Toby Young and James Delingpole return to dissect the second episode of Game of Thrones. What did they get right? What did they get wrong? Take a sword to them in the comments.

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The US economy appears to be stuck at around 2% GDP growth, much less than the 3.5% it has averaged between World War II and the Great Recession. One reason is that productivity growth – that is, output per worker — is barely rising. Why is the American economy apparently not as productive as it used to be? Are we, despite tech giants such as Apple and Google, somehow less innovative than in the past? If so, why are we so worried about robots taking our jobs?

To help us answer those questions and others, I’m delighted to have as my guest today Bret Swanson, an AEI visiting fellow and president of Entropy Economics, a strategic research firm specializing in technology, innovation, and the global economy. Bret is the co-author of the recent report, “The Coming Productivity Boom,” and he joins us today to discuss why he thinks much higher productivity growth is just around the corner.

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He was once “one of the most widely known American writers at home and abroad,” writes Christoph Ir>mscher in his new biography, Max Eastman: A Life. So whatever happened to Max Eastman?

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Irmscher describes the life of Eastman (1883-1969), a public intellectual who started out as a political radical but then moved to the right, eventually becoming a contributor to National Review. He suggests that Eastman was the Christopher Hitchens of his time and makes the case for rediscovering Eastman today.

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Our own Dave Carter recently sat down with our own Susan Quinn to discuss her recent Ricochet post, It’s Time To Fight Back, which evidently is a reversal of sorts for Susan. Dave writes, “whereas she previously took more of a live-and-let-live approach to attacks from the left, Susan has decided that if we on the right don’t fight back, and do so aggressively and relentlessly, we risk losing the debate and the country. She explained her position with candor and conviction during our conversation. Her’s is a compelling case worth hearing.” We think you’ll agree.

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It’s a very special late July episode of HWX, with Brian Ward and Paul Happe reconvening to discuss the critical issues of our times. Topics addressed include:
After 63 successful votes to repeal Obamacare while there was a Democrat in the White House, the Republicans strike out in their first attempt while having a President who might sign something. How does this happen? We break it down. Plus, the latest installment of This Week in Alternative Never Trump History. What might have happened if Hillary won?

It’s been the summer of Russia in Washington and in the media. We discuss how we got here and what it all means. Plus exclusive, just leaked audio which may finally prove the connection between Donald Trump and Russian hackers.

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Episode 50 – isn’t that nifty?! This week, April, Kira and Teri talk O.J. – and the unfortunate “personalities” we’re stuck with today because of him – health care cowards (we’re looking at you Sens. Murkowski, Capito, and Portman!), and the joys of potty training. Also, hear all about Kira’s Twitter exchange with actress Alyssa Milano.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America shake their heads in disgust as a straight Obamacare repeal appears doomed in the Senate, due to opposition from multiple Republican senators who voted for the very same bill two years ago – when they knew it would be vetoed. They also react to reports that President Trump engaged in a dinner conversation with Vladimir Putin without any other members of his staff, including a U.S. translator. And they wonder if an intervention is necessary for liberal writer Louise Mensch, after she tweeted that unnamed people might seek the death penalty for White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon due to his supposed espionage on behalf of the Russians.

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Jon Gabriel (@ExJon) and Stephen Miller (aka @RedSteeze) welcome author and columnist Michael Malice to chat about, what else, North Korea and “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” Michael is the author of Dear Reader: The Unauthorized Autobiography of Kim Jong Il, hosts the “Your Welcome” podcast, and has been a frequent guest on “Kennedy,” “Red Eye,” and other Fox offerings.

The intro song is “Is Chicago, Is Not Chicago” by Soul Coughing. Stephen’s song of the week is “Farrah Abraham” by Mathew Lee Cothran and Jon’s is “Ariadna” by Kedr Livanskiy. To listen to all the music featured on The Conservatarians, subscribe to our Spotify playlist. You also should subscribe to this podcast and give it five-star, glowing reviews on iTunes!

