This week, it’s the sexiest Ricochet Podcast in memory as we parse the continuing harassment revelations, and the troubling and bizarre saga of Judge Roy Moore. But before we get to that, former New York Congressman Chris Gibson stops by to talk about his book Rally Point: Five Tasks to Unite the Country and Revitalize the American Dream and his views on uniting the country and revitalizing the American dream. Then, newly minted Ricochet podcaster Erick Erickson stops by to give his boots-on-ground (he’s based in Atlanta) view on Roy Moore and talk about his heartbreaking and inspirational new book Before You Wake: Life Lessons from a Father to His Children.

Music from this week’s show: Don’t Stand So Close To Me by The Police

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for November 7, 2017, it’s number 147, the Happy Trump Year edition of the show with your hosts Hartford radio guy Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa. One day short of the anniversary of napalm in the morning…or evening…or whenever. It was victory when it happened. And it smelled great!

But first, a word from our sponsors! Don’t forget, this Saturday in Burlington MA at the Tavern in the Square, 100 District Ave. come join founder Rob Long and Michael in the Morning host Michael Graham along with us guys, the HLC podcasters Todd and Mike for an evening of comradery, argument and great fun at the Boston area Ricochet meetup.

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In the new book, “WTF: What’s the Future, and Why It’s Up to Us,” founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media Tim O’Reilly argues Silicon Valley and the innovation it’s fostering can be either a fount of amazement or a source of dismay. The direction technology leads our society is ultimately up to us, the policymakers and the public they represent. He joined the podcast to discuss how Americans should respond to the coming changes, and whether our government is up to the task.

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (@RedSteeze) welcome back writer and musician James Poulos (@JamesPoulos) to chat about everything from spacegaze to Nietzsche to mimetic desire. James is the author of The Art of Being Free, a contributing editor at National Affairs, and a contributor to Ricochet, The Federalist, Foreign Policy, and Vice. He’s also in a great band called Vast Asteroid.

The intro/outro song is “Sick” by Vast Asteroid. Jon’s song of the week is “This Is Permanent” by Airiel and Stephen’s is “A Part of Us” by Fever Ray. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud the Washington Post, not only for condemning the Latino Victory Fund ad that depicts Republican voters in Virginia as racists that want to run over minority kids but also slamming Democratic nominee Ralph Northam – whom the Post has endorsed – for a weak response to the ad. They also grieve for the victims of Tuesday’s terrorist attack in Manhattan and get frustrated as the media immediately tried to rule out Islamic terrorism and then insist it’s not a time for politics once they find out it was related to radical Islam. And they groan as congressional Republicans are forced to postpone the release of their tax reform bill because of ongoing disagreements within the party.

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That could describe Charlie Sykes – a powerful batter for truth, conservative ideas, and integrity. He joins to talk about his new book – How The Right Lost Its Mind.

Jay and Mona then turn to the Mueller investigation, latent libertarianism, and yes – baseball.

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A year or two ago, a colleague of Jay’s said, “If you want to know anything about Russia and Europe – if you want to know anything about Putin’s influence worldwide – you MUST consult Mark Galeotti.” He never forgot it. And Jay has now done a “Q&A” with Galeotti.

He is a British scholar working in Prague. He does indeed know everything, or an enormous amount. With Jay, he talks about Putin, Russia, Europe, the U.S., nationalism, jihadist Islam, Facebook, Twitter – many of the things that are in our faces now.

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Happy Halloween! This episode of The Bookmonger features a 10-minute conversation with Leslie S. Klinger, editor of The New Annotated Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley. Why has Shelley’s novel endured for two centuries? What does its fame owe to Boris Karloff and the movies? Does it hold any special lessons in our age of rapid scientific and technological advances?

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (@RedSteeze) talk about Trump’s Halloween trolling of the media, the replacement of Senator Flake by Senator Gabriel, and Hillary’s latest Russia problem.

The intro/outro song is “I Drive a Lot” by Starflyer 59. Jon’s song of the week is “Like a Baby” by Starflyer 59 and Stephen’s is “Maps” by the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist.

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Or very nearly. Jay and Mona reflect on New York City’s glorious renewal, the work of great philanthropists, the worth of work in general, Putin’s Kafkaesque assault on truth, and a grim anniversary, among many other topics.

Here is a link to the Bach piece mentioned toward the end of the podcast. 

