Tag: 1915 Armenian Genocide

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. Turkish Trick or Treat?

 

A young veteran reminded me of the truly ancient roots of conflict in the Middle East, pointing to lines we do not even see on the sand and soil. This prompted me to return to a summary sketch I laid aside months ago, after fleshing out an account of what we now call Iran. Then the House of Representatives passed a non-binding resolution condemning the Ottoman Empire for committing the first genocide of the 20th Century…and 12 Republicans joined Rep. Ilhan Omar in opposing the resolution! What? Why? What follows is a single summary of the other three big players, historically, now known as Turkey, Egypt, and Saudi Arabia.

Iran and Egypt can point to the most ancient civilizations, as their progenitors were contemporary regional powers. The clash between them was captured in the ancient Hebrew texts, as the Jewish people were caught in the middle. Saudi Arabia comes next, with claims to punching far above their weight with armies fired by the fervor of a new faith, and more recently of being the secular and religious guardians of the faith. Finally, the Turks can claim to have been the most successful and latest power to rule the region for centuries after imposing final defeat on the (Christian) Eastern Roman empire.

Contributor Post Created with Sketch. Recommended by Ricochet Members Created with Sketch. What Genocide? The First State-Directed Mass Murder in a Bloody Century

 

France24 has topics for both Sri Lanka and the Armenian Genocide. No stories on the Armenian Genocide 104th anniversary appear on CNN’s website. Then again, CNN is in good company with Fox News, also silent on the anniversary. As a brief refresher, the Ottoman Empire, almost on its death bed—before a group of younger officers dragged the Turkish nation into secular modernity—launched a campaign against Armenian communities. This ethnic cleansing and mass murder campaign was not only ethnic but also religious.

The Ottoman sultan would no longer tolerate the existence of some of the most ancient Christian communities in the world. There was much unrest in the larger region over borders and nations. The rationale offered by the Turks’ German allies, at the time, was that there was only room for one people on the land. Americans launched large humanitarian relief efforts, but no nation stepped in to stop the atrocities. Indeed, who could, as war raged in Europe, then gave way to the task of rebuilding and redrawing maps.

Member Post

 

I wrote a post a few days ago regarding the new movie, “The Promise”, starring Christian Bale, just released April 26. It chronicles the genocide of 1.5 million Armenian Christians by the Turks in 1915. Even the attempt to make a movie, documenting the genocide and displacement of millions of innocent people that Turkey still […]

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Promoted from the Ricochet Member Feed by Editors Created with Sketch. What Happened to 1.5 Million Armenian Christians?

 

Between 1915 and the early 1920’s, the word genocide entered the English language. It was orchestrated by the Turkish government to expel Christians from their country by any means necessary. When it ended, 1.5 million Armenian Christians were dead and many more deported. Has the government of Turkey ever acknowledged this period of history or apologized? Far from it. It is still illegal to talk about or even acknowledge the extent of this atrocity in Turkey today.

In the 1940s, MGM wanted to make a movie about it starring Clark Gable. They were threatened by the Turkish government and the movie was never made. Yet history and truth have a way of resurfacing.