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for July 18, it’s the abbreviated “Obvious Topics” edition of the show with your humble hosts (well, one of them is humble anyway) Todd Feinburg and Mike Stopa.

This week things seem to have calmed down just a little. The media has their “smoking gun” of Russian collusion and Nancy Pelosi has her dreams of eternal Obamacare come true.

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A new Game of Thrones season has begun and guide you through all of the plot lines, we’ve reassembled our intrepid team of GoT experts, James Delingpole and Toby Young. This week, Jon Snow becomes a leader, Sansa is the power behind the Throne, Arya wears a mask, and Ed Sheeran must go.

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Jim Geraghty of National Review and Greg Corombos of Radio America start the week off with three crazy martinis, beginning with the Secret Service disputing a Trump lawyer’s claim that it vetted the people who met with Donald Trump Jr. in June 2016. They also scold both Jane Sanders and Kellyanne Conway for asserting – in separate situations – that harsh criticism of them is a result of their gender. And they sigh as Ann Coulter unloads on Delta Airlines in a Twitter rant after having her seat assignment changed.

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Bill Browder, the man behind the Magnitsky Act and a tireless campaigner for human rights, joins to discuss the shady characters who met with Trump campaign officials last year. Browder knows them all, but his judgment is measured and cautious.

Jay and Mona also discuss whataboutism, the politics of jerseys, and slightly differ on the nature of Trump’s support.

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The Wall Street Journal publishes a legendary editorial page–and George Melloan reveals its history from the inside with Free People, Free Markets: How the Wall Street Journal Opinion Pages Shaped America.

In a 10-minute conversation with The Bookmonger, Melloan describes the issues that animate the Journal’s opinion section, how the editors select the topics they cover, and whether he’d encourage young people to pursue careers in journalism.

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Today, our topic is the state of the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare. We’re recording this podcast just after Congress has come back to Washington from the Fourth of July recess.

The Senate Republican health care bill, the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017, is on thin ice, with about ten Republican Senators expressing reservations about the bill. Can Mitch McConnell get 50 senators to yes? What are the implications for the future of health care in America if he can—or can’t?

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Republicans invoke Ronald Reagan constantly. They sing his praises every chance they get, and seem to believe there is no public policy problem that a good dose of Reaganism can’t fix. But has the Right got Reagan wrong all this time? In his new book, The Working Class Republican: Ronald Reagan and the Return of Blue-Collar Conservatism, Henry Olsen argues the classic conception of Reagan as an arch-libertarian on economic policy is misguided. Only by understanding the real Reagan can Republicans forge a lasting coalition capable of governing America well into the future.

Henry Olsen is a senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, where he studies and provides commentary on American politics. His work focuses on how to address the electoral challenges facing modern American conservatism, while staying true to conservative principles. Before joining the Ethics and Public Policy Center, Mr. Olsen most recently served from 2006 to 2013 as vice president and director of the National Research Initiative at AEI. He previously worked as vice president of programs at the Manhattan Institute and president of the Commonwealth Foundation. His work has been featured in many prominent publications, including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, National Review, and The Weekly Standard.

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What do you get when you put Dave Carter, Dave Sussman, and David Deeble on the same podcast (other than preliminary plans for world domination)? As Dave Carter described the conversation, “It was, in turn, nuts, hilarious, serious, and analytical. In other words, you could rope us off and charge admission to view.” After some initial difficulty figuring out how to do a three-way Skype call, the gentlemen nearly called this episode “Three Old Guys and Their Electronic Devices,” but elected instead to start their own law firm for reasons you’ll have to hear for yourself to understand.

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Welcome to the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast for July 5, 2017 it’s the “Podcast of Record” edition of the podcast with your hosts Mike Stopa and Todd Feinburg. On this celebratory weekend of America’s birthday we bring you two stories from the Grey Lady herself, the New York Times, (who says it’s all fake news???) describing (1) how liberals are segregating America and (2) how they are attempting to invoke sympathy for Central Americans who are forced to cancel their well laid plans for trekking with human smugglers across the desert, children in tow, to enter America illegally.

