This week, The Conservatarians — aka, Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel and Heatstreet contributor Stephen Miller — take on fake news, pierce the progressive bubble, and mock the freak out over Trump’s cabinet picks.

Our intro and outro music is “Ice Cream” by Battles. Jon’s song of the week is “Colour Television” by Eddy Current Suppression Ring, and Stephen’s is “Alabama” by Night Moves. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist! You should also subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes.

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David Clarke is one of the most famous lawmen in America. He is the sheriff of Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. He is a commanding personality who has much experience and much to say. And he says it very well.

Sheriff Clarke is a guest on National Review’s current cruise. Jay sat down with him for a “Q&A” in front of an audience.

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America and the world after the election of Trump: This is the general topic of Jay’s “Q&A” with John Hillen – who is, as Jay says, a soldier, scholar, businessman, athlete, and, in a word, hombre. Their specific topics are Syria, Russia, Ukraine, Europe, NATO, Japan, South Korea, the U.S. military, NAFTA, freedom, and so on.

As Hillen pointed out to Jay, after the podcast, Churchill had a word to America when our nation was on the ascendant, internationally: “The price of greatness is responsibility.” Clearly a theme of our time.

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This week, The Conservatarians — aka, Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel and Heatstreet contributor Stephen Miller — label 2016 the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame of Death, celebrate the ugly end to Clinton, Inc., and wonder what a Trump Presidential Library will look like.

Our intro and outro music is “Everybody Knows” by Leonard Cohen. Jon’s song of the week is “Hallelujah” by Jeff Buckley, and Stephen’s is “Thin Air” by Teenage Fanclub. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist! You should also subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes.

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Greg Corombos of Radio America and David French of National Review applaud Democrats for suddenly recognizing and appreciating things like federalism, freedom of dissent, and the separation of powers now that Republicans are headed back to the White House. They also slam the anti-Trump protesters for blocking traffic and engaging in violence and the colleges offering safe spaces, counseling, and even crayons and Play-Doh to students bothered by Trump’s win. And they discuss the liberal calls for abolishing the Electoral College.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club podcast for November 9, 2016 it’s the “Trump is a Genius” edition of the podcast. We’ll discuss the new reality of November 9, 2016. We’ve been wondering what this day was going to be like for *ever*. And it turns out to be better than we could possibly have imagined it! Not only did Trump win, but the sheer energy of the victory carried along almost all of his detractors on the right – at least temporarily – like a tsunami…a temporary tsunami?

We will discuss the change in the electorate that brought this about. Are the blue collar, Reagan Democrat, rust belt “leftover” voters a permanent feature of the new Republican coalition? Are Democrats in Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin – what Michael Moore called the “Brexit states,” destined to be a vanishing breed just as Democrats in the South have vanished?

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America offer their predictions for Election Day 2016. Jim and Greg state their final electoral college results and go over each of the key swing states. They also predict the final balance in the U.S. Senate come January and go through each of those key races. And they discuss what the numbers in the U.S House of Representatives will look like.

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It’s the most mysterious manuscript in the world, says Raymond Clemens, editor of The Voynich Manuscript.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Clemens describes why people are so fascinated by this medieval document that has puzzled cryptographers and sparked imaginations. He also explains how it came into the possession of Yale’s rare books library and why Yale University Press has now issued a photo-facsimile edition of this beguiling book.

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This week, The Conservatarians — aka, Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel and Heatstreet contributor Stephen Miller — talk about tightening polls, Donald keeping on message, and Hillary’s dumb war with the FBI. And instead of just kvetching about the bad news, they share their favorite parts of the topsy-turvy 2016 race.

Our intro and outro music is “Dead + Rural” by Handsome Furs. Jon’s song of the week is “Way We Won’t” by Grandaddy, and Stephen’s is “Yesterday” by J. Churcher. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist! You should also subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes.

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This week, The Conservatarians — aka, Ricochet Editor-in-Chief Jon Gabriel and Heatstreet contributor Stephen Miller — talk about Hillary’s new email headaches, Obamacare’s implosion, and Stephen’s adventures in Trump country.

Stephen’s song of the week (and our intro and outro music) is “Finally” by Cymbals Eat Guitars. Jon’s song of the week is “CHEETAHT2 (Ld spectrum)” by Aphex Twin. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist! You should also subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes.

