Tag: 1st Amendment

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Trump supporters who contest the 2020 election lose their 5th, 4th, and 1st Amendment rights, Constitutional liberty interests, and writ of habeus corpus  in Washington DC Courts, where the guy with the viking horns is being held without bail because he might “push false claim of election fraud” if released.   Preview Open

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Quote of the Day: Always Have Plan 2A

 
“(I) don’t get mad at ’em, don’t hate on ’em. Man, it’s not that serious. The First Amendment is first for a reason. Second Amendment is just in case the First one doesn’t work out.” Dave Chappelle

I don’t think I have heard a more pithy description the first two amendments to the Constitution than this. Freedom of speech, religion, and association needs a backstop, which the right of self-defense with arms covers. Witness the brave people of Hong Kong, facing a police state with umbrellas. It is harder to enslave a nation willing to defend itself.

It reminds me of another quote on the interplay of the Bill of Rights:

How Many Polar Bears Can Dance on the Tip of an Iceberg?

 

Photo Credit: Alan D. Wilson, October 2007, Polar Bears (Cubs), Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is acting as the face for the Justice Democrats’ Green New Deal, Dianne Feinstein is confronted by terror-stricken children and their indoctrination handlers, women in first world countries are declaring that they will forgo child-bearing in the face of impending environmental collapse, Mayor DeBlasio is mandating “Meatless Monday” menus in NYC public schools in order to combat Climate Change… Wherever you turn, the Left have whipped up their Eco-Marxist rhetoric to an absolute froth. And I, for one, have had enough.

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Swedish friends of mine have lived in the US for decades now. They are well traveled and speak to associates throughout Europe. One recently remarked that the problem of people disassociating from each other after debating politics at dinner is a uniquely American phenomenon. He said it is a tale one hears often from Europeans […]

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On Saturday, the totally organic, Democrat #Resistance, 2018 midterm, get-out-the-vote effort rallied nationwide – with fleets of third-party chartered buses carrying protesters, with protesters carrying mass-manufactured “March for our Lives” signs, and with the radical Left’s new Little Rascals entertaining the crowds with Castro-era, Cuban revolutionary outfits and snappy, full-arm extension, power-fist salutes. However, now […]

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Mass gatherings of concerned citizens are an ancient spectacle. But gatherings to attract the attention of national media are a consequence of modern communication technologies. They seem to multiply exponentially as those technologies connect us more broadly, instantly, and viscerally. Yet few seem to have a purpose other than sharing a tantrum or feeling good […]

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Bishop Robert Barron had an interesting response to Scorsese’s new movie Silence. The article contains spoilers which I will not recount here. But in it Barron submits a provocative comparison of religious loyalty with national loyalty under extreme circumstances. In the following hypothetical scenarios, consider multiple objects of devotion — loyalty to God, loyalty to nation, […]

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Justice for Freedom

 

shutterstock_121239673It’s sometimes difficult to adjudicate the the outer boundaries of freedom of expression — for what it’s worth, I prefer to stake as wide a claim as possible — but there shouldn’t be any disagreement over the protection’s core function: to ensure that citizens’ natural right to publicly and freely comment on public affairs goes unmolested. But in a recent and egregious case covered by the Cato Daily Podcast, Colorado resident Tammy Holland was hauled into civil court not once but twice for taking out a series of newspaper ads regarding Common Core and encouraging her neighbors to educate themselves on the matter and the upcoming school board election.

According to the Institute for Justice — which is representing Holland and has a full summary of her case — almost any allegation of campaign finance impropriety in Colorado automatically results in a court case without any discretion from law enforcement. As IJ puts it, this system effectively gives would-be censors the benefit of the doubt, while putting the burden of proof on speakers. It’s a monstrous and shameful inversion of how our political system is supposed to work.

In By the People, Charles Murray described the Institute for Justice as one of the models for his proposed “Madison Fund.” If you can spare a few dollars, there are few worthier recipients of your money. I just made a small donation myself.

Thanksgiving, 1789

 

If you want a clear example of how the authors of the US Constitution understood our government’s relationship to religion, look no further than the proclamation of a day of thanksgiving to God in 1789 by President George Washington. Here is his speech inaugurating this holiday (and yes, “holiday” is a derivation of “holy day”).

Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey His will, to be grateful for His benefits, and humbly to implore His protection and favor; and—Whereas both Houses of Congress have, by their joint committee, requested me “to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness:”

Garland: A Liberal’s Worst Nightmare

 

bill-of-rights-hero-lgThis past Sunday, the American Freedom Defense Initiative and its president, Pamela Geller, held a Muhammad art exhibit in a Garland, Texas community center. Two radical Islamists — Elton Simpson and Nadir Soofi — drove up to the entrance, got out of their car, and started shooting, wounding a security guard before a Garland Police officer shot and killed them both. This is a terrible story for obvious reasons. In many ways, it’s an even worse story for liberals. Here are just a few examples of why.

The First Amendment: From efforts to stifle debates and cancel “American Sniper” on college campuses, to calling “thug” the new n-word, liberals are constantly trying to shut down and/or chill free speech. Every day, more words and ideas are offensive to them and, therefore, cannot be used. Cartoons and drawings of Muhammad are a grave insult to Muslims, so liberals feel that they should not be shown. Whereas many of us feel that the First Amendment protects all types of speech, even inflammatory speech, people like New York Times writer Rukmini Callimachi, take a very different view:

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Via Dennis Prager’s Facebook page, a reminder from WND that even in Texas government is a circus.  Officials with the city of Houston, Texas, who are defending a controversial ordinance that would allow men to use women’s restrooms now have demanded to see the sermons preached by several area pastors. [….] Preview Open

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That’s the title of a good Hitchcock film released in 1953. It concerns a Catholic priest who receives the confession of a murderer during the sacrament and then is pressured to reveal that confession to police.  Sixty years ago, that scenario was just strong dramatic fiction. Today, it’s a reality for one priest in Louisiana:  […]

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I have little respect for Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a judge, but occasionally she does have a point.  Suppose an employer’s sincerely held religious belief is offended by health coverage of vaccines, or paying the minimum wage or according women equal pay for substantially similar work? Preview Open

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