First, the august NYT describes the current state of the “Fair Housing Act” (from 1968) and how these days what it is doing is offering tax exempt funding for low income housing that builders can only find already impoverished communities to build in (Program to Spur Low-Income Housing is Keeping Cities Segregated).The result: more segregation. Who could have imagined such a well-intentioned government program having consequences that, well, nobody thought of???

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Frank Lavin has had a busy and interesting life. He worked for Reagan, Bush 41, and Bush 43. He was ambassador to Singapore. He is a robust free-trader. He is now a businessman. And he is the author of a book about his father: “Home Front to Battlefront: An Ohio Teenager in World War II.”

Jay picks his brain about an assortment of things, and Lavin’s brain is eminently pickable. A conversation about Reagan, Singapore, Japan, China, trade, the Republican party, the Greatest Generation, the American future, and more.

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Kira, April, and Teri are back after a week off! Topics include the sad conclusion of the Otto Warmbier saga and the outrageous and upsetting Charlie Gard story out of the UK. Also, April gives an update on her Lasik procedure (cue Johnny Nash) and Teri laments the awfulness that is moving to new house.

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The Supreme Court decided an important case, decided to take on another important case, and Justice Neil Gorsuch weighed in for the first time since he joined the court. Since Jay and Neal know nothing about the law, let alone constitutional law, they asked an expert to join the show.

Georgetown Law Professor Randy Barnett talked about all of these issues, including how originalism has gone mainstream in the judiciary. Randy breaks things down very well, so even if you’re not an attorney, you’ll get a lot out of it.

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We’ve grown accustomed to hearing a lot about the one percent. Yet it’s the “favored fifth” – the top 20 percent of the income distribution – that Brookings Senior Fellow Richard Reeves asserts is the greater problem. “The rhetoric of ‘We are the 99 percent,’” Reeves writes, “has in fact been dangerously self-serving.” From supporters of Elizabeth Warren to Donald Trump, upper middle class Americans everywhere claim they want to unrig the system. But far more than they’d like to admit, they are the ones who are rigging it. From exclusionary zoning policy to the mortgage-interest deduction to the 529 college savings plans, the upper middle class constructs glass floors for their children, perpetuating inequality and impeding social mobility for the remaining 80 percent of Americans. Richard Reeves joins me to discuss all this and his recent book, Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class Is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That Is a Problem, and What to Do About it.

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We celebrate the SCOTUS ruling that, to no sane person’s surprise, the suspension of President Trump’s ban on travel from “six predominantly Muslim countries” was an absurd invasion by judicial activists into the blatantly Executive functions of the government. This is, as you have guessed, the Harvard Lunch Club Political Podcast, episode 128, with our guest Jessica Vaughan from the Center for Immigration Studies.

(Apologies that this episode has some serious unbalance to the audio – we will be improving the technology in the coming weeks. Thanks for your patience).

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Has America ever had a true conservative tradition? We are here with Patrick Deneen to discuss that question, and his book, Conserving America?: Essays on Present Discontents.

Patrick J. Deneen holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Rutgers University. From 1995-1997 he was Speechwriter and Special Advisor to the Director of the United States Information Agency. He has held professorships at Princeton University and Georgetown University, before joining the faculty of Notre Dame in Fall 2012.

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In this episode, Dave Carter sits down with Ricochet Member Mike LaRoche to discuss Mike’s journey from loyal Republican supporter to ex-Republican and ardent supporter of President Trump. Along the way, the good professor hands out grades to the Trump Administration on everything from Foreign Policy to the Veteran’s Administration, Border Security and more, all with the birds chirping in the background as Mike chats from outside his home in beautiful Texas hill country.

As Dave said, “I have a feeling lots of members and contributors will want to listen in.”

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John J. Pitney Jr. is a famous conservative professor of political science. He works at Claremont McKenna College, in California. Jay asks him about California – is there any gold left in it?

He also asks Pitney about his upbringing and education. And about his conservatism. How did he get that way? Well, at 13, he started reading National Review and corresponding with William F. Buckley Jr.

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