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What explains the enduring appeal of vampires? British writer Christopher Frayling explains the attraction in Vampyres: Genesis and Resurrection from Count Dracula to Vampirella.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Frayling describes his own fascination with these neck biters as well as how some have evolved in recent years away from their villainous heritage. Finally, he picks his favorite vampire movie, offering his suggestion for the best vampire flick to watch for Halloween.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America cheer Defense Secretary Ash Carter for stopping the government’s efforts to get re-enlistment bonus money back from soldiers fought in Iraq and Afghanistan. They also sigh as the latest WikiLeaks revelations show the Clinton Foundation also worked to line Bill’s pockets with huge speaking fees. And they unload on Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber for suggesting the only thing needed to improve Obamacare is to jack up the penalties on people who don’t buy insurance.

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Did Citizens United hand the US electoral system to nefarious corporate interests and “dark money”? We ask former FEC chairman and free speech advocate Bradley Smith. His lucid explication makes even this murky realm of the law very clear.

Jay and Mona then consider emotionalism, tribalism, and extremism in American politics. Also, is it just the women angle that makes Trump unacceptable? Bob Dylan gets a shout out that he might not like.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America appreciate at least one prominent Democrat facing justice as former Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane is sentenced to jail. They also wince as the Cook Political Report predicts Democrats will win back the U.S. Senate. And we unload on a new PSA showing schoolkids berating a classmate because his dad didn’t vote.

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Why would a series of religious biographies issue a title on the famous iconoclast H.L Mencken? That’s the challenge D.H. Hart had to answer in his new book, Damning Words: The Life and Religious Times of H.L. Mencken.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Hart describes his subject’s massive influence nearly a century ago as well as what Mencken really thought about God, the universe, and everything. He also tries to explain why Mencken, despite his apostasies, appeals more to conservatives than liberals today.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for October 25, 2016, it’s the “Trump is Dead” edition. Your hosts Todd Feinburg, Boston area talk show guy and Mike Stopa, practicing nanophysicist will guide you again through this week’s obstacle course of an election and preview what’s going to happen if we wake up on November 9 to President-elect Hillary Clinton (as we seem painfully likely to do). We will not spare you the pain: Obamacare cast in cement, pathway to citizenship, oppressive taxation (“she’ll go where the money is”) – are on the horizon. What do we do?

And we’ll also discuss the drip, drip, drip of the Wikileaks email dumps. If we haven’t heard the crescendo yet, what can we expect to come next? We discuss the revelation of some supposedly distinguished journalists cravenly calling themselves “hacks” and running their copy by John Podesta, the DNC or any other leftwing outfit that gives them succor and access. (Hint: we name names…but that’s what Wikileaks is all about, isn’t it?).

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Jay takes advantage of “Q&A” to do away with “Q&A” and record a music program instead – this one related to Halloween. So there is a variety of spooky and devilish music – by Tartini, Rachmaninoff, Liszt, and others. From a violin sonata to an aria to a horse ride into hell to a sorcerer (or rather, his apprentice). Enjoy, and don’t be too scared.

The track list for this show is here.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club podcast for October 18, 2016 it’s the Rigged Podcast edition of the show. We are thrilled to have the chance this week to talk matters philosophical and transcendent (and Supreme Court) during our exclusive interview with Emily Bazelon of the New York Times Magazine and the Slate Political Gabfest who joins us again at HLC.

The Trump Train continues to clatter down the tracks and the days of rigorous speeches and focused message in late August and early September that brought the race to parity seems to be a thing of the past. Trump continues to draw tens of thousands but The Donald’s focus seems to be on polls and process. We discuss this and we also discuss a powerful piece by Hoover Institution historian and overall conservative big cheese Victor Davis Hanson – in The National Review no less – arguing the case for conservatives to vote for Trump. (We thought that was a no-brainer long ago).

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Between 2011 and 2015, the opinion section of the New York Times marked the sesquicentennial of the Civil War by tracking events on their anniversaries via a blog with original content–and now its editors have issued a collection, Disunion: A History of the Civil War.

In a 15-minute conversation with The Bookmonger (we had so much fun, we went long!), co-editor Clay Risen describes how the project came together and why it relied so much on amateur experts, plus he describes the most surprising thing he learned about the conflict (it involves coffee). He also makes a case for why conservatives should read the op-ed page of the New York Times.

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Presidential historian Tevi Troy drops by to talk about crises. He’s written a book titled Shall We Wake the President? Wilson was a flop at responding to the 1918 flu, but Reagan responded well to the Tylenol poisoning case. This much is certain: Every president will have to respond to a crisis, so . . .

After Tevi departs Jay and Mona consider the crisis of the election and the hypocrisy of the right. How did we get here? Will we all come back together after November 8? 

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