meddling, noting that the president seems more worried about defending his 2016 win than exposing the truth. And they laugh as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, stumbles her way through an explanation about why Israel is an occupying force on “Firing Line.” They also finally resolve the biggest question in film: “Is Die Hard a Christmas movie?”

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Rod Rosenstein announced Friday the indictments of twelve Russians for alleged interference with the 2016 presidential election. President Trump is meeting Putin today. There was nothing urgent about Rosenstein’s actions. The Russians do not reside in the US and thus are not a flight risk. His actions were clearly designed to interfere with Trump’s foreign […]

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Jim and Greg are both on vacation this week. They will be back June 25th. There will new episodes with guest hosts Thursday and Friday of this week. Today, please enjoy an encore presentation of the Three Martini Lunch.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America serve up only good martinis today, although the last one comes with a twist. They cheer Congress and President Trump for enacting “Right to Try” legislation, allowing terminally ill patients to undergo promising treatments not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. They also get a lot of enjoyment out of the excerpt from an upcoming HBO documentary that shows Obama Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes truly speechless after Donald Trump was declared the winner on Election Night 2016. And just two days after ABC fired Roseanne Barr for her horrible tweet about Valerie Jarrett, Samantha Bee puts the left on the spot after using a vile word to describe Ivanka Trump.

After venting about their run-ins with government bureaucracy, Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America dive into three crazy martinis related to the Justice Department’s Inspector General report. They marvel at the mountain of obvious political bias inside the FBI during the 2016 campaign and that the IG does not believe that bias affected the Hillary Clinton investigation. They also shudder at the lack of ethics that the media used to obtain classified information from FBI officials. And they find it really difficult to comprehend that former FBI Director James Comey didn’t know that Clinton’s former top aide Huma Abedin is married to disgraced former Rep. Anthony Weiner.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America serve up only good martinis today, although the last one comes with a twist. They cheer Congress and President Trump for enacting “Right to Try” legislation, allowing terminally ill patients to undergo promising treatments not yet approved by the Food and Drug Administration. They also get a lot of enjoyment out of the excerpt from an upcoming HBO documentary that shows Obama Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes truly speechless after Donald Trump was declared the winner on Election Night 2016. And just two days after ABC fired Roseanne Barr for her horrible tweet about Valerie Jarrett, Samantha Bee puts the left on the spot after using a vile word to describe Ivanka Trump.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Any Republican Would Have Won in 2016? It Ain’t Necessarily So.

 

Don’t bet your house on the roulette pattern — or your country on the election pattern. Correlation is not causation and past performance does not necessarily predict future results. We all know this, yet it is great fun to prognosticate and to chew the fat over past sports and presidential election seasons. Moving beyond such speculation towards serious analysis requires us to turn to the theory and practice of political science.

In Designing Social Inquiry: Scientific Inference in Qualitative Research, Gary King, Robert Keohane, and Sidney Verba laid out the case for research that is scientific even without large data sets — situations like the small set of presidential elections. Arguing against ad hoc explanations, they laid out the basics of research design: “the research question, the theory, the data, and the use of the data.” (p.13)

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I wrote this column about Paul Ryan’s retirement for USA Today, and C-SPAN was nice enough to have me on this morning to talk about it. An excerpt: Read More View Post

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America welcome the news that Scooter Libby, the chief of staff to Vice President Dick Cheney, may soon be pardoned by President Trump and have his convictions from the Valerie Plame fiasco scrubbed from the record. Jim and Greg don’t excuse Libby’s conduct in the investigation but point out there never should have been an investigation since there was no underlying crime. They also roll their eyes as excerpts from James Comey’s new book slam Trump as being shorter than expected, wearing his ties too long and using tanning goggles, while Trump tweets that Comey is an “untruthful slimeball.” And they react to Comey’s admission that he revealed the re-opening of the Hillary Clinton email probe because he was sure she would win the election anyway and might not have done so if he thought Trump could actually win.

Jim Geraghty is back! Today, he and Greg Corombos of Radio America agree that it was time for VA Secretary David Shulkin to leave after months of ethical woes – but also a year of some progress at one of government’s biggest and most important bureaucracies. They also take on the identical script recorded by dozens of anchors at Sinclair stations, noting that the commitment to reporting facts is good but making every station say exactly the same thing looks really bad. And they slam Hillary Clinton for adding the Supreme Court decisions on Citizens United and the Voting Rights Act to her endless excuses for losing in 2016.

Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. Quote of the Day: Thinking Clearly

 

“‘Beware!’ said Poirot, shaking an admonishing finger at Hastings. ‘The symmetry, it is everything. Everywhere there should be neatness and order, especially in the little grey cells of the brain.’ He tapped his head as he spoke. ‘If you would use your little grey cells and attempt to see the whole case clearly – as I attempt to do – you would perhaps perceive the truth, my friend.'” — Detective Hercule Poirot, from the novel Black Coffee.

The long, drawn-out Mueller investigation is finally revealing some rotten fruits from the tree of appeasement that was cultivated, pruned and well-watered by the last administration. History has shown that the hidden roots of such a tree grow deep and in many directions, under the covering of thick layers of dirt. Lies, deceit, suffering, loss of life and arrows to the heart of freedom are the result. Then something happens … the roots bulge and eventually burst through the dirt to the surface, revealing themselves.

What—the Patriots LOST the Super Bowl? It’s gotta be…the RUSSIANS! I want an investigation right now!

A look at the legal aspects of the ongoing Memogate vs Russiagate battle with renown legal scholar David Rivkin;

Richard Epstein responds to suggestions that the Justice Department may appoint a special prosecutor to probe corruption allegations around Hillary Clinton. Also on the docket: exactly how independent of presidential prerogative should attorneys general be? Is it time for Jeff Sessions to step aside? And are the legal suspicions around both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton evidence of a decline in America’s leadership class — or proof that, for all its flaws, the system still works?

A cast of thousands (well, several) from Bill Kristol to Monica Crowley to Caitlin Huey-Burns of Real Clear Politics contribute to a symposium on whether the Trump presidency will have the same impact on the Republican Party at the congressional/state/local level as Obama.

AKA “utter devastation.”

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As usual, Mark Steyn posted a very perceptive retrospective on the election. Ricochet’s pundits and pundit wannabes would do well to read it. Some of the money quotes are: Read More View Post

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The only number you need to know from the Republicans debacle in Virginia, and why it should terrify the GOP.

Jim Antle, Political Editor at the Washington Examiner, on the fallout of Tuesday’s GOP defeats.

It’s “Indictment Week” in Washington, and Paula Reid of CBS News updates the story.

Are conservatives surrendering the Grand Old Party to the populists without even a fight? The Weekly Standard’s Steve Hayes says “yes.”