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“It’s time for the Ricochet Poooodcaaaast!” If only we had Vin Scully to announce that the epic way he did earlier this week at Game 2 of The World Series.  But this podcast ain’t too shabby either: leading off we’ve got the great Mollie Hemingway on that whole dossier controversy and batting cleanup, it’s power-hitter Pat Sajak on the greatest game, this series, and why baseball will always be the America’s pastime. Batter up!

Music from this week’s podcast: My Blue Heaven by Fats Domino

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Jim Geraghty of National Review with Chad Benson, filling in for Greg Corombos of Radio America. In advance of the Q3 estimate, GDP appears to have hit the 3% mark. Jim and Chad discuss what this means for the average American. Next, Megan McArdle makes the case that expanding school choice has only generating minor improvement in the country’s education system. Finally, the Trump presidency may have the unfortunate side effect of encouraging reality stars with no experience in government to run for the top office.

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Catalina Serrano is a Colombian and the wife of Andrés Felipe Arias, a minister in the cabinet of President Álvaro Uribe. Arias was, in fact, Uribe’s chosen successor. But Arias was railroaded in the Colombian judicial system. His case is positively Kafkaesque. With his family, he fled to the United States to seek political asylum. He is now in federal detention, scheduled to be extradited.

Jay wrote about all this in a piece called “Asylum Now: The awful case of a splendid man.”

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David French of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America applaud former NPR CEO Ken Stern for taking the time to meet voters in red states and realizing they are nothing like the caricature offered by the mainstream media. They’re also exasperated as President Trump and Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker resume their public feud and accomplish nothing other than choke momentum for tax reform and tax cuts. And they react with disgust to a University of Illinois professor who argues that proficiency in algebra and geometry perpetuates unearned white privilege and that “mathematics itself operates as Whiteness.”

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Antonin Scalia was not merely a great legal mind, he was also a great writer–as Christopher J. Scalia reveals in Scalia Speaks: Reflections on Law, Faith, and Life Well Lived, a collection of speeches by his late father (and co-edited with Edward Whelan).

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Scalia describes assembling this book from his father’s papers, how the elder Scalia learned to write so well and on so many topics (from the value of the arts to the wonders of turkey hunting), and on his surprising friendship with fellow Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

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He has a new novel out, Mark Helprin does: “Paris in the Present Tense.” Among his previous novels are “Winter’s Tale,” “A Soldier of the Great War,” and “In Sunlight and in Shadow.” The new one is about love and loyalty. Aren’t they all? As Jay says, it’s another blow by Helprin for truth and beauty. Enjoy the show.

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It’s been a bad week for Hollywood’s grasp on moral authority. First, Harvey Weinstein is fired for transgressions going back decades, and then some guy from Amazon gets fired for basically the same thing. To help guide us through the moral minefield, we call up New York Times columns extraordinaire Ross Douthat. We also talk Hefner and that pesky 25th Amendment. Then, Christopher Scalia, son of Antonin Scalia on this new book Scalia Speaks: Reflections on Law, Faith, and Life Well Lived. The book is a collection of Justice Scalia’s speeches and we talk about his influence, his passions, and his unlikely friendship with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. Also, the President appears to have an issue with freedom of the press. Is this one of those times we shouldn’t take him literally?

Music from this week’s show: All I Really Want by Alanis Morrissette

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are glad to see the NFL concluding that the national anthem protests need to move to an actual effort to improve community-police relations and that the players ought to stand. They also slam Twitter for the second time this week, this time for suspending the Twitter account of actress Rose McGowan, who was assaulted by Harvey Weinstein and has called out actor Ben Affleck for not admitting he knew of Weinstein’s past. And they shake their heads as Fox News host Sean Hannity hammers Sen. Ben Sasse for being critical of President Trump’s call for licenses of media outlets to be challenged over “fake news.”

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (@RedSteeze) welcome Lisa De Pasquale (@LisaDeP). She’s the author of The Social Justice Warrior Handbook: A Practical Survival Guide for Snowflakes, Millennials, and Generation Z, and is a columnist and frequent guest on Fox News and Fox Business. Also, Stephen and Jon talk about Hurricane Harvey Weinstein slamming Hollywood and the problems it creates for the Democratic Party.

The intro/outro song and Stephen’s song of the week is “You’re Dreaming” by Wolf Parade and Jon’s is “Afterlife” by Public Memory. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist.

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