As the next generation of robots arrive in the workplace, will they enable workers or replace them? According to MIT’s Daron Acemoglu, one of the most frequently cited economists in the world, this distinction is the difference between technology that raises workers’ wages versus tech that merely reduces overall employment and wage growth.

Daron Acemoglu is a professor of economics at MIT, a frequent contributor to Foreign Policy Magazine, and co-author of Why Nations Fail. He joins me today to discuss his research and what technological innovation means for the future of work.

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Our own Dave Carter sits down this week with Dr. Rob Tibbitts, who is a local pastor and disaster relief coordinator in Vinton, Louisiana, a town which has been devastated by two major floods within the last 18 months. Dr. Tibbitts is also Dave’s brother in-law, and Dave describes the conversation as being, “in equal parts, heartbreaking and uplifting,” adding, “It’s a story about people of meager means who were dealt a harsh blow 18 months ago; who received loans from the federal government to rebuild their homes in the aftermath of a ‘500 year flood,’ and who’v seen their houses destroyed yet again leaving them with a mortgage, a home loan, and no apparent means of rebuilding.” Along the way, Rob explains the herculean relief efforts currently underway, the charities and organizations making an importance difference for the better, and why the Red Cross is persona non grata.

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The Three Martini Lunch is on vacation for the week and will return on Monday, September 11. Please enjoy this encore presentation of a recent podcast.

Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America show optimism that new White House Chief of Staff John Kelly will bring stability and focus to the Trump administration. They also criticize Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski for her refusal to answer a question about why she did not vote for the repeal of Obamacare even though she voted in favor of repeal in 2015. And they react to Maryland Rep. John Delaney announcing his candidacy for the Democratic Party’s nomination for president in 2020, right after they figure out who he is.

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (aka @RedSteeze) chat about the future Senator Kid Rock, media coverage of Hurricane Harvey, and the left’s rapid about-face on Antifa.

The intro song is “Motor Away” by Guided by Voices. Stephen’s song of the week is “call the police” by LCD Soundsystem and Jon’s is “Keys to the Kingdom” by UNKLE and Gavin Clark. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist. You also should subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes!

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It’s time to admit criticism of FLOTUS has gone too far. Bethany and Lyndsey discuss.

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Today, our topic is the Republican plan—or plans plural—to overhaul the Internal Revenue Code. Some people think tax reform is easier than health care reform, but I’m not so sure. Congress hasn’t passed meaningful tax reform in more than 30 years.

So how should we reform the tax code? Are Congressional Republicans on the right track? And how likely are they to get it done?

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North Korea won’t quit lobbing missiles. Associate Editor Ethan Epstein joins host Eric Felten to talk about what the response should be to the Kim regime’s ballistic provocations.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America are aghast as the threat to life along the Texas coast gets more dire but they are amazed at the tireless efforts by exhausted heroes to save thousands and thousands of lives. They also disgusted, but not surprised, as North Korea fired a missile over Japan in one of the most provocative acts in years. And they sigh as the mainstream media leap to the conclusion that man-caused climate change is responsible for the extent of the devastation in Texas.

Also a note to our listeners, Three Martini Lunch will spend next week on vacation before resuming on Monday, September 11. We will have episodes for the rest of this week.

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Jame Delingpole and Toby Young discuss their thoughts on the last episode of the season and wonder what’s in store for the last season of the show coming in two years?!

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Herbert Hoover was the first president to be born and raised west of the Mississippi, and has the unfortunate legacy of having the stock market crash of 1929 and the following great depression during his single term in office. Salena Zito is joined this week by President Hoover’s great-granddaughter Margaret Hoover. Margaret is the president of the only GOP non-profit fighting for equal rights for the LGBT community, and a CNN contributor along with Salena.

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On this week’s episode, the Substandard reviews Logan Lucky and ranks the Soderbergh oeuvre. Sonny does Internet research, Mike goes mulching, Vic asks: What’s mulch? Plus: Sonny makes Old Fashioneds (and his own simple syrup) and Gene Shalit returns! All on this week’s “Dick York-Dick Sargent” episode of the Substandard!

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With only one more episode left in the season, Toby Young and James Delingpole go deep on this week’s episode, including and in depth discussion of who is the most desirable (not the word they used) character on the show? Tune in to hear the final verdict.

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Studies of Paul may be the liveliest area of biblical scholarship today, says Paula Fredriksen, author of Paul: The Pagans’ Apostle.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Fredriksen describes why Paul was so important to early Christianity, how we know what we know about his life and times, whether he’d be surprised that the end times still have not come, and what he must have been like to meet in person.

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The Washington Examiner’s White House correspondents Gabby Morrongiello, Sarah Westwood, and Steven Nelson discuss what we can expect from the White House this week. Coming off of a tense week that had councils disbanded, advisers removed, and accusations of racism abound, what comes next from Trump is the question on everyone’s mind. Steve Bannon was Trump’s chief strategist, and now the President is running solo. Our correspondents share what they believe will happen next for the administration.

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With current headlines ranging from bad to hideous, Dave thought it might be worthwhile to hit some of the more notable moments from his recent interviews with Pat Sajak, Emily Esfahani Smith, David Deeble, Dave Sussman, DC McAllister, and his fellow military buddies, Bob Lee and Pat Murphy. If you’d like to just relax and smile for a bit, you’ve come to the right place.

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (aka @RedSteeze) chat about falling statues, the alt-left vs. the alt-right, and the firing of Steve Bannon.

The intro song and Stephen’s song of the week is “Creature Comfort” by Arcade Fire. Jon’s song of the week is “Slip” by Game Theory. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist. You also should subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes!

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Teri, Kira, and April tackle the hard questions surrounding the events in Charlottesville, including the role of antifa fascists in creating the chaos, why the media is complicit in the ongoing divides, and what President Trump got right.

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On this week’s episode, the Substandard discusses The Dark Tower, the best and worst Stephen King film adaptations—i.e., rankings!—and this summer’s box office doldrums. Sonny reveals himself as a Stephen King scholar. JVL thinks Tolstoy > Stephen King (he must be joking). Vic hated the deli slicer scene in Children of the Corn. Plus a trip to IKEA, a schnitzel recipe, and more horology—all on this week’s Substandard!

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Welcome, welcome, welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for August 15, 2017 it’s the Double Standard edition of the show with your hosts, radio talk show host Todd Feinburg and nanophysicist Mike Stopa. This week our guest is our friend Heather Mac Donald who joins us from the arid environs of Southern Cal and comforts us by confiding that she is no longer piloting an automated vehicle on the suicidal freeways of the south-left coast. Stay safe, Heather!

We discuss the situation in Charlottesville and the resulting debris spreading outward across the country – not least of all to the White House and the President. Here is, I would say, the kind of cognitive dissonance that the left lives with every day when an internal contradiction in their worldview rears its ugly head. A hopefully psychopathic cretin associated with the White Supremacist movement takes his car and – tearing a book from the ISIS playbook – rams it into a crowd of peaceful protesters killing one and injuring many others. Save me, for a moment, the equivocations. This murderer is, or thinks he is, one of us. Consequently, he besmirches all of us.

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James Delingpole is back from holiday and Toby Young is puzzled at the lack of law schools grads in the Game of Thrones universe. Also, is Jon Snow not a bastard? Listen in to find out.

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