Tag: 2016 California Senate Race

Identity Politics a Ticking Time Bomb for Democrats

 

shutterstock_56132851I’ve often thought that I probably couldn’t be a Democrat even if I held liberal policy views. The reason: it’s just too much work. The number of identity-based tripwires you have to navigate on any given day virtually assures you’re going to blow off a limb at some point. As Glenn Reynolds notes in his new USA Today column, the consequences of that trend are now playing out in the intra-Democratic fight over the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal:

Right before Obama’s trade bill cratered in the Senate last week, Obama complained that its chief Senate critic, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., didn’t understand the real world. [National Organization for Women President Terry] O’Neill then chalked Obama’s attitude up to sexism.

O’Neill told The Hill she took issue with Obama calling Warren by her first name during an interview with Yahoo News published May 9.

Sweet Loretta?

 

Congresswoman+Loretta+Sanchez+Joins+WGA+Picket+2AP6UjWqRkKlYou can’t blame Californians for being somewhat jaded, if not downright disinterested, in statewide elections. Just look at the numbers.

Jerry Brown won last year’s gubernatorial contest by 20 points without working up a sweat (or bothering to run ads). He also won by a shade under 13%, back in 2010. As for presidential contests, America’s nation-state hasn’t gone with a Republican since George H.W. Bush back in 1988. The average spread in the last five presidential years is 17 points, ranging from a 24-point Obama win in 2008 to a 10-point George W. Bush loss in 2004. Then there’s the U.S. Senate, which will be in play in 2016 with Barbara Boxer stepping down after four terms. Will a Republican take her seat? Don’t bet on it. The average GOP Senate loss in years coinciding with a presidential election — this is going back to 1992, when Boxer and Dianne Feinstein were first elected — is the same 17 points. Take out Boxer’s 5% win in 1992 and it’s over 20%.

But that doesn’t mean the Senate race won’t be fun to watch, especially when the two Democrats in the race cross paths. That would be State Attorney General Kamala Harris and Congresswoman Loretta Sanchez.